• The goal of this paper is to contrast and survey the major advances in two of the most commonly used high-dimensional techniques, namely, the Lasso and horseshoe regularization. Lasso is a gold standard for predictor selection while horseshoe is a state-of-the-art Bayesian estimator for sparse signals. Lasso is fast and scalable and uses convex optimization whilst the horseshoe is non-convex. Our novel perspective focuses on three aspects: (i) theoretical optimality in high dimensional inference for the Gaussian sparse model and beyond, (ii) efficiency and scalability of computation and (iii) methodological development and performance.
  • We provide a framework for assessing the default nature of a prior distribution using the property of regular variation, which we study for global-local shrinkage priors. In particular, we demonstrate the horseshoe priors, originally designed to handle sparsity, also possess regular variation and thus are appropriate for default Bayesian analysis. To illustrate our methodology, we solve a problem of non-informative priors due to Efron (1973), who showed standard flat non-informative priors in high-dimensional normal means model can be highly informative for nonlinear parameters of interest. We consider four such problems and show global-local shrinkage priors such as the horseshoe and horseshoe+ perform as Efron (1973) requires in each case. We find the reason for this lies in the ability of the global-local shrinkage priors to separate a low-dimensional signal embedded in high-dimensional noise, even for nonlinear functions.
  • In this paper we develop a statistical theory and an implementation of deep learning models. We show that an elegant variable splitting scheme for the alternating direction method of multipliers optimises a deep learning objective. We allow for non-smooth non-convex regularisation penalties to induce sparsity in parameter weights. We provide a link between traditional shallow layer statistical models such as principal component and sliced inverse regression and deep layer models. We also define the degrees of freedom of a deep learning predictor and a predictive MSE criteria to perform model selection for comparing architecture designs. We focus on deep multiclass logistic learning although our methods apply more generally. Our results suggest an interesting and previously under-exploited relationship between deep learning and proximal splitting techniques. To illustrate our methodology, we provide a multi-class logit classification analysis of Fisher's Iris data where we illustrate the convergence of our algorithm. Finally, we conclude with directions for future research.
  • In this paper we develop proximal methods for statistical learning. Proximal point algorithms are useful in statistics and machine learning for obtaining optimization solutions for composite functions. Our approach exploits closed-form solutions of proximal operators and envelope representations based on the Moreau, Forward-Backward, Douglas-Rachford and Half-Quadratic envelopes. Envelope representations lead to novel proximal algorithms for statistical optimisation of composite objective functions which include both non-smooth and non-convex objectives. We illustrate our methodology with regularized Logistic and Poisson regression and non-convex bridge penalties with a fused lasso norm. We provide a discussion of convergence of non-descent algorithms with acceleration and for non-convex functions. Finally, we provide directions for future research.