• How impulsive magnetic energy release leads to solar eruptions and how those eruptions are energized and evolve are vital unsolved problems in Heliophysics. The standard model for solar eruptions summarizes our current understanding of these events. Magnetic energy in the corona is released through drastic restructuring of the magnetic field via reconnection. Electrons and ions are then accelerated by poorly understood processes. Theories include contracting loops, merging magnetic islands, stochastic acceleration, and turbulence at shocks, among others. Although this basic model is well established, the fundamental physics is poorly understood. HXR observations using grazing-incidence focusing optics can now probe all of the key regions of the standard model. These include two above-the-looptop (ALT) sources which bookend the reconnection region and are likely the sites of particle acceleration and direct heating. The science achievable by a direct HXR imaging instrument can be summarized by the following science questions and objectives which are some of the most outstanding issues in solar physics (1) How are particles accelerated at the Sun? (1a) Where are electrons accelerated and on what time scales? (1b) What fraction of electrons is accelerated out of the ambient medium? (2) How does magnetic energy release on the Sun lead to flares and eruptions? A Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) instrument, which can be built now using proven technology and at modest cost, would enable revolutionary advancements in our understanding of impulsive magnetic energy release and particle acceleration, a process which is known to occur at the Sun but also throughout the Universe.
  • Even in the absence of resolved flares, the corona is heated to several million degrees. However, despite its importance for the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the solar atmosphere, the origin of this heating remains poorly understood. Several observational and theoretical considerations suggest that the heating is driven by small, impulsive energy bursts which could be Parker-style "nanoflares" (Parker 1988) that arise via reconnection within the tangled and twisted coronal magnetic field. The classical "smoking gun" (Klimchuk 2009; Cargill et al. 2013) for impulsive heating is the direct detection of widespread hot plasma (T > 6 MK) with a low emission measure. In recent years there has been great progress in the development of Transition Edge Sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeters that make them more ideal for studying the Sun. When combined with grazing-incidence focusing optics, they provide direct spectroscopic imaging over a broad energy band (0.5 to 10 keV) combined with extremely impressive energy resolution in small pixels, as low as 0.7 eV (FWHM) at 1.5 keV (Lee 2015), and 1.56 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV (Smith 2012), two orders of magnitude better than the current best traditional solid state photon-counting spectrometers. Decisive observations of the hot plasma associated with nanoflare models of coronal heating can be provided by new solar microcalorimeters. These measurements will cover the most important part of the coronal spectrum for searching for the nanoflare-related hot plasma and will characterize how much nanoflares can heat the corona both in active regions and the quiet Sun. Finally, microcalorimeters will enable to study all of this as a function of time and space in each pixel simultaneously a capability never before available.
  • The detailed knowledge of plasma heating and acceleration region properties presents a major observational challenge in solar flare physics. Using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), the high temperature differential emission measure, DEM(T), and the energy-dependent spatial structure of solar flare coronal sources are studied quantitatively. The altitude of the coronal X-ray source is observed to increase with energy by ~+0.2 arcsec/keV between 10 and 25 keV. Although an isothermal model can fit the thermal X-ray spectrum observed by RHESSI, such a model cannot account for the changes in altitude, and multi-thermal coronal sources are required where the temperature increases with altitude. For the first time, we show how RHESSI imaging information can be used to constrain the DEM(T) of a flaring plasma. We develop a thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission model with inhomogeneous temperature and density distributions to simultaneously reproduce: i) DEM(T), ii) altitude as a function of energy, and iii) vertical extent of the flaring coronal source versus energy. We find that the temperature-altitude gradient in the region is ~+0.08 keV/arcsec (~1.3 MK/Mm). Similar altitude-energy trends in other flares suggest that the majority of coronal X-ray sources are multi-thermal and have strong vertical temperature and density gradients with a broad DEM(T).
  • We argue that the hour-long neutron transient detected by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) Neutron Spectrometer beginning at 15:45 UT on 2011 June 4 is due to secondary neutrons from energetic protons interacting in the spacecraft. The protons were probably accelerated by a shock that passed the spacecraft about thirty minutes earlier. We reach this conclusion after a study of data from the MESSENGER neutron spectrometer, gamma-ray spectrometer, X-ray Spectrometer, and Energetic Particle Spectrometer, and from the particle spectrometers on STEREO A. Our conclusion differs markedly from that given by Lawrence et al. [2014] who claimed that there is "strong evidence" that the neutrons were produced by the interaction of ions in the solar atmosphere. We identify significant faults with the authors' arguments that led them to that conclusion.