• Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans is controlled, in part, by the insulin-like signaling and heat shock response pathways. Following thermal stress, expression levels of small heat shock protein 16.2 show a spatial patterning across the 20 intestinal cells that reside along the length of the worm. Here, we present a hypothesized mechanism that could lead to this patterned response and develop a mathematical model of this system to test our hypothesis. We propose that the patterned expression of heat shock protein is caused by a diffusion-driven instability within the pseudocoelom, or fluid-filled cavity, that borders the intestinal cells in C. elegans. This instability is due to the interactions between two classes of insulin like peptides that serve antagonistic roles. We examine output from the developed model and compare it to experimental data on heat shock protein expression. Furthermore, we use the model to gain insight on possible biological parameters in the system. The model presented is capable of producing patterns similar to what is observed experimentally and provides a first step in mathematically modeling aging-related mechanisms in C. elegans.
  • The flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 0208-512 underwent three outbursts at the optical-near-infrared (OIR) wavelengths during 2008-2011. The second OIR outburst did not have a gamma-ray counterpart despite being comparable in brightness and temporal extent to the other two. We model the time variable spectral energy distribution of PKS 0208-512 during those three flaring episodes with leptonic models to investigate the physical mechanism that can produce this anomalous flare. We show that the redder-when-brighter spectral trend in the OIR bands can be explained by the superposition of a fixed thermal component from the accretion disk and a synchrotron component of fixed shape and variable normalization. We estimate the accretion disk luminosity at L_d ~8 X 10^45 erg/s. Using the observed variability timescale in the OIR band t_{var,obs} ~2 d and the X-ray luminosity L_X ~3.5 X 10^45 erg/s, we constrain the location of the emitting region to distance scales that are broadly comparable with the dusty torus. We show that variations in the Compton dominance parameter by a factor of ~4 --- which may result in the anomalous outburst --- can be relatively easily accounted for by moderate variations in the magnetic field strength or the location of the emission region. Since such variations appear to be rare among FSRQs, we propose that most gamma-ray/OIR flares in these objects are produced in jet regions where the magnetic field and external photon fields vary similarly with distance along the jet, e.g., u_B ~u_ext ~r^{-2}.
  • Prompt gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission requires some mechanism to dissipate an ultrarelativistic jet. Internal shocks or some form of electromagnetic dissipation are candidate mechanisms. Any mechanism needs to answer basic questions, such as what is the origin of variability, what radius does dissipation occur at, and how does efficient prompt emission occur. These mechanisms also need to be consistent with how ultrarelativistic jets form and stay baryon pure despite turbulence and electromagnetic reconnection near the compact object and despite stellar entrainment within the collapsar model. We use the latest magnetohydrodynamical models of ultrarelativistic jets to explore some of these questions in the context of electromagnetic dissipation due to the slow collisional and fast collisionless reconnection mechanisms, as often associated with Sweet-Parker and Petschek reconnection, respectively. For a highly magnetized ultrarelativistic jet and typical collapsar parameters, we find that significant electromagnetic dissipation may be avoided until it proceeds catastrophically near the jet photosphere at large radii ($r\sim 10^{13}--10^{14}{\rm cm}$), by which the jet obtains a high Lorentz factor ($\gamma\sim 100--1000), has a luminosity of $L_j \sim 10^{50}--10^{51}\ergs$, has observer variability timescales of order 1s (ranging from 0.001-10s), achieves $\gamma\theta_j\sim 10--20 (for opening half-angle $\theta_j$) and so is able to produce jet breaks, and has comparable energy available for both prompt and afterglow emission. This reconnection switch mechanism allows for highly efficient conversion of electromagnetic energy into prompt emission and associates the observed prompt GRB pulse temporal structure with dissipation timescales of some number of reconnecting current sheets embedded in the jet.[abridged]
  • Young solar-type stars rotate rapidly and are very magnetically active. The magnetic fields at their surfaces likely originate in their convective envelopes where convection and rotation can drive strong dynamo action. Here we explore simulations of global-scale stellar convection in rapidly rotating suns using the 3-D MHD anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code. The magnetic fields built in these dynamos are organized on global-scales into wreath-like structures that span the convection zone. We explore one case rotates five times faster than the Sun in detail. This dynamo simulation, called case D5, has repeated quasi-cyclic reversals of global-scale polarity. We compare this case D5 to the broader family of simulations we have been able to explore and discuss how future simulations and observations can advance our understanding of stellar dynamos and magnetism.
  • When our Sun was young it rotated much more rapidly than now. Observations of young, rapidly rotating stars indicate that many possess substantial magnetic activity and strong axisymmetric magnetic fields. We conduct simulations of dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the 3-D MHD anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to explore the complex coupling between rotation, convection and magnetism. Here we study dynamo action realized in the bulk of the convection zone for a system rotating at three times the current solar rotation rate. We find that substantial organized global-scale magnetic fields are achieved by dynamo action in this system. Striking wreaths of magnetism are built in the midst of the convection zone, coexisting with the turbulent convection. This is a surprise, for it has been widely believed that such magnetic structures should be disrupted by magnetic buoyancy or turbulent pumping. Thus, many solar dynamo theories have suggested that a tachocline of penetration and shear at the base of the convection zone is a crucial ingredient for organized dynamo action, whereas these simulations do not include such tachoclines. We examine how these persistent magnetic wreaths are maintained by dynamo processes and explore whether a classical mean-field $\alpha$-effect explains the regeneration of poloidal field.
  • When stars like our Sun are young they rotate rapidly and are very magnetically active. We explore dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the 3-D MHD anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code. The magnetic fields built in these dynamos are organized on global-scales into wreath-like structures that span the convection zone. Wreath-building dynamos can undergo quasi-cyclic reversals of polarity and such behavior is common in the parameter space we have been able to explore. These dynamos do not appear to require tachoclines to achieve their spatial or temporal organization. Wreath-building dynamos are present to some degree at all rotation rates, but are most evident in the more rapidly rotating simulations.
  • The NSF's Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship (AAPF) is exceptional among the available postdoctoral awards in Astronomy and Astrophysics. The fellowship is one of the few that allows postdoctoral researchers to pursue an original research program, of their own design, at the U.S. institution of their choice. However, what makes this fellowship truly unique is the ability of Fellows to lead an equally challenging, original educational program simultaneously. The legacy of this singular fellowship has been to encourage and advance leaders in the field who are equally as passionate about their own research as they are about sharing that research and their passion for astronomy with students and the public. In this positional paper we address the importance of fellowships like the AAPF to the astronomical profession by identifying the science and educational contributions that Fellows have made to the community. Further, we recommend that fellowships that encourage leading postdoctoral researchers to also become leaders in Astronomy education be continued and expanded.
  • Popular computational models of visual attention tend to neglect the influence of saccadic eye movements whereas it has been shown that the primates perform on average three of them per seconds and that the neural substrate for the deployment of attention and the execution of an eye movement might considerably overlap. Here we propose a computational model in which the deployment of attention with or without a subsequent eye movement emerges from local, distributed and numerical computations.
  • Stellar dynamos are driven by complex couplings between rotation and turbulent convection, which drive global-scale flows and build and rebuild stellar magnetic fields. When stars like our sun are young, they rotate much more rapidly than the current solar rate. Observations generally indicate that more rapid rotation is correlated with stronger magnetic activity and perhaps more effective dynamo action. Here we examine the effects of more rapid rotation on dynamo action in a star like our sun. We find that vigorous dynamo action is realized, with magnetic field generated throughout the bulk of the convection zone. These simulations do not possess a penetrative tachocline of shear where global-scale fields are thought to be organized in our sun, but despite this we find strikingly ordered fields, much like sea-snakes of toroidal field, which are organized on global scales. We believe this to be a novel finding.
  • Let k be a number field, let E/k be an elliptic curve, and let S be a finite set of places of k contianing the archimedean places. Let F be an algebraic closure of k. We prove that if a point P in E(F) is nontorsion, then there are only finitely many torsion points x in E(F) which are S-integral with respect to P. We also prove an analogue of this for the multiplicative group, and formulate conjectural generalizations for abelian varieties and dynamical systems.
  • We study a single-species polarized Fermi gas tuned across a narrow p-wave Feshbach resonance. We show that in the course of a BEC-BCS crossover the system can undergo a magnetic field-tuned quantum phase transition from a p_x-wave to a p_x+i p_y-wave superfluid. The latter state, that spontaneously breaks time-reversal symmetry, furthermore undergoes a topological p_x+ i p_y to p_x+ i p_y transition at zero chemical potential \mu. In two-dimensions, for \mu>0 it is characterized by a Pfaffian ground state exhibiting topological order and non-Abelian excitations familiar from fractional quantum Hall systems.
  • Motivated by recently discovered unusual properties of bulk nematic elastomers, we study a phase diagram of liquid-crystalline polymerized phantom membranes, focusing on in-plane nematic order. We predict that such membranes should enerically exhibit five phases, distinguished by their conformational and in-plane orientational properties, namely isotropic-crumpled, nematic-crumpled, isotropic-flat, nematic-flat and nematic-tubule phases. In the nematic-tubule phase, the membrane is extended along the direction of {\em spontaneous} nematic order and is crumpled in the other. The associated spontaneous symmetries breaking guarantees that the nematic-tubule is characterized by a conformational-orientational soft (Goldstone) mode and the concomitant vanishing of the in-plane shear modulus. We show that long-range orientational order of the nematic-tubule is maintained even in the presence of harmonic thermal luctuations. However, it is likely that tubule's elastic properties are ualitatively modified by these fluctuations, that can be studied using a nonlinear elastic theory for the nematic tubule phase that we derive at the end of this paper.
  • We present results from axisymmetric, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts. Our main conclusion is that, within the collapsar model, MHD effects alone are able to launch, accelerate and sustain a strong polar outflow. We also find that the outflow is Poynting flux-dominated, and note that this provides favorable initial conditions for the subsequent production of a baryon-poor fireball.
  • We present results from axisymmetric, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts. We begin the simulations after the 1.7 MSUN iron core of a 25 MSUN presupernova star has collapsed and study the ensuing accretion of the 7 MSUN helium envelope onto the central black hole formed by the collapsed iron core. We consider a spherically symmetric progenitor model, but with spherical symmetry broken by the introduction of a small, latitude-dependent angular momentum and a weak radial magnetic field. Our MHD simulations include a realistic equation of state, neutrino cooling, photodisintegration of helium, and resistive heating. Our main conclusion is that, within the collapsar model, MHD effects alone are able to launch, accelerate and sustain a strong polar outflow. We also find that the outflow is Poynting flux-dominated, and note that this provides favorable initial conditions for the subsequent production of a baryon-poor fireball.
  • We examine the significance of the first metal-free stars (Pop III) for the cosmological reionization of HI and HeII. These stars have unusually hard spectra, with the integrated ionizing photon rates from a Pop III stellar cluster for HI and HeII being 1.6 and $10^5$ times stronger respectively than those from a Pop II cluster. For the currently favored cosmology, we find that Pop III stars alone can reionize HI and HeII at redshifts, $z$ of about 9 (4.7) and 5.1 (0.7) for continuous (instantaneous) modes of star formation. More realistic scenarios involving combinations of Pop III and Pop II stellar spectra yield similar results for hydrogen. Helium never reionizes completely in these cases; the ionization fraction of HeIII reaches a maximum of about 60 percent at $z$ of about 5.6 if Pop III star formation lasts for $10^9$ yr. Future data on HI reionization can test the amount of small-scale power available to the formation of the first objects, and provide a constraint on values of $\sigma_8$ less than or about 0.7. Since current UV observations indicate an epoch of reionization for HeII at $z$ of about 3, HeII may reionize more than once. Measurements of the HeII Gunn-Peterson effect in the intergalactic medium at redshifts exceeding about 3 may reveal the significance of Pop III stars for HeII reionization, particularly in void regions that may contain relic ionization from early Pop III stellar activity.
  • We demonstrate three-dimensional (3-D) quenched narrow-line laser cooling and trapping of 40Ca. With 5 ms of cooling time we can transfer 28 % of the atoms from a magneto-optic trap based on the strong 423 nm cooling line to a trap based on the narrow 657 nm clock transition (that is quenched by an intercombination line at 552 nm), thereby reducing the atoms' temperature from 2 millikelvin to 10 microkelvin. This reduction in temperature should help reduce the overall systematic frequency uncertainty for our Ca optical frequency standard to < 1 Hz. Additional pulsed, quenched narrow-line third-stage cooling in 1-D yields sub-recoil temperatures as low as 300 nK, and makes possible the observation of high-contrast two-pulse Ramsey spectroscopic lineshapes.
  • We consider self tuning solutions for a brane embedded in an anti de Sitter spacetime. We include the higher derivative Gauss-Bonnet terms in the action and study singularity free solutions with finite effective Newton's constant. Using the methods of Csaki et al, we prove that such solutions, when exist, always require a fine tuning among the brane parameters. We then present a new method of analysis in which the qualitative features of the solutions can be seen easily without obtaining the solutions explicitly. Also, the origin of the fine tuning is transparent in this method.
  • Magnetic reconnection plays an essential role in the generation and evolution of astrophysical magnetic fields. The best tested and most robust reconnection theory is that of Parker and Sweet. According to this theory, the reconnection rate scales with magnetic diffusivity lambda as lambda^0.5. In the interstellar medium, the Parker-Sweet reconnection rate is far too slow to be of interest. Thus, a mechanism for fast reconnection seems to be required. We have studied the magnetic merging of two oppositely directed flux systems in weakly ionized, but highly conducting, compressible gas. In such systems, ambipolar diffusion steepens the magnetic profile, leading to a thin current sheet. If the ion pressure is small enough, and the recombination of ions is fast enough, the resulting rate of magnetic merging is fast, and independent of lambda. Slow recombination or sufficiently large ion pressure leads to slower merging which scales with lambda as lambda^0.5. We derive a criterion for distinguishing these two regimes, and discuss applications to the weakly ionized ISM and to protoplanetary accretion disks.
  • The generation and evolution of astrophysical magnetic fields occurs largely through the action of turbulence. In many situations, the magnetic field is strong enough to influence many important properties of turbulence itself. Numerical simulation of magnetized turbulence is especially challenging in the astrophysical regime because of the high magnetic Reynolds numbers involved, but some aspects of this difficulty can be avoided in weakly ionized systems.
  • Observational studies indicate that the intergalactic medium (IGM) is highly ionized up to redshifts just over 6. A number of models have been developed to describe the process of reionization and the effects of the ionizing photons from the first luminous objects. In this paper, we study the impact of an X-ray background, such as high-energy photons from early quasars, on the temperature and ionization of the IGM prior to reionization, before the fully ionized bubbles associated with individual sources have overlapped. X-rays, which have large mean free paths relative to EUV photons, and their photoelectrons can have significant effects on the thermal and ionization balance. We find that hydrogen ionization is dominated by the X-ray photoionization of neutral helium and the resulting secondary electrons. Thus, the IGM may have been warm and weakly ionized prior to full reionization. We examine several related consequences, including the filtering of the baryonic Jeans mass scale, signatures in the cosmic microwave background, and the H$^{-}$-catalyzed production of molecular hydrogen.
  • In this paper we derive a simple parametrization of the cycling method developed by us in our earlier work. The new method, called renormalization group (RG) mapping, consists of a series of carefully tuned APE-smearing steps. We study the relation between cycling and RG mapping. We also investigate in detail how smooth instantons and instanton-anti-instanton pairs behave under the RG mapping transformation. We use the RG mapping technique to study the topological susceptibility and instanton size distribution of SU(2) gauge theory. We find scaling in both quantities in a wide range of coupling values. Our result for the topological susceptibility, chi^1/4=220(6) MeV, agrees with our earlier results.
  • We describe quenched spectroscopy in SU(2) gauge theory using smoothed gauge field configurations. We investigate the properties of quarks moving in instanton background field configurations, where the sizes and locations of the instantons are taken from simulations of the full gauge theory. By themselves, these multi-instanton configurations do not confine quarks, but they induce chiral symmetry breaking.
  • Two new Mg II absorbers are presented (z=1.340 in S5 0454+844 and z=1.117 in PKS 2029+121), bringing the total number of Mg II systems in the 1 Jy radio-selected BL Lac sample to 10. Five of the ten absorption systems are at W > 1A; this is a factor of four to five greater than the number expected based upon quasar sightlines, and is 2.5 to 3 sigma greater than the expectation value. Interpretations of this possible excess include either that some of the Mg II absorbers might be intrinsic to the BL Lac or that there is a correlation between the presence of absorbing gas in the foreground and the nearly featureless spectra of these BL Lac Objects compared to quasars. Such a correlation can be created by gravitational microlensing as suggested by Ostriker & Vietri. The similarity between the optical spectra of BL Lacs with Mg II absorption and the spectrum of the Gamma-ray burst source GRB 970508 suggests that models of Gamma-ray bursts as microlensed AGN should be investigated.
  • We report the discovery of nearly a dozen collimated outflows from young stellar objects embedded in the molecular filament that extends north of the Orion Nebula towards the H II region NGC 1977. The large number of nearly co-eval outflows and embedded class-0 young stellar objects indicates that the OMC-2/3 region is one of the most active sites of on-going low to intermediate mass star formation known. These outflows were identified in the 2.12 microns v=1-0 S(1) H_2 line during a survey of a 6 arcmin X 16 arcmin region containing the OMC-2 and OMC-3 cloud cores and over a dozen recently discovered class-0 protostars. We also observe filamentary emission that is likely to trace possible fluorescent H_2 in photo-dissociation regions associated with M 43 and NGC 1977. Neither the suspected outflows nor the fluorescent emission are seen at the continuum wavelength of 2.14 microns which confirms their emission line nature. Several of the new H_2 flows are associated with recently discovered bipolar molecular outflows. However, the most prominent bipolar CO outflow from the region (the MMS 8 flow) has no clear H_2 counterpart. Several H_2 flows consist of chains of knots and compact bow shocks that likely trace highly collimated protostellar jets. Our discovery of more than 80 individual H_2 emitting shocks demonstrate that outflows from young stars are churning this molecular cloud.
  • We study the topological content of the vacuum of SU(2) pure gauge theory using lattice simulations. We use a smoothing process based on the renormalization group equation which removes short distance fluctuations but preserves long distance structure. The action of the smoothed configurations is dominated by instantons, but they still show an area law for Wilson loops with a string tension equal to the string tension on the original configurations. Yet it appears that instantons are not directly responsible for confinement. The average radius of an instanton is about 0.2 fm, at a density of about 2 fm^(-4). This is a much smaller average size than other lattice studies have indicated. The instantons appear not to be randomly distributed in space, but are clustered.