• The 21-cm power spectrum (PS) has been shown to be a powerful discriminant of reionization and cosmic dawn astrophysical parameters. However, the 21-cm tomographic signal is highly non-Gaussian. Therefore there is additional information which is wasted if only the PS is used for parameter recovery. Here we showcase astrophysical parameter recovery directly from 21-cm images, using deep learning with convolutional neural networks (CNN). Using a database of 2D images taken from 10,000 21-cm lightcones (each generated from different cosmological initial conditions), we show that a CNN is able to recover parameters describing the first galaxies: (i) Tvir , their minimum host halo virial temperatures (or masses) capable of hosting efficient star formation; (ii) {\zeta} , their typical ionizing efficiencies; (iii) LX/SFR , their typical soft-band X-ray luminosity to star formation rate; and (iv) E0 , the minimum X-ray energy capable of escaping the galaxy into the IGM. For most of their allowed ranges, log Tvir and log LX/SFR are recovered with < 1% uncertainty, while {\zeta} and E0 are recovered within 10% uncertainty. Our results are roughly comparable to the accuracy obtained from Monte Carlo Markov Chain sampling of the PS with 21CMMC for the two mock observations analyzed previously, although we caution that we do not yet include noise and foreground contaminants in this proof-of-concept study.
  • The cosmic 21 cm signal is set to revolutionise our understanding of the early Universe, allowing us to probe the 3D temperature and ionisation structure of the intergalactic medium (IGM). It will open a window onto the unseen first galaxies, showing us how their UV and X-ray photons drove the cosmic milestones of the epoch of reionisation (EoR) and epoch of heating (EoH). To facilitate parameter inference from the 21 cm signal, we previously developed 21CMMC: a Monte Carlo Markov Chain sampler of 3D EoR simulations. Here we extend 21CMMC to include simultaneous modelling of the EoH, resulting in a complete Bayesian inference framework for the astrophysics dominating the observable epochs of the cosmic 21 cm signal. We demonstrate that second generation interferometers, the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionisation Array (HERA) and Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be able to constrain ionising and X-ray source properties of the first galaxies with a fractional precision of order $\sim1$-10 per cent (1$\sigma$). The ionisation history of the Universe can be constrained to within a few percent. Using our extended framework, we quantify the bias in EoR parameter recovery incurred by the common simplification of a saturated spin temperature in the IGM. Depending on the extent of overlap between the EoR and EoH, the recovered astrophysical parameters can be biased by $\sim3-10\sigma$.
  • We quantify the presence of Ly\alpha\ damping wing absorption from a partially-neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) in the spectrum of the $z=7.08$ QSO, ULASJ1120+0641. Using a Bayesian framework, we simultaneously account for uncertainties in: (i) the intrinsic QSO emission spectrum; and (ii) the distribution of cosmic HI patches during the epoch of reionisation (EoR). For (i) we use a new intrinsic Ly\alpha\ emission line reconstruction method (Greig et al.), sampling a covariance matrix of emission line properties built from a large database of moderate-$z$ QSOs. For (ii), we use the Evolution of 21-cm Structure (EOS; Mesinger et al.) simulations, which span a range of physically-motivated EoR models. We find strong evidence for the presence of damping wing absorption redward of Ly\alpha\ (where there is no contamination from the Ly\alpha\ forest). Our analysis implies that the EoR is not yet complete by $z=7.1$, with the volume-weighted IGM neutral fraction constrained to $\bar{x}_{\rm H\,{\scriptsize I}} = 0.40\substack{+0.21 -0.19}$ at $1\sigma$ ($\bar{x}_{\rm H\,{\scriptsize I}} = 0.40\substack{+0.41 -0.32}$ at $2\sigma$). This result is insensitive to the EoR morphology. Our detection of significant neutral HI in the IGM at $z=7.1$ is consistent with the latest Planck 2016 measurements of the CMB Thompson scattering optical depth (Planck Collaboration XLVII).
  • Using a Bayesian framework, we quantify what current observations imply about the history of the epoch of reionisation (EoR). We use a popular, three-parameter EoR model, flexible enough to accommodate a wide range of physically-plausible reionisation histories. We study the impact of various EoR observations: (i) the optical depth to the CMB measured by Planck 2016; (ii) the dark fraction in the Lyman $\alpha$ and $\beta$ forests; (iii) the redshift evolution of galactic Ly$\alpha$ emission (so-called "Ly$\alpha$ fraction"); (iv) the clustering of Ly$\alpha$ emitters; (v) the IGM damping wing imprint in the spectrum of QSO ULASJ1120+0641; (vi) and the patchy kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal. Combined, (i) and (ii) already place interesting constraints on the reionisation history, with the epochs corresponding to an average neutral fraction of (75, 50, 25) per cent, constrained at 1$\sigma$ to $z= (9.21\substack{+1.22 -1.15}, 8.14\substack{+1.08 -1.00}, 7.26\substack{+1.13 -0.96})$. Folding-in more model-dependent EoR observations [(iii--vi)], strengthens these constraints by tens of per cent, at the cost of a decrease in the likelihood of the best-fit model, driven mostly by (iii). The tightest constraints come from (v). Unfortunately, no current observational set is sufficient to break degeneracies and constrain the astrophysical EoR parameters. However, model-dependent priors on the EoR parameters themselves can be used to set tight limits by excluding regions of parameter space with strong degeneracies. Motivated by recent observations of $z\sim7$ faint, lensed galaxies, we show how a conservative upper limit on the virial temperature of haloes which host reionising galaxies can constrain the escape fraction of ionising photons to $f_{\rm esc} = 0.14\substack{+0.26 -0.09}$
  • Foreground power dominates the measurements of interferometers that seek a statistical detection of highly-redshifted HI emission from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). The inherent spectral smoothness of synchrotron radiation, the dominant foreground emission mechanism, and the chromaticity of the instrument allows these experiments to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth and structured emission in Fourier space (the "wedge" or "pitchfork", and the "EoR Window", respectively). Faraday rotation can inject spectral structure into otherwise smooth polarized foreground emission, which through instrument effects or miscalibration could possibly pollute the EoR Window. Using data from the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) 19-element commissioning array, we investigate the polarization response of this new instrument in the power spectrum domain. We confirm the expected structure of foreground emission in Fourier space predicted by Thyagarajan et al. (2015a, 2016) for a HERA-type dish, and detect polarized power within the pitchfork. Using simulations of the polarized response of HERA feeds, we find that almost all of the power in Stokes Q, U and V can be attributed to instrumental leakage effects. Power consistent with noise in the EoR window suggests a negligible amount of spectrally-structured polarized power, to the noise-levels attained. This lends confidence to deep integrations with HERA in the future, but with a lower noise floor these future studies will also have to investigate their polarized response.
  • We extend 21CMMC, a Monte Carlo Markov Chain sampler of 3D reionisation simulations, to perform parameter estimation directly on 3D light-cones of the cosmic 21cm signal. This brings theoretical analysis closer to the tomographic 21-cm observations achievable with next generation interferometers like HERA and the SKA. Parameter recovery can therefore account for modes which evolve with redshift/frequency. Additionally, simulated data can be more easily corrupted to resemble real data. Using the light-cone version of 21CMMC, we quantify the biases in the recovered astrophysical parameters if we use the 21cm power spectrum from the co-evolution approximation to fit a 3D light-cone mock observation. While ignoring the light-cone effect under most assumptions will not significantly bias the recovered astrophysical parameters, it can lead to an underestimation of the associated uncertainty. However significant biases ($\sim$few -- 10 $\sigma$) can occur if the 21cm signal evolves rapidly (i.e. the epochs of reionisation and heating overlap significantly) and: (i) foreground removal is very efficient, allowing large physical scales ($k\lesssim0.1$~Mpc$^{-1}$) to be used in the analysis or (ii) theoretical modelling is accurate to within $\sim10$ per cent in the power spectrum amplitude.
  • Current and upcoming radio interferometric experiments are aiming to make a statistical characterization of the high-redshift 21cm fluctuation signal spanning the hydrogen reionization and X-ray heating epochs of the universe. However, connecting 21cm statistics to underlying physical parameters is complicated by the theoretical challenge of modeling the relevant physics at computational speeds quick enough to enable exploration of the high dimensional and weakly constrained parameter space. In this work, we use machine learning algorithms to build a fast emulator that mimics expensive simulations of the 21cm signal across a wide parameter space to high precision. We embed our emulator within a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo framework, enabling it to explore the posterior distribution over a large number of model parameters, including those that govern the Epoch of Reionization, the Epoch of X-ray Heating, and cosmology. As a worked example, we use our emulator to present an updated parameter constraint forecast for the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array experiment, showing that its characterization of a fiducial 21cm power spectrum will considerably narrow the allowed parameter space of reionization and heating parameters, and could help strengthen Planck's constraints on $\sigma_8$. We provide both our generalized emulator code and its implementation specifically for 21cm parameter constraints as publicly available software.
  • The experimental efforts to detect the redshifted 21 cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) are limited predominantly by the chromatic instrumental systematic effect. The delay spectrum methodology for 21 cm power spectrum measurements brought new attention to the critical impact of an antenna's chromaticity on the viability of making this measurement. This methodology established a straightforward relationship between time-domain response of an instrument and the power spectrum modes accessible to a 21 cm EoR experiment. We examine the performance of a prototype of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) array element that is currently observing in Karoo desert, South Africa. We present a mathematical framework to derive the beam integrated frequency response of a HERA prototype element in reception from the return loss measurements between 100-200 MHz and determined the extent of additional foreground contamination in the delay space. The measurement reveals excess spectral structures in comparison to the simulation studies of the HERA element. Combined with the HERA data analysis pipeline that incorporates inverse covariance weighting in optimal quadratic estimation of power spectrum, we find that in spite of its departure from the simulated response, HERA prototype element satisfies the necessary criteria posed by the foreground attenuation limits and potentially can measure the power spectrum at spatial modes as low as $k_{\parallel} > 0.1h$~Mpc$^{-1}$. The work highlights a straightforward method for directly measuring an instrument response and assessing its impact on 21 cm EoR power spectrum measurements for future experiments that will use reflector-type antenna.
  • We introduce an intrinsic Ly\alpha\ emission line profile reconstruction method for high-$z$ quasars (QSOs). This approach utilises a covariance matrix of emission line properties obtained from a large, moderate-$z$ ($2 \leq z \leq 2.5$), high signal to noise (S/N > 15) sample of BOSS QSOs. For each QSO, we complete a Monte Carlo Markov Chain fitting of the continuum and emission line properties and perform a visual quality assessment to construct a large database of robustly fit spectra. With this dataset, we construct a covariance matrix to describe the correlations between the high ionisation emission lines Ly\alpha, C IV, Si IV + O IV] and C III], and find it to be well approximated by an $N$-dimensional Gaussian distribution. This covariance matrix characterises the correlations between the line width, peak height and velocity offset from systemic while also allowing for the existence of broad and narrow line components for Ly\alpha\ and C IV. We illustrate how this covariance matrix allows us to statistically characterise the intrinsic Ly\alpha\ line solely from the observed spectrum redward of 1275\AA. This procedure can be used to reconstruct the intrinsic Ly\alpha\ line emission profile in cases where Ly\alpha\ may otherwise be obscured. Applying this reconstruction method to our sample of QSOs, we recovered the Ly\alpha\ line flux to within 15 per cent of the measured flux at 1205\AA\ (1220\AA) ~85 (90) per cent of the time.
  • We study the redshift evolution of the quasar UV Luminosity Function (LF) for 0.5 < z < 6.5, by collecting the most up to date observational data and, in particular, the recently discovered population of faint AGNs. We fit the QSO LF using either a double power-law or a Schechter function, finding that both forms provide good fits to the data. We derive empirical relations for the LF parameters as a function of redshift and, based on these results, predict the quasar UV LF at z=8. From the inferred LF evolution, we compute the redshift evolution of the QSO/AGN comoving ionizing emissivity and hydrogen photoionization rate. If faint AGNs are included, the contribution of quasars to reionization increases substantially. However, their level of contribution critically depends on the detailed shape of the QSO LF, which can be constrained by efficient searches of high-z quasars. To this aim, we predict the expected (i) number of z>6 quasars detectable by ongoing and future NIR surveys (as EUCLID and WFIRST), and (ii) number counts for a single radio-recombination line observation with SKA-MID (FoV = 0.49 deg^2) as a function of the Hnalpha flux density, at 0<z<8. These surveys (even at z<6) will be fundamental to better constrain the role of quasars as reionization sources.
  • The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a staged experiment to measure 21 cm emission from the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM) throughout cosmic reionization ($z=6-12$), and to explore earlier epochs of our Cosmic Dawn ($z\sim30$). During these epochs, early stars and black holes heated and ionized the IGM, introducing fluctuations in 21 cm emission. HERA is designed to characterize the evolution of the 21 cm power spectrum to constrain the timing and morphology of reionization, the properties of the first galaxies, the evolution of large-scale structure, and the early sources of heating. The full HERA instrument will be a 350-element interferometer in South Africa consisting of 14-m parabolic dishes observing from 50 to 250 MHz. Currently, 19 dishes have been deployed on site and the next 18 are under construction. HERA has been designated as an SKA Precursor instrument. In this paper, we summarize HERA's scientific context and provide forecasts for its key science results. After reviewing the current state of the art in foreground mitigation, we use the delay-spectrum technique to motivate high-level performance requirements for the HERA instrument. Next, we present the HERA instrument design, along with the subsystem specifications that ensure that HERA meets its performance requirements. Finally, we summarize the schedule and status of the project. We conclude by suggesting that, given the realities of foreground contamination, current-generation 21 cm instruments are approaching their sensitivity limits. HERA is designed to bring both the sensitivity and the precision to deliver its primary science on the basis of proven foreground filtering techniques, while developing new subtraction techniques to unlock new capabilities. The result will be a major step toward realizing the widely recognized scientific potential of 21 cm cosmology.
  • We present upper limits on the 21 cm power spectrum at $z = 5.9$ calculated from the model-independent limit on the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium of $x_{\rm H{\small I }} < 0.06 + 0.05\ (1\sigma)$ derived from dark pixel statistics of quasar absorption spectra. Using 21CMMC, a Markov chain Monte Carlo Epoch of Reionization analysis code, we explore the probability distribution of 21 cm power spectra consistent with this constraint on the neutral fraction. We present 99 per cent confidence upper limits of $\Delta^2(k) < 10$ to $20\ {\rm mK}^2$ over a range of $k$ from 0.5 to $2.0\ h{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, with the exact limit dependent on the sampled $k$ mode. This limit can be used as a null test for 21 cm experiments: a detection of power at $z=5.9$ in excess of this value is highly suggestive of residual foreground contamination or other systematic errors affecting the analysis.
  • We introduce the Evolution of 21-cm Structure (EOS) project: providing periodic, public releases of the latest cosmological 21-cm simulations. 21-cm interferometry is set to revolutionize studies of the Cosmic Dawn (CD) and epoch of reionization (EoR), eventually resulting in 3D maps of the first billion years of our Universe. Progress will depend on sophisticated data analysis pipelines, which are in turn tested on large-scale mock observations. Here we present the 2016 EOS data release, consisting of the largest (1.6 Gpc on side with a 1024^3 grid), public 21-cm simulations of the CD and EoR. We include calibrated, sub-grid prescriptions for inhomogeneous recombinations and photo-heating suppression of star formation in small mass galaxies. We present two simulation runs that approximately bracket the contribution from faint unseen galaxies. From these two extremes, we predict that the duration of reionization (defined as a change in the mean neutral fraction from 0.9 to 0.1) should be between 2.7 < Delta z < 5.7. The large-scale 21-cm power during the advanced EoR stages can be different by up to a factor of ~10, depending on the model. This difference has a comparable contribution from: (i) the typical bias of sources; and (ii) a more efficient negative feedback in models with an extended EoR driven by faint galaxies. We also make detectability forecasts. With a 1000h integration, HERA and SKA1-low should achieve a signal-to-noise of ~few-hundreds throughout the EoR/CD, while in the maximally optimistic scenario of perfect foreground cleaning, all instruments should make a statistical detection of the cosmic signal. We also caution that our ability to clean foregrounds determines the relative performance of narrow/deep vs. wide/shallow surveys expected with SKA1. Our 21-cm power spectra, simulation outputs and visualizations are publicly available.
  • Interferometry of the cosmic 21-cm signal is set to revolutionize our understanding of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR), eventually providing 3D maps of the early Universe. Initial detections however will be low signal-to-noise, limited by systematics. To confirm a putative 21-cm detection, and check the accuracy of 21-cm data analysis pipelines, it would be very useful to cross-correlate against a genuine cosmological signal. The most promising cosmological signals are wide-field maps of Lyman alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs), expected from the Subaru Hyper-Suprime Cam (HSC) Ultra-Deep field. Here we present estimates of the correlation between LAE maps at z~7 and the 21-cm signal observed by both the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) and the planned Square Kilometer Array Phase 1 (SKA1). We adopt a systematic approach, varying both: (i) the prescription of assigning LAEs to host halos; and (ii) the large-scale structure of neutral and ionized regions (i.e. EoR morphology). We find that the LAE-21cm cross-correlation is insensitive to (i), thus making it a robust probe of the EoR. A 1000h observation with LOFAR would be sufficient to discriminate at >1 standard deviation a fully ionized Universe from one with a mean neutral fraction of xHI~0.50, using the LAE-21cm cross-correlation function on scales of R~3-10 Mpc. Unlike LOFAR, whose detection of the LAE-21cm cross-correlation is limited by noise, SKA1 is mostly limited by ignorance of the EoR morphology. However, the planned 100h wide-field SKA1-Low survey will be sufficient to discriminate an ionized Universe from one with xHI~0.25, even with maximally pessimistic assumptions.
  • We compute robust lower limits on the spin temperature, $T_{\rm S}$, of the $z=8.4$ intergalactic medium (IGM), implied by the upper limits on the 21-cm power spectrum recently measured by PAPER-64. Unlike previous studies which used a single epoch of reionization (EoR) model, our approach samples a large parameter space of EoR models: the dominant uncertainty when estimating constraints on $T_{\rm S}$. Allowing $T_{\rm S}$ to be a free parameter and marginalizing over EoR parameters in our Markov Chain Monte Carlo code 21CMMC, we infer $T_{\rm S}\ge3 {\rm K}$ (corresponding approximately to $1\sigma$) for a mean IGM neutral fraction of $\bar{x}_{\rm H{\scriptsize I}}\gtrsim0.1$. We further improve on these limits by folding-in additional EoR constraints based on: (i) the dark fraction in QSO spectra, which implies a strict upper limit of $\bar{x}_{\rm H{\scriptsize I}}[z=5.9]\leq 0.06+0.05 \,(1\sigma)$; and (ii) the electron scattering optical depth, $\tau_{\rm e}=0.066\pm0.016\,(1\sigma)$ measured by the Planck satellite. By restricting the allowed EoR models, these additional observations tighten the approximate $1\sigma$ lower limits on the spin temperature to $T_{\rm S} \ge 6$ K. Thus, even such preliminary 21-cm observations begin to rule out extreme scenarios such as `cold reionization', implying at least some prior heating of the IGM. The analysis framework developed here can be applied to upcoming 21-cm observations, thereby providing unique insights into the sources which heated and subsequently reionized the very early Universe.
  • With the first phase of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA1) entering into its final pre-construction phase, we investigate how best to maximise its scientific return. Specifically, we focus on the statistical measurement of the 21 cm power spectrum (PS) from the epoch of reionization (EoR) using the low frequency array, SKA1-low. To facilitate this investigation we use the recently developed MCMC based EoR analysis tool 21CMMC (Greig & Mesinger). In light of the recent 50 per cent cost reduction, we consider several different SKA core baseline designs, changing: (i) the number of antenna stations; (ii) the number of dipoles per station; and also (iii) the distribution of baseline lengths. We find that a design with a reduced number of dipoles per core station (increased field of view and total number of core stations), together with shortened baselines, maximises the recovered EoR signal. With this optimal baseline design, we investigate three observing strategies, analysing the trade-off between lowering the instrumental thermal noise against increasing the field of view. SKA1-low intends to perform a three tiered observing approach, including a deep 100 deg$^{2}$ at 1000 h, a medium-deep 1000 deg$^{2}$ at 100 h and a shallow 10,000 deg$^{2}$ at 10 h survey. We find that the three observing strategies result in comparable ($\lesssim$ per cent) constraints on our EoR astrophysical parameters. This is contrary to naive predictions based purely on the total signal-to-noise, thus highlighting the need to use EoR parameter constraints as a figure of merit, in order to maximise scientific returns with next generation interferometers.
  • We introduce 21CMMC: a parallelized, Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis tool, incorporating the epoch of reionization (EoR) seminumerical simulation 21CMFAST. 21CMMC estimates astrophysical parameter constraints from 21 cm EoR experiments, accommodating a variety of EoR models, as well as priors on model parameters and the reionization history. To illustrate its utility, we consider two different EoR scenarios, one with a single population of galaxies (with a mass-independent ionizing efficiency) and a second, more general model with two different, feedback-regulated populations (each with mass-dependent ionizing efficiencies). As an example, combining three observations (z=8, 9 and 10) of the 21 cm power spectrum with a conservative noise estimate and uniform model priors, we find that interferometers with specifications like the Low Frequency Array/Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA)/Square Kilometre Array 1 (SKA1) can constrain common reionization parameters: the ionizing efficiency (or similarly the escape fraction), the mean free path of ionizing photons and the log of the minimum virial temperature of star-forming haloes to within 45.3/22.0/16.7, 33.5/18.4/17.8 and 6.3/3.3/2.4 per cent, ~$1\sigma$ fractional uncertainty, respectively. Instead, if we optimistically assume that we can perfectly characterize the EoR modelling uncertainties, we can improve on these constraints by up to a factor of ~few. Similarly, the fractional uncertainty on the average neutral fraction can be constrained to within $\lesssim10$ per cent for HERA and SKA1. By studying the resulting impact on astrophysical constraints, 21CMMC can be used to optimize (i) interferometer designs; (ii) foreground cleaning algorithms; (iii) observing strategies; (iv) alternative statistics characterizing the 21 cm signal; and (v) synergies with other observational programs.
  • We develop a semi-analytic method for assessing the impact of the large-scale IGM temperature fluctuations expected following He${\rm\,{\scriptstyle II}}$ reionization on three-dimensional clustering measurements of the Ly$\alpha$ forest. Our methodology builds upon the existing large volume, mock Ly$\alpha$ forest survey simulations presented by Greig et al. by including a prescription for a spatially inhomogeneous ionizing background, temperature fluctuations induced by patchy He${\rm\,{\scriptstyle II}}$ photoheating and the clustering of quasars. This approach enables us to achieve a dynamic range within our semi-analytic model substantially larger than currently feasible with computationally expensive, fully numerical simulations. The results agree well with existing numerical simulations, with large-scale temperature fluctuations introducing a scale-dependent increase in the spherically averaged 3D Ly$\alpha$ forest power spectrum of up to 20-30 per cent at wavenumbers $k\sim0.02$ Mpc$^{-1}$. Although these large-scale thermal fluctuations will not substantially impact upon the recovery of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale from existing and forthcoming dark energy spectroscopic surveys, any complete forward modelling of the broad-band term in the Ly$\alpha$ correlation function will none the less require their inclusion.
  • The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will offer an unprecedented view onto the early Universe, using interferometric observations of the redshifted 21cm line. The 21cm line probes the thermal and ionization state of the cosmic gas, which is governed by the birth and evolution of the first structures in our Universe. Here we show how the evolution of the 21cm signal will allow us to study when the first generations of galaxies appeared, what were their properties, and what was the structure of the intergalactic medium. We highlight qualitative trends which will offer robust insights into the early Universe.
  • Large surveys for Lyman-alpha emitting (LAE) galaxies have been proposed as a new method for measuring clustering of the galaxy population at high redshift with the goal of determining cosmological parameters. However, Lyman-alpha radiative transfer effects may modify the observed clustering of LAE galaxies in a way that mimics gravitational effects, potentially reducing the precision of cosmological constraints. For example, the effect of the linear redshift-space distortion on the power spectrum of LAE galaxies is potentially degenerate with Lyman-alpha radiative transfer effects owing to the dependence of observed flux on intergalactic medium velocity gradients. In this paper, we show that the three-point function (bispectrum) can distinguish between gravitational and non-gravitational effects, and thus breaks these degeneracies, making it possible to recover cosmological parameters from LAE galaxy surveys. Constraints on the angular diameter distance and the Hubble expansion rate can also be improved by combining power spectrum and bispectrum measurements.
  • High redshift measurements of the baryonic acoustic oscillation scale (BAO) from large Ly-alpha forest surveys represent the next frontier of dark energy studies. As part of this effort, efficient simulations of the BAO signature from the Ly-alpha forest will be required. We construct a model for producing fast, large volume simulations of the Ly-alpha forest for this purpose. Utilising a calibrated semi-analytic approach, we are able to run very large simulations in 1 Gpc^3 volumes which fully resolve the Jeans scale in less than a day on a desktop PC using a GPU enabled version of our code. The Ly-alpha forest spectra extracted from our semi-analytical simulations are in excellent agreement with those obtained from a fully hydrodynamical reference simulation. Furthermore, we find our simulated data are in broad agreement with observational measurements of the flux probability distribution and 1D flux power spectrum. We are able to correctly recover the input BAO scale from the 3D Ly-alpha flux power spectrum measured from our simulated data, and estimate that a BOSS-like 10^4 deg^2 survey with ~15 background sources per square degree and a signal-to-noise of ~5 per pixel should achieve a measurement of the BAO scale to within ~1.4 per cent. We also use our simulations to provide simple power-law expressions for estimating the fractional error on the BAO scale on varying the signal-to-noise and the number density of background sources. The speed and flexibility of our approach is well suited for exploring parameter space and the impact of observational and astrophysical systematics on the recovery of the BAO signature from forthcoming large scale spectroscopic surveys.