• ROXs 12 (2MASS J16262803-2526477) is a young star hosting a directly imaged companion near the deuterium-burning limit. We present a suite of spectroscopic, imaging, and time-series observations to characterize the physical and environmental properties of this system. Moderate-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of ROXs 12 B from Gemini-North/NIFS and Keck/OSIRIS reveals signatures of low surface gravity including weak alkali absorption lines and a triangular $H$-band pseudo-continuum shape. No signs of Pa$\beta$ emission are evident. As a population, however, we find that about half (46 $\pm$ 14\%) of young ($\lesssim$15 Myr) companions with masses $\lesssim$20 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$ possess actively accreting subdisks detected via Pa$\beta$ line emission, which represents a lower limit on the prevalence of circumplanetary disks in general as some are expected to be in a quiescent phase of accretion. The bolometric luminosity of the companion and age of the host star (6$^{+4}_{-2}$ Myr) imply a mass of 17.5 $\pm$ 1.5 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$ for ROXs 12 B based on hot-start evolutionary models. We identify a wide (5100 AU) tertiary companion to this system, 2MASS J16262774-2527247, which is heavily accreting and exhibits stochastic variability in its $K2$ light curve. By combining $v$sin$i_*$ measurements with rotation periods from $K2$, we constrain the line-of-sight inclinations of ROXs 12 A and 2MASS J16262774-2527247 and find that they are misaligned by 60$^{+7}_{-11}$$^{\circ}$. In addition, the orbital axis of ROXs 12 B is likely misaligned from the spin axis of its host star ROXs 12 A, suggesting that ROXs 12 B formed akin to fragmenting binary stars or in an equatorial disk that was torqued by the wide stellar tertiary.
  • We report the discovery of an extremely red planetary-mass companion to 2MASS J22362452+4751425, a $\approx$0.6 $M_{\odot}$ late-K dwarf likely belonging to the $\sim$120 Myr AB Doradus moving group. 2M2236+4751 b was identified in multi-epoch NIRC2 adaptive optics imaging at Keck Observatory at a separation of 3.7$"$, or 230 $\pm$ 20 AU in projection at the kinematic distance of 63 $\pm$ 5 pc to its host star. Assuming membership in the AB Dor group, as suggested from its kinematics, the inferred mass of 2M2236+4751 b is 11-14 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$. Follow-up Keck/OSIRIS $K$-band spectroscopy of the companion reveals strong CO absorption similar to other faint red L dwarfs and lacks signs of methane absorption despite having an effective temperature of $\approx$900-1200 K. With a ($J$-$K$)$_\mathrm{MKO}$ color of 2.69 $\pm$ 0.12 mag, the near-infrared slope of 2M2236+4751 b is redder than all of the HR 8799 planets and instead resembles the $\approx$23 Myr isolated planetary-mass object PSO J318.5-22, implying that similarly thick photospheric clouds can persist in the atmospheres of giant planets at ages beyond 100 Myr. In near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams, 2M2236+4751 b is located at the tip of the red L dwarf sequence and appears to define the "elbow" of the AB Dor substellar isochrone separating low-gravity L dwarfs from the cooler young T dwarf track. 2M2236+4751 b is the reddest substellar companion to a star and will be a valuable benchmark to study the shared atmospheric properties of young low-mass brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets.
  • We present Keck/NIRC2 and OSIRIS near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of 2M0441+2301 AabBab, a young (1--3 Myr) hierarchical quadruple system comprising a low-mass star, two brown dwarfs, and a planetary-mass companion in Taurus. All four components show spectroscopic signs of low surface gravity, and both 2M0441+2301 Aa and Ab possess Pa$\beta$ emission indicating they each harbor accretion subdisks. Astrometry spanning 2008--2014 reveals orbital motion in both the Aab (0.23" separation) and Bab (0.095" separation) pairs, although the implied orbital periods of $>$300 years means dynamical masses will not be possible in the near future. The faintest component (2M0441+2301 Bb) has an angular $H$-band shape, strong molecular absorption (VO, CO, H$_2$O, and FeH), and shallow alkali lines, confirming its young age, late spectral type (L1 $\pm$ 1), and low temperature ($\approx$1800~K). With individual masses of 200$^{+100}_{-50}$ Mjup, 35 $\pm$ 5 Mjup, 19 $\pm$ 3 Mjup, and 9.8 $\pm$ 1.8 Mjup, 2M0441+2301 AabBab is the lowest-mass quadruple system known. Its hierarchical orbital architecture and mass ratios imply that it formed from the collapse and fragmentation of a molecular cloud core, demonstrating that planetary-mass companions can originate from a stellar-like pathway analogous to higher-mass quadruple star systems as first speculated by Todorov et al. More generally, cloud fragmentation may be an important formation pathway for the massive exoplanets that are now regularly being imaged on wide orbits.
  • We report the discovery by the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign of two low-mass companions to the young A0V star HD 1160 at projected separations of 81 +/- 5 AU (HD 1160 B) and 533 +/- 25 AU (HD 1160 C). VLT images of the system taken over a decade for the purpose of using HD 1160 A as a photometric calibrator confirm that both companions are physically associated. By comparing the system to members of young moving groups and open clusters with well-established ages, we estimate an age of 50 (+50,-40) Myr for HD 1160 ABC. While the UVW motion of the system does not match any known moving group, the small magnitude of the space velocity is consistent with youth. Near-IR spectroscopy shows HD 1160 C to be an M3.5 +/- 0.5 star with an estimated mass of 0.22 (+0.03,-0.04) M_Sun, while NIR photometry of HD 1160 B suggests a brown dwarf with a mass of 33 (+12,-9) M_Jup. The very small mass ratio (0.014) between the A and B components of the system is rare for A star binaries, and would represent a planetary-mass companion were HD 1160 A to be slightly less massive than the Sun.
  • We present a systematic study of the physical properties of late-M dwarfs based on high-quality dynamical mass measurements and near-infrared (NIR) spectra. We use astrometry from Keck NGS and LGS AO imaging to determine orbits for late-M binaries. We find that LP 349-25 (M7.5+M8) is a pair of young brown dwarfs (Mtot = 0.120 Msun) for which Lyon and Tucson evolutionary models jointly predict an age of 140+/-30 Myr. This is consistent with the age of the Pleiades, but at least LP 349-25A defies the empirical Pleiades lithium depletion boundary, implying that the system is in fact older and that evolutionary models underpredict the component luminosities. We find that LHS 1901AB (M6.5+M6.5) is a pair of very low-mass stars (Mtot = 0.194 Msun) with model-derived ages consistent with limits from its lack of activity (> 6 Gyr). Our improved orbit for Gl 569Bab (M8.5+M9) results in a higher mass for this binary (Mtot = 0.140 Msun) compared to previous work (0.125 Msun). We use these masses along with our published results for 2MASS J2206-2047AB (M8+M8) to test four sets of ultracool model atmospheres currently in use. Fitting these models to our NIR integrated-light spectra provides temperature estimates warmer by ~250 K than those derived independently from Dusty evolutionary models given the measured masses and luminosities. We propose that model atmospheres are more likely to be the source of this discrepancy, as it would be difficult to explain a uniform temperature offset over such a wide range of masses, ages, and activity levels in the context of evolutionary models. Our results contrast those of Konopacky et al. as we find an opposite and smaller mass discrepancy from what they report when we adopt their model-testing approach since our Teff estimates from fitting spectra are ~650 K higher than from their fitting of broadband photometry alone.