• Gl 758 B is a late-T dwarf orbiting a metal-rich Sun-like star at a projected separation of $\rho$ $\approx$ 1.6" (25 AU). We present four epochs of astrometry of this system with NIRC2 at Keck Observatory spanning 2010 to 2017 together with 630 radial velocities (RVs) of the host star acquired over the past two decades from McDonald Observatory, Keck Observatory, and the Automated Planet Finder at Lick Observatory. The RVs reveal that Gl 758 is accelerating with an evolving rate that varies between 2-5 m s$^{-1}$ yr$^{-1}$, consistent with the expected influence of the imaged companion Gl 758 B. A joint fit of the RVs and astrometry yields a dynamical mass of 42$^{+19}_{-7}$ M$_\mathrm{Jup}$ for the companion with a robust lower limit of 30.5 M$_\mathrm{Jup}$ at the 4-$\sigma$ level. Gl 758 B is on an eccentric orbit ($e$ = 0.26-0.67 at 95% confidence) with a semimajor axis of $a$ = $21.1_{-1.3}^{+2.7}$ AU and an orbital period of $P$ = $96_{-9}^{+21}$ yr, which takes it within $\approx$9 AU from its host star at periastron passage. Substellar evolutionary models generally underpredict the mass of Gl 758 B for nominal ages of 1-6 Gyr that have previously been adopted for the host star. This discrepancy can be reconciled if the system is older---which is consistent with activity indicators and recent isochrone fitting of the host star---or alternatively if the models are systematically overluminous by $\approx$0.1-0.2 dex. Gl 758 B is currently the lowest-mass directly imaged companion inducing a measured acceleration on its host star. In the future, bridging RVs and high-contrast imaging with the next generation of extremely large telescopes and space-based facilities will open the door to the first dynamical mass measurements of imaged exoplanets.
  • The occurrence rate of young giant planets from direct imaging surveys is a fundamental tracer of the efficiency with which planets form and migrate at wide orbital distances. These measurements have progressively converged to a value of about 1% for the most massive planets ($\approx$5-13 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$) averaged over all stellar masses at separations spanning a few tens to a few hundreds of AU. The subtler statistical properties of this population are beginning to emerge with ever-increasing sample sizes: there is tentative evidence that planets on wide orbits are more frequent around stars that possess debris disks; brown dwarf companions exist at comparable (or perhaps slightly higher) rates as their counterparts in the planetary-mass regime; and the substellar companion mass function appears to be smooth and may extend down to the opacity limit for fragmentation. Within a few years, the conclusion of second-generation direct imaging surveys will enable more definitive interpretations with the ultimate goal of identifying the dominant origin of this population and uncovering its relationship to planets at smaller separations.
  • We describe a joint high contrast imaging survey for planets at Keck and VLT of the last large sample of debris disks identified by the Spitzer Space Telescope. No new substellar companions were discovered in our survey of 30 Spitzer-selected targets. We combine our observations with data from four published surveys to place constraints on the frequency of planets around 130 debris disk single stars, the largest sample to date. For a control sample, we assembled contrast curves from several published surveys targeting 277 stars which do not show infrared excesses. We assumed a double power law distribution in mass and semi-major axis of the form f(m,a) = $Cm^{\alpha}a^{\beta}$, where we adopted power law values and logarithmically flat values for the mass and semi-major axis of planets. We find that the frequency of giant planets with masses 5-20 $M_{\rm Jup}$ and separations 10-1000 AU around stars with debris disks is 6.27% (68% confidence interval 3.68 - 9.76%), compared to 0.73% (68% confidence interval 0.20 - 1.80%) for the control sample of stars without disks. These distributions differ at the 88% confidence level, tentatively suggesting distinctness of these samples.
  • We image 104 newly identified low-mass (mostly M-dwarf) pre-main sequence members of nearby young moving groups with Magellan Adaptive Optics (MagAO) and identify 27 binaries with instantaneous projected separation as small as 40 mas. 15 were previously unknown. The total number of multiple systems in this sample including spectroscopic and visual binaries from the literature is 36, giving a raw multiplicity rate of at least $35^{+5}_{-4}\%$ for this population. In the separation range of roughly 1 - 300 AU in which infrared AO imaging is most sensitive, the raw multiplicity rate is at least $24^{+5}_{-4}\%$ for binaries resolved by the MagAO infrared camera (Clio). The M-star sub-sample of 87 stars yields a raw multiplicity of at least $30^{+5}_{-4}\%$ over all separations, $21^{+5}_{-4}\%$ for secondary companions resolved by Clio from 1 to 300 AU ($23^{+5}_{-4}\%$ for all known binaries in this separation range). A combined analysis with binaries discovered by the Search for Associations Containing Young stars shows that multiplicity fraction as a function of mass and age over the range of 0.2 to 1.2 $M_\odot$ and 10 - 200 Myr appears to be linearly flat in both parameters and across YMGs. This suggests that multiplicity rates are largely set by 100 Myr without appreciable evolution thereafter. After bias corrections are applied, the multiplicity fraction of low-mass YMG members ($< 0.6 M_\odot$) is in excess of the field.
  • Our Keck/NIRC2 imaging survey searches for stellar companions around 144 systems with radial velocity (RV) detected giant planets to determine whether stellar binaries influence the planets' orbital parameters. This survey, the largest of its kind to date, finds eight confirmed binary systems and three confirmed triple systems. These include three new multi-stellar systems (HD 30856, HD 86081, and HD 207832) and three multi-stellar systems with newly confirmed common proper motion (HD 43691, HD 116029, and HD 164509). We combine these systems with seven RV planet-hosting multi-stellar systems from the literature in order to test for differences in the properties of planets with semimajor axes ranging between 0.1-5 au in single vs multi-stellar systems. We find no evidence that the presence or absence of stellar companions alters the distribution of planet properties in these systems. Although the observed stellar companions might influence the orbits of more distant planetary companions in these systems, our RV observations currently provide only weak constraints on the masses and orbital properties of planets beyond 5 au. In order to aid future efforts to characterize long period RV companions in these systems, we publish our contrast curves for all 144 targets. Using four years of astrometry for six hierarchical triple star systems hosting giant planets, we fit the orbits of the stellar companions in order to characterize the orbital architecture in these systems. We find that the orbital plane of the secondary and tertiary companions are inconsistent with an edge-on orbit in four out of six cases.
  • We present the discovery of eight young M7-L2 dwarfs in the Taurus star-forming region and the Scorpius-Centaurus OB Association, serendipitously found during a wide-field search for L/T transition dwarfs using Pan-STARRS1 (optical) and WISE (mid-infrared) photometry. We identify PSO J060.3200+25.9644 (near-infrared spectral type L1) and PSO J077.1033+24.3809 (L2) as new members of Taurus based on their VL-G gravity classifications, the consistency of their photometry and proper motions with previously known Taurus objects, and the low probability of contamination by field objects. PSO J077.1033+24.3809 is the coolest substellar member of Taurus found to date. Both Taurus objects are among the lowest mass free-floating objects ever discovered, with estimated masses $\approx$6 M$_{\rm Jup}$, and provide further evidence that isolated planetary-mass objects can form as part of normal star-formation processes. PSO J060.3200+25.9644 (a.k.a. DANCe J040116.80+255752.2) was previously identified as a likely member of the Pleiades (age $\approx125$ Myr) based on photometry and astrometry, but its VL-G gravity classification and near-infrared photometry imply a much younger age and thus point to Taurus membership. We have also discovered six M7-L1 dwarfs in outlying regions of Scorpius-Centaurus with photometry, proper motions, and low-gravity spectral signatures consistent with membership. These objects have estimated masses $\approx$15-36 M$_{\rm Jup}$. The M7 dwarf, PSO J237.1470-23.1489, shows excess mid-infrared flux implying the presence of a circumstellar disk. Finally, we present catalogs of Pan-STARRS1 proper motions for low-mass members of Taurus and Upper Scorpius with median precisions of $\approx$3 mas yr$^{-1}$, including 67 objects with no previous proper motion and 359 measurements that improve on literature values.
  • We present the discovery of a 360 AU separation T3 companion to the tight (3.1 AU) M4.5+M6.5 binary 2MASS J02132062+3648506. This companion was identified using Pan-STARRS1 data and, despite its relative proximity to the Sun (22.2$_{-4.0}^{+6.4}$ pc; Pan-STARRS1 parallax) and brightness ($J$=15.3), appears to have been missed by previous studies due to its position near a diffraction spike in 2MASS. The close M~dwarf binary has active X-ray and H$\alpha$ emission and shows evidence for UV flares. The binary's weak {\it GALEX} UV emission and strong Na I 8200\AA Na absorption leads us to an age range of $\sim$1-10Gyr. Applying this age range to evolutionary models implies the wide companion has a mass of 0.063$\pm$0.009\,$M_{\odot}$. 2MASS J0213+3648 C provides a relatively old benchmark close to the L/T transition and acts as a key, older comparison to the much younger early-T companions HN~Peg~B and GU~Psc~b.
  • We have conducted an angular differential imaging survey with NIRC2 at Keck in search of close-in substellar companions to a sample of seven systems with confirmed planetary-mass companions (PMCs) on wide orbits (>50 AU). These wide-separation PMCs pose significant challenges to all three possible formation mechanisms: core accretion plus scattering, disk instability, and turbulent fragmentation. We explore the possibility that these companions formed closer in and were scattered out to their present-day locations by searching for other massive bodies at smaller separations. The typical sensitivity for this survey is \Delta K ~ 12.5 at 1". We identify eight candidate companions, whose masses would reach as low as one Jupiter mass if gravitationally bound. From our multi-epoch astrometry we determine that seven of these are conclusively background objects, while the eighth near DH Tau is ambiguous and requires additional monitoring. We rule out the presence of >7 M$_{\rm Jup}$ bodies in these systems down to 15 - 50 AU that could be responsible for scattering. This result combined with the totality of evidence suggests that dynamical scattering is unlikely to have produced this population of PMCs. We detect orbital motion from the companions ROXs 42B b and ROXs 12 b, and from this determine 95% upper limits on the companions' eccentricities of 0.58 and 0.83 respectively. Finally, we find that the 95% upper limit on the occurrence rate of additional planets with masses between 5 - 15 M$_{\rm Jup}$ outside of 40 AU in systems with PMCs is 54%.
  • High-contrast adaptive optics imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order adaptive optics systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young ($\approx$5--300~Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1--3.0~\Msun, the overall occurrence rate of 5--13~\Mjup \ companions at orbital distances of 30--300~AU is 0.6$^{+0.7}_{-0.5}$\% assuming hot-start evolutionary models. The most massive giant planets regularly accessible to direct imaging are about as rare as hot Jupiters are around Sun-like stars. Dividing this sample into individual stellar mass bins does not reveal any statistically-significant trend in planet frequency with host mass: giant planets are found around 2.8$^{+3.7}_{-2.3}$\% of BA stars, $<$4.1\% of FGK stars, and $<$3.9\% of M dwarfs. Looking forward, extreme adaptive optics systems and the next generation of ground- and space-based telescopes with smaller inner working angles and deeper detection limits will increase the pace of discovery to ultimately map the demographics, composition, evolution, and origin of planets spanning a broad range of masses and ages.
  • Studying the properties of young planetary systems can shed light on how the dynamics and structure of planets evolve during their most formative years. Recent K2 observations of nearby young clusters (10-800 Myr) have enabled the discovery of such planetary systems. Here we report the discovery of a Neptune-sized planet transiting an M4.5 dwarf (K2-25) in the Hyades cluster (650-800 Myr). The lightcurve shows a strong periodic signal at 1.88 days, which we attribute to spot coverage and rotation. We confirm the planet host is a member of the Hyades by measuring the radial velocity of the system with the high-resolution near-infrared spectrograph IGRINS. This enables us to calculate a distance based on EPIC 210490365's kinematics and membership to the Hyades, which in turn provides a stellar radius and mass to 5-10%, better than what is currently possible for most Kepler M dwarfs (12-20%). We use the derived stellar density as a prior on fitting the K2 transit photometry, which provides weak constraints on eccentricity. Utilizing a combination of adaptive optics imaging and high-resolution spectra we rule out the possibility that the signal is due to a bound or background eclipsing binary, confirming the transits' planetary origin. EPIC 210490365b has a radius ($3.43^{+0.95}_{-0.31}$R$_{E}$) much larger than older Kepler planets with similar orbital periods (3.484 days) and host-star masses (0.29$M_{\odot}$). This suggests that close-in planets lose some of their atmospheres past the first few hundred Myr. Additional transiting planets around the Hyades, Pleiades, and Praesepe clusters from K2 will help confirm if this planet is atypical or representative of other close-in planets of similar age.
  • The census of exoplanets is incomplete for orbital distances larger than 1 AU. Here, we present 41 long-period planet candidates in 38 systems identified by Planet Hunters based on Kepler archival data (Q0-Q17). Among them, 17 exhibit only one transit, 14 have two visible transits and 10 have more than three visible transits. For planet candidates with only one visible transit, we estimate their orbital periods based on transit duration and host star properties. The majority of the planet candidates in this work (75%) have orbital periods that correspond to distances of 1-3 AU from their host stars. We conduct follow-up imaging and spectroscopic observations to validate and characterize planet host stars. In total, we obtain adaptive optics images for 33 stars to search for possible blending sources. Six stars have stellar companions within 4". We obtain high-resolution spectra for 6 stars to determine their physical properties. Stellar properties for other stars are obtained from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and the Kepler Stellar Catalog by Huber et al. (2014). We validate 7 planet candidates that have planet confidence over 0.997 (3-{\sigma} level). These validated planets include 3 single-transit planets (KIC-3558849b, KIC-5951458b, and KIC-8540376c), 3 planets with double transits (KIC-8540376b, KIC-9663113b, and KIC-10525077b), and 1 planet with 4 transits (KIC-5437945b). This work provides assessment regarding the existence of planets at wide separations and the associated false positive rate for transiting observation (17%-33%). More than half of the long-period planets with at least three transits in this paper exhibit transit timing variations up to 41 hours, which suggest additional components that dynamically interact with the transiting planet candidates. The nature of these components can be determined by follow-up radial velocity and transit observations.
  • We combine new high resolution imaging and spectroscopy from Keck/NIRC2, Discovery Channel Telescope/DSSI, and Keck/HIRES with published astrometry and radial velocities to measure individual masses and orbital elements of the GJ 3305 AB system, a young (~20 Myr) M+M binary (unresolved spectral type M0) member of the beta Pictoris moving group comoving with the imaged exoplanet host 51 Eri. We measure a total system mass of 1.11 \pm 0.04 M_sun, a period of 29.03 \pm 0.50$ yr, a semimajor axis of 9.78 \pm 0.14 AU, and an eccentricity of 0.19 \pm 0.02. The primary component has a dynamical mass of 0.67 \pm 0.05 M_sun and the secondary has a mass of 0.44 \pm 0.05 M_sun. The recently updated BHAC15 models are consistent with the masses of both stars to within 1.5 sigma. Given the observed masses the models predict an age of the GJ 3305 AB system of 37 \pm 9 Myr. Based on the the observed system architecture and our dynamical mass measurement, it is unlikely that the orbit of 51 Eri b has been significantly altered by the Kozai-Lidov mechanism.
  • The extended Kepler mission, K2, is now providing photometry of new fields every three months in a search for transiting planets. In a recent study, Foreman-Mackey and collaborators presented a list of 36 planet candidates orbiting 31 stars in K2 Campaign 1. In this contribution, we present stellar and planetary properties for all systems. We combine ground-based seeing-limited survey data and adaptive optics imaging with an automated transit analysis scheme to validate 21 candidates as planets, 17 for the first time, and identify 6 candidates as likely false positives. Of particular interest is K2-18 (EPIC 201912552), a bright (K=8.9) M2.8 dwarf hosting a 2.23 \pm 0.25 R_Earth planet with T_eq = 272 \pm 15 K and an orbital period of 33 days. We also present two new open-source software packages which enable this analysis. The first, isochrones, is a flexible tool for fitting theoretical stellar models to observational data to determine stellar properties using a nested sampling scheme to capture the multimodal nature of the posterior distributions of the physical parameters of stars that may plausibly be evolved. The second is vespa, a new general-purpose procedure to calculate false positive probabilities and statistically validate transiting exoplanets.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of GSC 6214-210 A and B, a solar-mass member of the 5-10 Myr Upper Scorpius association with a 15 $\pm$ 2 Mjup companion orbiting at $\approx$330 AU (2.2"). Previous photometry and spectroscopy spanning 0.3-5 $\mu$m revealed optical and thermal excess as well as strong H$\alpha$ and Pa~$\beta$ emission originating from a circum-substellar accretion disk around GSC 6214-210 B, making it the lowest mass companion with unambiguous evidence of a subdisk. Despite ALMA's unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution, neither component was detected in our 880 $\mu$m (341 GHz) continuum observations down to a 3-$\sigma$ limit of 0.22 mJy/beam. The corresponding constraints on the dust mass and total mass are <0.15 Mearth and <0.05 Mjup, respectively, or <0.003% and <0.3% of the mass of GSC 6214-210 B itself assuming a 100:1 gas-to-dust ratio and characteristic dust temperature of 10-20 K. If the host star possesses a putative circum-stellar disk then at most it is a meager 0.0015% of the primary mass, implying that giant planet formation has certainly ceased in this system. Considering these limits and its current accretion rate, GSC 6214-210 B appears to be at the end stages of assembly and is not expected to gain any appreciable mass over the next few Myr.
  • We present optical and near-infrared adaptive optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopy of 13 ultracool (>M6) companions to late-type stars (K7-M4.5), most of which have recently been identified as candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs; 8-120 Myr) in the literature. The inferred masses of the companions (~10-100 Mjup) are highly sensitive to the ages of the primary stars so we critically examine the kinematic and spectroscopic properties of each system to distinguish bona fide YMG members from old field interlopers. 2MASS J02155892-0929121 C is a new M7 substellar companion (40-60 Mjup) with clear spectroscopic signs of low gravity and hence youth. The primary, possibly a member of the ~40 Myr Tuc-Hor moving group, is visually resolved into three components, making it a young low-mass quadruple system in a compact (<100 AU) configuration. In addition, Li 1 $\lambda$6708 absorption in the intermediate-gravity M7.5 companion 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B provides unambiguous evidence that it is young (<200 Myr) and resides below the hydrogen burning limit. Three new close-separation (<1") companions (2MASS J06475229-2523304 B, PYC J11519+0731 B, and GJ 4378 Ab) orbit stars previously reported as candidate YMG members, but instead are likely old (>1 Gyr) tidally-locked spectroscopic binaries without convincing kinematic associations with any known moving group. The high rate of false positives in the form of old active stars with YMG-like kinematics underscores the importance of radial velocity and parallax measurements to validate candidate young stars identified via proper motion and activity selection alone. Finally, we spectroscopically confirm the cool temperature and substellar nature of HD 23514 B, a recently discovered M8 benchmark brown dwarf orbiting the dustiest-known member of the Pleiades. [Abridged]
  • We report the first planet discovery from the two-wheeled Kepler (K2) mission: HIP 116454 b. The host star HIP 116454 is a bright (V = 10.1, K = 8.0) K1-dwarf with high proper motion, and a parallax-based distance of 55.2 +/- 5.4 pc. Based on high-resolution optical spectroscopy, we find that the host star is metal-poor with [Fe/H] = -.16 +/- .18, and has a radius R = 0.716 +/- .0024 R_sun and mass M = .775 +/- .027 Msun. The star was observed by the Kepler spacecraft during its Two-Wheeled Concept Engineering Test in February 2014. During the 9 days of observations, K2 observed a single transit event. Using a new K2 photometric analysis technique we are able to correct small telescope drifts and recover the observed transit at high confidence, corresponding to a planetary radius of Rp = 2.53 +/- 0.18 Rearth. Radial velocity observations with the HARPS-N spectrograph reveal a 11.82 +/- 1.33 Mearth planet in a 9.1 day orbit, consistent with the transit depth, duration, and ephemeris. Follow-up photometric measurements from the MOST satellite confirm the transit observed in the K2 photometry and provide a refined ephemeris, making HIP 116454 b amenable for future follow-up observations of this latest addition to the growing population of transiting super-Earths around nearby, bright stars.
  • We present ALMA observations of the FW Tau system, a close binary pair of M5 stars with a wide-orbit (300 AU projected separation) substellar companion. The companion is extremely faint and red in the optical and near-infrared, but boasts a weak far-infrared excess and optical/near-infrared emission lines indicative of a primordial accretion disk of gas and dust. The component-resolved 1.3 mm continuum emission is found to be associated only with the companion, with a flux (1.78 +/- 0.03 mJy) that indicates a dust mass of 1-2 M_Earth. While this mass reservoir is insufficient to form a giant planet, it is more than sufficient to produce an analog of the Kepler-42 exoplanetary system or the Galilean satellites. The mass and geometry of the disk-bearing FW Tau companion remains unclear. Near-infrared spectroscopy shows deep water bands that indicate a spectral type later than M5, but substantial veiling prevents a more accurate determination of the effective temperature (and hence mass). Both a disk-bearing "planetary-mass" companion seen in direct light or a brown dwarf tertiary viewed in light scattered by an edge-on disk or envelope remain possibilities.
  • We present results from a high-contrast adaptive optics imaging search for giant planets and brown dwarfs (>1 MJup) around 122 newly identified nearby (<40 pc) young M dwarfs. Half of our targets are younger than 135 Myr and 90% are younger than the Hyades (620 Myr). Our H- and K-band coronagraphic observations with Keck/NIRC2 and Subaru/HiCIAO achieve typical contrasts of 12-14 mag and 9-13 mag at 1", respectively, which corresponds to limiting planet masses of 0.5-10 MJup at 5-33 AU for 85% of our sample. We discovered four young brown dwarf companions: 1RXS J235133.3+312720 B (32 $\pm$ 6 MJup; L0$^{+2}_{-1}$; 120 $\pm$ 20 AU), GJ 3629 B (64$^{+30}_{-23}$ MJup; M7.5 $\pm$ 0.5; 6.5 $\pm$ 0.5 AU), 1RXS J034231.8+121622 B (35 $\pm$ 8 MJup; L0 $\pm$ 1; 19.8 $\pm$ 0.9 AU), and 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B (43 $\pm$ 9 MJup; M8.0 $\pm$ 0.5; 190 $\pm$ 20 AU). Over 150 candidate planets were identified; we obtained follow-up imaging for 56% of these but all are consistent with background stars. Our null detection of planets enables strong statistical constraints on the occurrence rate of long-period giant planets around single M dwarfs. We infer an upper limit (at the 95% confidence level) of 10.3% and 16.0% for 1-13 MJup planets between 10-100 AU for hot-start and cold-start (Fortney) evolutionary models, respectively. Fewer than 6.0% (9.9%) of M dwarfs harbor massive gas giants in the 5-13 MJup range like those orbiting HR 8799 and $\beta$ Pictoris between 10-100 AU for a hot-start (cold-start) formation scenario. Although the first directly imaged planets were found around massive stars, there is currently no statistical evidence for a trend of giant planet frequency with stellar host mass at large separations as predicted by the disk instability model of giant planet formation.
  • We present the discovery of 61 wide (>5 arcsecond) separation, low-mass (stellar and substellar) companions to stars in the solar neighborhood identified from Pan-STARRS\,1 (PS1) data and the spectral classification of 27 previously known companions. Our companions represent a selective subsample of promising candidates and span a range in spectral type of K7-L9 with the addition of one DA white dwarf. These were identified primarily from a dedicated common proper motion search around nearby stars, along with a few as serendipitous discoveries from our Pan-STARRS1 brown dwarf search. Our discoveries include 24 new L dwarf companions and one known L dwarf not previously identified as a companion. The primary stars around which we searched for companions come from a list of bright stars with well-measured parallaxes and large proper motions from the Hipparcos catalog (8583 stars, mostly A-K~dwarfs) and fainter stars from other proper motion catalogues (79170 stars, mostly M~dwarfs). We examine the likelihood that our companions are chance alignments between unrelated stars and conclude that this is unlikely for the majority of the objects that we have followed-up spectroscopically. We also examine the entire population of ultracool (>M7) dwarf companions and conclude that while some are loosely bound, most are unlikely to be disrupted over the course of $\sim$10 Gyr. Our search increases the number of ultracool M dwarf companions wider than 300 AU by 88% and increases the number of L dwarf companions in the same separation range by 96%. Finally, we resolve our new L dwarf companion to HIP 6407 into a tight (0.13 arcsecond, 7.4 AU) L1+T3 binary, making the system a hierarchical triple. Our search for these key benchmarks against which brown dwarf and exoplanet atmosphere models are tested has yielded the largest number of discoveries to date.
  • The Palomar Ultraviolet Laser for the Study of Exoplanets (PULSE) will dramatically expand the science reach of PALM-3000, the facility high-contrast extreme adaptive optics system on the 5-meter Hale Telescope. By using an ultraviolet laser to measure the dominant high spatial and temporal order turbulence near the telescope aperture, one can increase the limiting natural guide star magnitude for exquisite correction from mV < 10 to mV < 16. Providing the highest near-infrared Strehl ratios from any large telescope laser adaptive optics system, PULSE uniquely enables spectroscopy of low-mass and more distant young exoplanet systems, essential to formulating a complete picture of exoplanet populations.
  • We present moderate-resolution ($R$$\sim$4000-5000) near-infrared integral field spectroscopy of the young (1-5 Myr) 6-14 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$ companions ROXs 42B b and FW Tau b obtained with Keck/OSIRIS and Gemini-North/NIFS. The spectrum of ROXs 42B b exhibits clear signs of low surface gravity common to young L dwarfs, confirming its extreme youth, cool temperature, and low mass. Overall, it closely resembles the free-floating 4-7 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$ L-type Taurus member 2MASS J04373705+2331080. The companion to FW Tau AB is more enigmatic. Our optical and near-infrared spectra show strong evidence of outflow activity and disk accretion in the form of line emission from [S II], [O I], H$\alpha$, Ca II, [Fe II], Pa$\beta$, and H$_2$. The molecular hydrogen emission is spatially resolved as a single lobe that stretches $\approx$0.1" (15 AU). Although the extended emission is not kinematically resolved in our data, its morphology resembles shock-excited H$_2$ jets primarily seen in young Class 0 and Class I sources. The near-infrared continuum of FW Tau b is mostly flat and lacks the deep absorption features expected for a cool, late-type object. This may be a result of accretion-induced veiling, especially in light of its strong and sustained H$\alpha$ emission ($EW$(H$\alpha$)$\gtrsim$290 \AA). Alternatively, FW Tau b may be a slightly warmer (M5-M8) accreting low-mass star or brown dwarf (0.03-0.15 $M_{\odot}$) with an edge-on disk. Regardless, its young evolutionary stage is in stark contrast to its Class III host FW Tau AB, indicating a more rapid disk clearing timescale for the host binary system than for its wide companion. Finally, we present near-infrared spectra of the young ($\sim$2-10 Myr) low-mass (12-15 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$) companions GSC 6214-210 B and SR 12 C and find they best resemble low gravity M9.5 and M9 substellar templates.
  • We report the discovery of three planetary-mass companions (M = 6--20 $M_{Jup}$) in wide orbits ($\rho \sim$ 150--300 AU) around the young stars FW Tau (Taurus-Auriga), ROXs 12 (Ophiuchus), and ROXs 42B (Ophiuchus). All three wide planetary-mass companions ("PMCs") were reported as candidate companions in previous binary survey programs, but then were neglected for $>$10 years. We therefore obtained followup observations which demonstrate that each candidate is comoving with its host star. Based on the absolute $M_{K'}$ magnitudes, we infer masses (from hot-start evolutionary models) and projected separations of 10 $\pm$ 4 $M_{Jup}$ and 330 $\pm$ 30 AU for FW Tau b, 16 $\pm$ 4 $M_{Jup}$ and 210 $\pm$ 20 AU for ROXs 12 b, and 10 $\pm$ 4 $M_{Jup}$ and 140 $\pm$ 10 AU for ROXs 42B b. We also present similar observations for ten other candidates which show that they are unassociated field stars, as well as multicolor JHK'L' near-infrared photometry for our new PMCs and for five previously-identified substellar or planetary-mass companions. The NIR photometry for our sample of eight known and new companions generally parallels the properties of free-floating low-mass brown dwarfs in these star-forming regions. However, 5 of the 7 objects with M $<$ 30 $M_{Jup}$ are redder in K'-L' than the distribution of young free-floating counterparts of similar J-K'. We speculate that this distinction could indicate a structural difference in circum-planetary disks, perhaps tied to higher disk mass since at least two of the objects in our sample are known to be accreting more vigorously than typical free-floating counterparts.
  • We report the discovery of an L-type companion to the young M3.5V star 2MASS J01225093-2439505 at a projected separation of 1.45" (~52 AU) as part of our adaptive optics imaging search for extrasolar giant planets around young low-mass stars. 2MASS 0122-2439 B has very red near-infrared colors similar to the HR 8799 planets and the reddest known young/dusty L dwarfs in the field. Moderate-resolution (R~3800) 1.5-2.4 $\mu$m spectroscopy reveals a near-infrared spectral type of L4-L6 and an angular H-band shape, confirming its cool temperature and young age. The kinematics of 2MASS 0122-2439 AB are marginally consistent with members of the ~120 Myr AB Dor young moving group based on the photometric distance to the primary (36 +/- 4 pc) and our radial velocity measurement of 2MASS 0122-2439 A from Keck/HIRES. We adopt the AB Dor group age for the system, but the high energy emission, lack of Li I $\lambda$6707 absorption, and spectral shape of 2MASS 0122-2439 B suggest a range of ~10-120 Myr is possible. The age and luminosity of 2MASS 0122-2439 B fall in a strip where "hot-start" evolutionary model mass tracks overlap as a result of deuterium burning. The implied mass of 2MASS 0122-2439 B is ~12-13 Mjup or ~22-27 Mjup if it is an AB Dor member, or possibly as low as 11 Mjup if the wider age range is adopted. Evolutionary models predict an effective temperature for 2MASS 0122-2439 B that corresponds to spectral types near the L/T transition (~1300-1500 K) for field objects. However, we find a mid-L near-infrared spectral type, indicating that 2MASS 0122-2439 B represents another case of photospheric dust being retained to cooler temperatures at low surface gravities, as seen in the spectra of young (8-30 Myr) planetary companions. [Abridged]
  • Using Keck laser guide star adaptive optics imaging, we have found that the T9 dwarf WISE J1217+1626 and T8 dwarf WISE J1711+3500 are exceptional binaries, with unusually wide separations (~0.8 arcsec, 8-15 AU), large near-IR flux ratios (~2-3 mags), and small mass ratios (~0.5) compared to previously known field ultracool binaries. Keck/NIRSPEC H-band spectra give a spectral type of Y0 for WISE J1217+1626B, and photometric estimates suggest T9.5 for WISE J1711+3500B. The WISE J1217+1626AB system is very similar to the T9+Y0 binary CFBDSIR J1458+1013AB; these two systems are the coldest known substellar multiples, having secondary components of ~400 K and being planetary-mass binaries if their ages are <~1 Gyr. Both WISE J1217+1626B and CFBDSIR J1458+1013B have strikingly blue Y-J colors compared to previously known T dwarfs, including their T9 primaries. Combining all available data, we find that Y-J color drops precipitously between the very latest T dwarfs and the Y dwarfs. The fact that this is seen in (coeval, mono-metallicity) binaries demonstrates that the color drop arises from a change in temperature, not surface gravity or metallicity variations among the field population. Thus, the T/Y transition established by near-IR spectra coincides with a significant change in the ~1 micron fluxes of ultracool photospheres. One explanation is the depletion of potassium, whose broad absorption wings dominate the far-red optical spectra of T dwarfs. This large color change suggests that far-red data may be valuable for classifying objects of <~500 K.
  • We report the discovery of a wide (approximately 400 AU projected separation), common proper motion companion to the nearby M dwarf LHS 2803 (PSO J207.0300-13.7422). This object was discovered during our census of the local T dwarf population using Pan-STARRS1 and 2MASS data. Using IRTF/SpeX near-infrared spectroscopy, we classify the secondary to be spectral type T5.5. University of Hawai`i 2.2m/SNIFS optical spectroscopy indicates the primary has a spectral type of M4.5, with approximately solar metallicity and no measurable H_alpha emission. We use this lack of activity to set a lower age limit for the system of 3.5 Gyr. Using a comparison with chance alignments of brown dwarfs and nearby stars, we conclude that the two objects are unlikely to be a chance association. The primary's photometric distance of 21 pc and its proper motion implies thin disk kinematics. Based on these kinematics and its metallicity, we set an upper age limit for the system of 10 Gyr. Evolutionary model calculations suggest the secondary has a mass of 72^+4_-7 M_Jup, temperature of 1120+-80 K, and log g=5.4+-0.1 dex. Model atmosphere fitting to the near-IR spectrum gives similar physical parameters of 1100 K and log g=5.0.