• We introduce a multiscale framework which combines time-dependent nonequilibrium Green function (TD-NEGF) algorithms, scaling linearly in the number of time steps and describing quantum-mechanically conduction electrons in the presence of time-dependent fields of arbitrary strength or frequency, with classical time evolution of local magnetic moments described by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. Our TD-NEGF+LLG framework can be applied to a variety of problems where current-driven spin torque induces dynamics of magnetic moments as the key resource for next generation spintronics. Previous approaches to such nonequilibrium many-body system have neglected noncommutativity of a quantum Hamiltonian of conduction electrons at different times and, therefore, the impact of time-dependent magnetic moments on electrons which induce pumping of spin and charge currents that, in turn, can self-consistently affect the dynamics of magnetic moments themselves. Using magnetic domain wall (DW) as an example, we predict that its motion will pump time-dependent spin and charge currents (on the top of unpolarized DC charge current injected through normal metal leads to drive the DW motion), where the latter can be viewed as a realization of nonadiabatic quantum charge pumping due to time-dependence of the Hamiltonian and left-right symmetry breaking of the two-terminal device structure. The conversion of AC components of spin current, whose amplitude increases (decreases) as the DW approaches (distances from) the normal metal lead, into AC voltage via the inverse spin Hall effect offers a tool to precisely track the DW position along magnetic nanowire. We also quantify the DW transient inertial displacement due to its acceleration and deceleration by pulse current and the entailed spin and charge pumping.
  • We review a unified approach for computing: (i) spin-transfer torque in magnetic trilayers like spin-valves and magnetic tunnel junction, where injected charge current flows perpendicularly to interfaces; and (ii) spin-orbit torque in magnetic bilayers of the type ferromagnet/spin-orbit-coupled-material, where injected charge current flows parallel to the interface. Our approach requires to construct the torque operator for a given Hamiltonian of the device and the steady-state nonequilibrium density matrix, where the latter is expressed in terms of the nonequilibrium Green's functions and split into three contributions. Tracing these contributions with the torque operator automatically yields field-like and damping-like components of spin-transfer torque or spin-orbit torque vector, which is particularly advantageous for spin-orbit torque where the direction of these components depends on the unknown-in-advance orientation of the current-driven nonequilibrium spin density in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. We provide illustrative examples by computing spin-transfer torque in a one-dimensional toy model of a magnetic tunnel junction and realistic Co/Cu/Co spin-valve, both of which are described by first-principles Hamiltonians obtained from noncollinear density functional theory calculations; as well as spin-orbit torque in a ferromagnetic layer described by a tight-binding Hamiltonian which includes spin-orbit proximity effect within ferromagnetic monolayers assumed to be generated by the adjacent monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide.
  • We demonstrate that a Meijer-G-function-based resummation approach can be successfully applied to approximate the Borel sum of divergent series, and thus to approximate the Borel-\'Ecalle summation of resurgent transseries in quantum field theory (QFT). The proposed method is shown to vastly outperform the conventional Borel-Pad\'e and Borel-Pad\'e-\'Ecalle summation methods. The resulting Meijer-G approximants are easily parameterized by means of a hypergeometric ansatz and can be thought of as a generalization to arbitrary order of the Borel-Hypergeometric method [Mera {\it et al.} Phys. Rev. Lett. {\bf 115}, 143001 (2015)]. Here we illustrate the ability of this technique in various examples from QFT, traditionally employed as benchmark models for resummation, such as: 0-dimensional $\phi^4$ theory, $\phi^4$ with degenerate minima, self-interacting QFT in 0-dimensions, and the computation of one- and two-instanton contributions in the quantum-mechanical double-well problem.
  • Spin-memory loss (SML) of electrons traversing ferromagnetic-metal/heavy-metal (FM/HM), FM/normal-metal (FM/NM) and HM/NM interfaces is a fundamental phenomenon that must be invoked to explain consistently large number of spintronic experiments. However, its strength extracted by fitting experimental data to phenomenological semiclassical theory, which replaces each interface by a fictitious bulk layer, is poorly understood from a microscopic quantum framework and/or materials properties. Here we describe ensemble of flowing spin quantum states using spin-density matrix, so that SML is measured like any decoherence process by the decay of its off-diagonal elements or, equivalently, by the reduction of the magnitude of polarization vector. By combining this framework with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we examine how all three components of the polarization vector change at Co/Ta, Co/Pt, Co/Cu, Pt/Cu and Pt/Au interfaces embedded within Cu/FM/HM/Cu vertical heterostructures. In addition, we use ab initio Green's functions to compute spectral function and spin texture over FM, HM and NM monolayers around these interfaces which quantify interfacial spin-orbit coupling, thereby explaining the microscopic origin of SML in long-standing puzzles---such as why it is nonzero at Co/Cu interface; why it is very large at Pt/Cu interface; and why it occurs at perfect interfaces without any interfacial intermixing.
  • Recent experiments reporting unexpectedly large spin Hall effect (SHE) in graphene decorated with adatoms have raised a fierce controversy. We apply numerically exact Kubo and Landauer- Buttiker formulas to realistic models of gold-decorated disordered graphene (including adatom clustering) to obtain the spin Hall conductivity and spin Hall angle, as well as the nonlocal resistance as a quantity accessible to experiments. Large spin Hall angles of 0.1 are obtained at zero-temperature, but their dependence on adatom clustering differs from the predictions of semiclassical transport theories. Furthermore, we find multiple background contributions to the nonlocal resistance, some of which are unrelated to SHE or any other spin-dependent origin, as well as a strong suppression of SHE at room temperature. This motivates us to design a multiterminal graphene geometry which suppresses these background contributions and could, therefore, quantify the upper limit for spin current generation in two-dimensional materials.
  • The discovery of the integer quantum Hall effect in the early eighties of the last century, with highly precise quantization values for the Hall conductance in multiples of $e^2/h$, has been the first fascinating manifestation of the topological state of matter driven by magnetic field and disorder, and related to the formation of non-dissipative current flow. In 2005, several new phenomena such as the spin Hall effect and the quantum spin Hall effect were predicted in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling and vanishing external magnetic field. More recently, the Zeeman spin Hall effect and the formation of valley Hall topological currents have been introduced for graphene-based systems, under time-reversal or inversion symmetry-breaking conditions, respectively. This review presents a comprehensive coverage of all these Hall effects in disordered graphene from the perspective of numerical simulations of quantum transport in two-dimensional bulk systems (by means of the Kubo formalism) and multiterminal nanostructures (by means of the Landauer-B\"{u}ttiker scattering and nonequilibrium Green function approaches). In contrast to usual two-dimensional electron gases, the presence of defects in graphene generates more complex electronic features such as electron-hole asymmetry, defect resonances or percolation effect between localized impurity states, which, together with extra degrees of freedom (sublattice pseudospin, valley isospin), bring a higher degree of complexity and enlarge the transport phase diagram.
  • Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we predict that a monolayer of OsCl$_3$---a layered material whose interlayer coupling is weaker than in graphite---possesses a quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) insulating phase generated by the combination of honeycomb lattice of osmium atoms, their strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and ferromagnetic ground state with {\em in-plane} easy-axis. The band gap opened by SOC is \mbox{$E_g \simeq 67$ meV} (or \mbox{$\simeq 191$ meV} if the easy-axis can be tilted out of the plane by an external electric field), and the estimated Curie temperature of such {\em anisotropic planar rotator} ferromagnet is $T_\mathrm{C} \lesssim 350$ K. The Chern number $\mathcal{C}=-1$, generated by the manifold of Os $t_{2g}$ bands crossing the Fermi energy, signifies the presence of a single chiral edge state in nanoribbons of finite width, where we further show that edge states are spatially narrower for zigzag than armchair edges and investigate edge-state transport in the presence of vacancies at Os sites. Since $5d$ electrons of Os exhibit {\em both} strong SOC and moderate correlation effects, we employ DFT+U calculations to show how increasing on-site Coulomb repulsion $U$: gradually reduces $E_g$ while maintaining $\mathcal{C} = -1$ for $0 < U < U_c$; leads to metallic phase with $E_g = 0$ at $U_c$; and opens the gap of topologically trivial Mott insulating phase with $\mathcal{C}=0$ for $U > U_c$.
  • Motivated by recent experiments observing spin-orbit torque (SOT) acting on the magnetization $\vec{m}$ of a ferromagnetic (F) overlayer on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), we investigate the origin of the SOT and the magnetization dynamics in such systems. We predict that lateral F/TI bilayers of finite length, sandwiched between two normal metal leads, will generate a large antidamping-like SOT per very low charge current injected parallel to the interface. The large values of antidamping-like SOT are {\it spatially localized} around the transverse edges of the F overlayer. Our analysis is based on adiabatic expansion (to first order in $\partial \vec{m}/\partial t$) of time-dependent nonequilibrium Green functions (NEGFs), describing electrons pushed out of equilibrium both by the applied bias voltage and by the slow variation of a classical degree of freedom [such as $\vec{m}(t)$]. From it we extract formulas for spin torque and charge pumping, which show that they are reciprocal effects to each other, as well as Gilbert damping in the presence of SO coupling. The NEGF-based formula for SOT naturally splits into four components, determined by their behavior (even or odd) under the time and bias voltage reversal. Their complex angular dependence is delineated and employed within Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations of magnetization dynamics in order to demonstrate capability of the predicted SOT to efficiently switch $\vec{m}$ of a perpendicularly magnetized F overlayer.
  • A newly developed hypergeometric resummation technique [H. Mera et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 143001 (2015)] provides an easy-to-use recipe to obtain conserving approximations within the self-consistent nonequilibrium many-body perturbation theory. We demonstrate the usefulness of this technique by calculating the phonon-limited electronic current in a model of a single-molecule junction within the self-consistent Born approximation for the electron-phonon interacting system, where the perturbation expansion for the nonequilibrium Green function in powers of the free bosonic propagator typically consists of a series of non-crossing \sunset" diagrams. Hypergeometric resummation preserves conservation laws and it is shown to provide substantial convergence acceleration relative to more standard approaches to self-consistency. This result strongly suggests that the convergence of the self-consistent \sunset" series is limited by a branch-cut singularity, which is accurately described by Gauss hypergeometric functions. Our results showcase an alternative approach to conservation laws and self-consistency where expectation values obtained from conserving perturbation expansions are \summed" to their self-consistent value by analytic continuation functions able to mimic the convergence-limiting singularity structure.
  • Studies of atomic systems in electric fields are challenging because of the diverging perturbation series. However, physically meaningful Stark shifts and ionization rates can be found by analytical continuation of the series using appropriate branch cut functions. We apply this approach to low-dimensional hydrogen atoms in order to study the effects of reduced dimensionality. We find that modifications by the electric field are strongly suppressed in reduced dimensions. This finding is explained from a Landau-type analysis of the ionization process.
  • We predict that unpolarized charge current injected into a ballistic thin film of prototypical topological insulator (TI) Bi$_2$Se$_3$ will generate a {\it noncollinear spin texture} $\mathbf{S}(\mathbf{r})$ on its surface. Furthermore, the nonequilibrium spin texture will extend into $\simeq 2$ nm thick layer below the TI surfaces due to penetration of evanescent wavefunctions from the metallic surfaces into the bulk of TI. Averaging $\mathbf{S}(\mathbf{r})$ over few \AA{} along the longitudinal direction defined by the current flow reveals large component pointing in the transverse direction. In addition, we find an order of magnitude smaller out-of-plane component when the direction of injected current with respect to Bi and Se atoms probes the largest hexagonal warping of the Dirac-cone dispersion on TI surface. Our analysis is based on an extension of the nonequilibrium Green functions combined with density functional theory (NEGF+DFT) to situations involving noncollinear spins and spin-orbit coupling. We also demonstrate how DFT calculations with properly optimized local orbital basis set can precisely match putatively more accurate calculations with plane-wave basis set for the supercell of Bi$_2$Se$_3$.
  • The Stark effect in hydrogen and the cubic anharmonic oscillator furnish examples of quantum systems where the perturbation results in a certain ionization probability by tunneling processes. Accordingly, the perturbed ground-state energy is shifted and broadened, thus acquiring an imaginary part which is considered to be a paradigm of nonperturbative behavior. Here we demonstrate how the low order coefficients of a divergent perturbation series can be used to obtain excellent approximations to both real and imaginary parts of the perturbed ground state eigenenergy. The key is to use analytic continuation functions with a built in analytic structure within the complex plane of the coupling constant, which is tailored by means of Bender-Wu dispersion relations. In the examples discussed the analytic continuation functions are Gauss hypergeometric functions, which take as input fourth order perturbation theory and return excellent approximations to the complex perturbed eigenvalue. These functions are Borel-consistent and dramatically outperform widely used Pad\'e and Borel-Pad\'e approaches, even for rather large values of the coupling constant.
  • Using first-principles quantum transport simulations, based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism combined with density functional theory (NEGF+DFT), we examine changes in the total and local electronic currents within the plane of graphene nanoribbon with zigzag edges (ZGNR) hosting a nanopore which are induced by inserting a DNA nucleobase into the pore. We find a sizable change of the zero-bias conductance of two-terminal ZGNR + nanopore device after the nucleobase is placed into the most probable position (according to molecular dynamics trajectories) inside the nanopore of a small diameter \mbox{$D=1.2$ nm}. Although such effect decreases as the nanopore size is increased to \mbox{$D=1.7$ nm}, the contrast between currents in ZGNR + nanopore and ZGNR + nanopore + nucleobase systems can be enhanced by applying a small bias voltage $V_b \lesssim 0.1$ V. This is explained microscopically as being due to DNA nucleobase-induced modification of spatial profile of local current density around the edges of ZGNR. We repeat the same analysis using NEGF combined with self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding (NEGF+SCC-DFTB) or self-consistent extended H\"{u}ckel (NEGF+SC-EH) semi-empirical methodologies. The large discrepancy we find between the results obtained from NEGF+DFT vs. those obtained from NEGF+SCC-DFTB or NEGF+SC-EH approaches could be of great importance when selecting proper computational algorithms for {\em in silico} design of optimal nanoelectronic sensors for rapid DNA sequencing.
  • Using the charge-conserving Floquet-Green function approach to open quantum systems driven by external time periodic potential, we analyze how spin current pumped (in the absence of any dc bias voltage) by the precessing magnetization of a ferromagnetic (F) layer is injected {\em laterally} into the interface with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and converted into charge current flowing in the same direction. In the case of metallic interface with the Rashba SOC used in experiments [Nature Comm. {\bf 4}, 2944 (2013)], both spin $I^{S_\alpha}$ and charge $I$ current flow within it where $I/I^{S_\alpha} \simeq$ 2--8\% (depending on the precession cone angle), while for F/topological-insulator (F/TI) interface employed in related experiments (arXiv:1312.7091) the conversion efficiency is greatly enhanced $I/I^{S_\alpha} \simeq$ 40--60\% due to perfect spin-momentum locking on the surface of TI. The spin-to-charge conversion occurs also when spin current is pumped {\em vertically} through the F/TI interface with smaller efficiency $I/I^{S_\alpha} \sim 0.001\%$, but with charge current signal being sensitive to whether the Dirac fermions at the interface are massive or massless.
  • We study the transverse spin-Seebeck effect (SSE) on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) thin film, such as Bi$_2$Se$_3$, which is sandwiched between two normal metal leads. The temperature bias $\Delta T$ applied between the leads generates surface charge current which becomes spin-polarized due to strong spin-orbit coupling on the TI surface, with polarization vector acquiring a component $P_x \simeq 60%$ {\em parallel to the direction of transport}. When the third nonmagnetic voltage probe is attached to the portion of the TI surface across its width $L_y$, pure spin current will be injected into the probe where the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) converts it into a voltage signal \mbox{$|V_\mathrm{ISHE}|^\mathrm{max}/\Delta T \simeq 2.5$ $\mu$V/K} (assuming the SH angle of Pt voltage probe and $L_y=1$ mm). The existence of predicted nonequilibrium spin-polarization parallel to the direction of electronic transport and the corresponding electron-driven SSE crucially relies on orienting quintuple layers (QLs) of Bi$_2$Se$_3$ {\em orthogonal} to the TI surface and {\em tilted} by $45^\circ$ with respect to the direction of transport. Our analysis is based on the Landauer-B\"{u}ttiker-type formula for spin currents in the leads of a multi-terminal quantum-coherent junction, which is constructed using nonequilibrium Green function formalism within which we show how to take into account arbitrary orientation of QLs via the self-energy describing coupling between semi-infinite normal metal leads and TI.
  • We develop a numerically exact scheme for resumming certain classes of Feynman diagrams in the self-consistent perturbation expansion for the electron and magnon self-energies in the nonequilibrium Green function formalism applied to a coupled electron-magnon (\mbox{e-m}) system which is driven out of equilibrium by the applied finite bias voltage. Our scheme operates with the electronic and magnonic GFs and the corresponding self-energies viewed as matrices in the Keldysh space, rather than conventionally extracting their retarded and lesser components. This is employed to understand the effect of inelastic \mbox{e-m} scattering on charge and spin current vs. bias voltage $V_b$ in F/I/F magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), which are modeled on a one-dimensional (1D) tight-binding lattice for the electronic subsystem and 1D Heisenberg model for the magnonic subsystem. For this purpose, we evaluate Fock diagram for the electronic self-energy and the electron-hole polarization bubble diagram for the magnonic self-energy. The respective electronic and magnonic GF lines within these diagrams are the fully interacting ones, thereby requiring to solve the ensuing coupled system of nonlinear integral equations self-consistently. Despite using the 1D model and treating \mbox{e-m} interaction in many-body fashion only within a small active region consisting of few lattice sites around the F/I interface, our analysis captures essential features of the so-called zero-bias anomaly observed in both MgO- and AlO$_x$-based realistic 3D MTJs where the second derivative $d^2 I/dV_b^2$ (i.e., inelastic electron tunneling spectrum) of charge current exhibits sharp peaks of opposite sign on either side of the zero bias voltage.
  • Designing thermoelectric materials with high figure of merit $ZT=S^2 G T/\kappa$ requires fulfilling three often irreconcilable conditions, i.e., the high electrical conductance $G$, small thermal conductance $\kappa$ and high Seebeck coefficient $S$. Nanostructuring is one of the promising ways to achieve this goal as it can substantially suppress lattice contribution to $\kappa$. However, it may also unfavorably influence the electronic transport in an uncontrollable way. Here we theoretically demonstrate that this issue can be ideally solved by fabricating graphene nanoribbons with heavy adatoms and nanopores. These systems, acting as a two-dimensional topological insulator with robust helical edge states carrying electrical current, yield a highly optimized power factor $S^2G$ per helical conducting channel. Concurrently, their array of nanopores impedes the lattice thermal conduction through the bulk. Using quantum transport simulations coupled with first-principles electronic and phononic band structure calculations, the thermoelectric figure of merit is found to reach its maximum $ZT \simeq 3$ at $T \simeq 40$ K. This paves a way to design high-$ZT$ materials by exploiting the nontrivial topology of electronic states through nanostructuring.
  • We simulate quantum transport between a graphene nanoribbon (GNR) and a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) where electrons traverse vacuum gap between them. The GNR covers CNT over a nanoscale region while their relative rotation is 90 degrees, thereby forming a four-terminal crossbar where the bias voltage is applied between CNT and GNR terminals. The CNT and GNR are chosen as either semiconducting (s) or metallic (m) based on whether their two-terminal conductance exhibits a gap as a function of the Fermi energy or not, respectively. We find nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in all three investigated devices---mGNR-sCNT, sGNR-sCNT and mGNR-mCNT crossbars---which are asymmetric with respect to changing the bias voltage from positive to negative. Furthermore, the I-V characteristics of mGNR-sCNT crossbar exhibits negative differential resistance (NDR) with low onset voltage $V_\mathrm{NDR} \simeq 0.25$ V and peak-to-valley current ratio $\simeq 2.0$. The overlap region of the crossbars contains only $\simeq 460$ carbon and hydrogen atoms which paves the way for nanoelectronic devices ultrascaled well below the smallest horizontal length scale envisioned by the international technology roadmap for semiconductors. Our analysis is based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism combined with density functional theory (NEGF-DFT), where we also provide an overview of recent extensions of NEGF-DFT framework (originally developed for two-terminal devices) to multiterminal devices.
  • Experiments observing spin density and spin currents (responsible for, e.g., spin-transfer torque) in spintronic devices measure only the nonequilibrium contributions to these quantities, typically driven by injecting unpolarized charge current or by applying external time-dependent fields. On the other hand, theoretical approaches to calculate them operate with both the nonequilibrium (carried by electrons around the Fermi surface) and the equilibrium (carried by the Fermi sea electrons) contributions. Thus, an unambiguous procedure should remove the equilibrium contributions, thereby rendering the nonequilibrium ones which are measurable and satisfy the gauge-invariant condition according to which expectation values of physical quantities should not change when electric potential everywhere is shifted by a constant amount. Using the framework of nonequilibrium Green functions, we delineate such procedure which yields the proper gauge-invariant nonequilibrium density matrix in the linear-response and elastic transport regime for current-carrying steady state of an open quantum system connected to two macroscopic reservoirs. Its usage is illustrated by computing: (i) conventional spin-transfer torque (STT) in asymmetric F/I/F magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs); (ii) unconventional STT in asymmetric N/I/F semi-MTJs with the strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) at the I/F interface and injected current perpendicular to that plane; and (iii) current-driven spin density within a clean ferromagnetic Rashba spin-split two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) which generates SO torque in laterally patterned N/F/I heterostructures when such 2DEG is located at the N/F interface and injected charge current flows parallel to the plane.
  • Using the nonequilibrium Green function formalism combined with density functional theory, we study finite-bias quantum transport in Ni/Gr_n/Ni vertical heterostructures where $n$ graphene layers are sandwiched between two semi-infinite Ni(111) electrodes. We find that recently predicted "pessimistic" magnetoresistance of 100% for $n \ge 5$ junctions at zero bias voltage $V_b \rightarrow 0$, persists up to $V_b \simeq 0.4$ V, which makes such devices promising for spin-torque-based device applications. In addition, for parallel orientations of the Ni magnetizations, the $n=5$ junction exhibits a pronounced negative differential resistance as the bias voltage is increased from $V_b=0$ V to $V_b \simeq 0.5$ V. We confirm that both of these nonequilibrium effects hold for different types of bonding of Gr on the Ni(111) surface while maintaining Bernal stacking between individual Gr layers.
  • We predict an unconventional spin-transfer torque (STT) acting on the magnetization of a free ferromagnetic (F) layer within N/TI/F vertical heterostructures which originates from strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), as well as from charge current becoming spin-polarized in the direction of transport as it flows from the normal metal (N) across the bulk of the TI slab. Unlike conventional STT in symmetric F'/I/F magnetic tunnel junctions, where only the in-plane STT component is non-zero in the linear response, both the in-plane and perpendicular torque are sizable in N/TI/F junctions while not requiring fixed F' layer as spin-polarizer which is advantageous for spintronic applications. Using the nonequilibrium Born-Oppenheimer treatment of interaction between fast conduction electrons and slow magnetization, we derive a general Keldysh Green function-based STT formula which makes it possible to analyze torque in the presence of SOC either in the bulk or at the interface of the free F layer.
  • We analyze electronic and phononic quantum transport through zigzag or chiral graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) perforated with an array of nanopores. Since local charge current profiles in these GNRs are peaked around their edges, drilling nanopores in their interior does not affect such edge charge currents while drastically reducing heat current carried by phonons in sufficiently long wires. The combination of these two effects can yield highly efficient thermoelectric devices with maximum $ZT \simeq 11$ at liquid nitrogen temperature and $ZT \simeq 4$ at room temperature achieved in $\sim 1$ $\mu$m long zigzag GNRs with nanopores of variable diameter and spacing between them. Our analysis is based on the $\pi$-orbital tight-binding Hamiltonian with up to third nearest-neighbor hopping for electronic subsystem, the empirical fourth-nearest-neighbor model for phononic subsystem, and nonequilibrium Green function formalism to study quantum transport in both of these models.
  • Motivated by the recent experimental observation [D. A. Abanin et al., Science 323, 328 (2011)] of nonlocality in magnetotransport near the Dirac point in six-terminal graphene Hall bars, for a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields, we develop a nonequilibrium Green function (NEGF) theory of this phenomenon. In the phase-coherent regime and strong magnetic field, we find large spin Hall (SH) conductance in four-terminal bridges, where the SH current is pure only at the Dirac point (DP), as well as the nonlocal voltage at a remote location in six-terminal bars where the direct and inverse SH effect operate at the same time. The "momentum-relaxing" dephasing reduces their values at the DP by two orders of magnitude while concurrently washing out any features away from the DP. Our theory is based on the Meir-Wingreen formula with dephasing introduced via phenomenological many-body self-energies, which is then linearized for multiterminal geometries to extract currents and voltages.
  • We develop a time-dependent nonequilibrium Green function (NEGF) approach to the problem of spin pumping by precessing magnetization in one of the ferromagnetic layers within F/I/F magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) or F/I/N semi-MTJs in the presence of intrinsic Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) at the F/I interface or the extrinsic SOC in the bulk of F layers of finite thickness (F-ferromagnet; N-normal metal; I-insulating barrier). To express the time-averaged pumped charge current, or the corresponding dc voltage signal in open circuits that was measured in recent experiments on semi-MTJs [T. Moriyama et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 067602 (2008)], we construct a novel solution for the double-time-Fourier-transformed NEGFs. The two energy arguments of NEGFs in this representation are connected by the Floquet theorem describing multiphoton emission and absorption processes. Within this fully quantum-mechanical treatment of the conduction electrons, we find that: (i) only in the presence of the interfacial Rashba SOC the non-zero dc pumping voltage in F/I/N semi-MTJ can emerge at the adiabatic level (i.e., proportional to microwave frequency); (ii) a unique signature of this charge pumping phenomenon, which disappears if Rashba SOC is not located with the precessing F layer, is dc pumping voltage that changes sign as the function of the precession cone angle; (iii) unlike standard spin pumping in the absence of SOCs, where one emitted or absorbed microwave photon is sufficient to match the exact solution in the frame rotating with the magnetization, the presence of the Rashba SOC requires to take into account up to ten photons in order to reach the asymptotic value of pumped charge current; (iv) disorder within F/I/F MTJs can enhance the dc pumping voltage in the quasiballistic transport regime; ...
  • We overview nonequilibrium Green function combined with density functional theory (NEGF-DFT) modeling of independent electron and phonon transport in nanojunctions with applications focused on a new class of thermoelectric devices where a single molecule is attached to two metallic zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) via highly transparent contacts. Such contacts make possible injection of evanescent wavefunctions from ZGNRs, so that their overlap within the molecular region generates a peak in the electronic transmission. Additionally, the spatial symmetry properties of the transverse propagating states in the ZGNR electrodes suppress hole-like contributions to the thermopower. Thus optimized thermopower, together with diminished phonon conductance through a ZGNR/molecule/ZGNR inhomogeneous structure, yields the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT~0.5 at room temperature and 0.5<ZT<2.5 below liquid nitrogen temperature. The reliance on evanescent mode transport and symmetry of propagating states in the electrodes makes the electronic-transport-determined power factor in this class of devices largely insensitive to the type of sufficiently short conjugated organic molecule, which we demonstrate by showing that both 18-annulene and C10 molecule sandwiched by the two ZGNR electrodes yield similar thermopower. Thus, one can search for molecules that will further reduce the phonon thermal conductance (in the denominator of ZT) while keeping the electronic power factor (in the nominator of ZT) optimized. We also show how often employed Brenner empirical interatomic potential for hydrocarbon systems fails to describe phonon transport in our single-molecule nanojunctions when contrasted with first-principles results obtained via NEGF-DFT methodology.