• We model and compute the average response of truncated Burgers-Hopf dynamics to finite perturbations away from the Gibbs equipartition energy spectrum using a dynamical optimization framework recently conceptualized in a series of papers. Non-equilibrium averages are there approximated in terms of geodesic paths in probability space that best-fit the Liouvillean dynamics over a family of quasi-equilibrium trial densities. By recasting the geodesic principle as an optimal control problem, we solve numerically for the non-equilibrium responses using an augmented Lagrangian, non-linear conjugate gradient descent method. For moderate perturbations, we find an excellent agreement between the optimal predictions and the direct numerical simulations of the truncated Burgers-Hopf dynamics. In this near-equilibrium regime, we argue that the optimal response theory provides an approximate yet predictive counterpart to fluctuation-dissipation identities.
  • A model reduction technique based on an optimization principle is employed to coarse-grain inviscid, incompressible fluid dynamics in two dimensions. In this reduction the spectrally-truncated vorticity equation defines the microdynamics, while the macroscopic state space consists of quasi-equilibrium trial probability densities on the microscopic phase space, which are parameterized by the means and variances of the low modes of the vorticity. A macroscopic path therefore represents a coarse-grained approximation to the evolution of a nonequilibrium ensemble of microscopic solutions. Closure in terms of the vector of resolved variables, namely, the means and variances of the low modes, is achieved by minimizing over all feasible paths the time integral of their mean-squared residual with respect to the Liouville equation. The equations governing the optimal path are deduced from Hamilton-Jacobi theory. The coarse-grained dynamics derived by this optimization technique contains a scale-dependent eddy viscosity, modified nonlinear interactions between the low mode means, and a nonlinear coupling between the mean and variance of each low mode. The predictive skill of this optimal closure is validated quantitatively by comparing it against direct numerical simulations. These tests show that good agreement is achieved without adjusting any closure parameters.
  • A general method for deriving closed reduced models of Hamiltonian dynamical systems is developed using techniques from optimization and statistical estimation. As in standard projection operator methods, a set of resolved variables is selected to capture the slow, macroscopic behavior of the system, and the family of quasi-equilibrium probability densities on phase space corresponding to these resolved variables is employed as a statistical model. The macroscopic dynamics of the mean resolved variables is determined by optimizing over paths of these probability densities. Specifically, a cost function is introduced that quantifies the lack-of-fit of such paths to the underlying microscopic dynamics; it is an ensemble-averaged, squared-norm of the residual that results from submitting a path of trial densities to the Liouville equation. The evolution of the macrostate is estimated by minimizing the time integral of the cost function. The value function for this optimization satisfies the associated Hamilton-Jacobi equation, and it determines the optimal relation between the statistical parameters and the irreversible fluxes of the resolved variables, thereby closing the reduced dynamics. The resulting equations for the macroscopic variables have the generic form of governing equations for nonequilibrium thermodynamics, and they furnish a rational extension of the classical equations of linear irreversible thermodynamics beyond the near-equilibrium regime. In particular, the value function is a thermodynamic potential that extends the classical dissipation function and supplies the nonlinear relation between thermodynamics forces and fluxes.
  • A new method of deriving reduced models of Hamiltonian dynamical systems is developed using techniques from optimization and statistical estimation. Given a set of resolved variables that define a model reduction, the quasi-equilibrium ensembles associated with the resolved variables are employed as a family of trial probability densities on phase space. The residual that results from submitting these trial densities to the Liouville equation is quantified by an ensemble-averaged cost function related to the information loss rate of the reduction. From an initial nonequilibrium state, the statistical state of the system at any later time is estimated by minimizing the time integral of the cost function over paths of trial densities. Statistical closure of the underresolved dynamics is obtained at the level of the value function, which equals the optimal cost of reduction with respect to the resolved variables, and the evolution of the estimated statistical state is deduced from the Hamilton-Jacobi equation satisfied by the value function. In the near-equilibrium regime, or under a local quadratic approximation in the far-from-equilibrium regime, this best-fit closure is governed by a differential equation for the estimated state vector coupled to a Riccati differential equation for the Hessian matrix of the value function. Since memory effects are not explicitly included in the trial densities, a single adjustable parameter is introduced into the cost function to capture a time-scale ratio between resolved and unresolved motions. Apart from this parameter, the closed equations for the resolved variables are completely determined by the underlying deterministic dynamics.
  • We illustrate a novel characterization of nonequivalent statistical mechanical ensembles using the mean-field Blume-Emery-Griffiths (BEG) model as a test model. The novel characterization takes effect at the level of the microcanonical and canonical equilibrium distributions of states. For this reason it may be viewed as a statistical characterization of nonequivalent ensembles which extends and complements the common thermodynamic characterization of nonequivalent ensembles based on nonconcave anomalies of the microcanonical entropy. By computing numerically both the microcanonical and canonical sets of equilibrium distributions of states of the BEG model, we show that for values of the mean energy where the microcanonical entropy is nonconcave, the microcanonical distributions of states are nowhere realized in the canonical ensemble. Moreover, we show that for values of the mean energy where the microcanonical entropy is strictly concave, the equilibrium microcanonical distributions of states can be put in one-to-one correspondence with equivalent canonical equilibrium distributions of states. Our numerical computations illustrate general results relating thermodynamic and statistical equivalence and nonequivalence of ensembles proved by Ellis, Haven, and Turkington [J. Stat. Phys. 101, 999 (2000)].
  • A statistical model of self-organization in a generic class of one-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) equations on a bounded interval is developed. The main prediction of this model is that the statistically preferred state for such equations consists of a deterministic coherent structure coupled with fine-scale, random fluctuations, or radiation. The model is derived from equilibrium statistical mechanics by using a mean-field approximation of the conserved Hamiltonian and particle number for finite-dimensional spectral truncations of the NLS dynamics. The continuum limits of these approximated statistical equilibrium ensembles on finite-dimensional phase spaces are analyzed, holding the energy and particle number at fixed, finite values. The analysis shows that the coherent structure minimizes total energy for a given value of particle number and hence is a solution to the NLS ground state equation, and that the remaining energy resides in Gaussian fluctuations equipartitioned over wavenumbers. Some results of direct numerical integration of the NLS equation are included to validate empirically these properties of the most probable states for the statistical model. Moreover, a theoretical justification of the mean-field approximation is given, in which the approximate ensembles are shown to concentrate on the associated microcanonical ensemble in the continuum limit.