• The Herschel Space Observatory was the fourth cornerstone mission in the European Space Agency (ESA) science programme with excellent broad band imaging capabilities in the sub-mm and far-infrared part of the spectrum. Although the spacecraft finished its observations in 2013, it left a large legacy dataset that is far from having been fully scrutinised and still has a large potential for new scientific discoveries. This is specifically true for the photometric observations of the PACS and SPIRE instruments. Some source catalogues have already been produced by individual observing programs, but there are many observations that risk to remain unexplored. To maximise the science return of the SPIRE and PACS data sets, we are in the process of building the Herschel Point Source Catalogue (HPSC) from all primary and parallel mode observations. Our homogeneous source extraction enables a systematic and unbiased comparison of sensitivity across the different Herschel fields that single programs will generally not be able to provide. The catalogue will be made available online through archives like the Herschel Science Archive (HSA), the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA), and the Strasbourg Astronomical Data Center (CDS).
  • The cores of clusters at 0 $\lesssim$ z $\lesssim$ 1 are dominated by quiescent early-type galaxies, whereas the field is dominated by star-forming late-type ones. Galaxy properties, notably the star formation (SF) ability, are altered as they fall into overdense regions. The critical issues to understand this evolution are how the truncation of SF is connected to the morphological transformation and the responsible physical mechanism. The GaLAxy Cluster Evolution Survey (GLACE) is conducting a study on the variation of galaxy properties (SF, AGN, morphology) as a function of environment in a representative sample of clusters. A deep survey of emission line galaxies (ELG) is being performed, mapping a set of optical lines ([OII], [OIII], H$\beta$ and H$\alpha$/[NII]) in several clusters at z $\sim$ 0.40, 0.63 and 0.86. Using the Tunable Filters (TF) of OSIRIS/GTC, GLACE applies the technique of TF tomography: for each line, a set of images at different wavelengths are taken through the TF, to cover a rest frame velocity range of several thousands km/s. The first GLACE results target the H$\alpha$/[NII] lines in the cluster ZwCl 0024.0+1652 at z = 0.395 covering $\sim$ 2 $\times$ r$_{vir}$. We discuss the techniques devised to process the TF tomography observations to generate the catalogue of H$\alpha$ emitters of 174 unique cluster sources down to a SFR below 1 M$_{\odot}$/yr. The AGN population is discriminated using different diagnostics and found to be $\sim$ 37% of the ELG population. The median SFR is 1.4 M$_{\odot}$/yr. We have studied the spatial distribution of ELG, confirming the existence of two components in the redshift space. Finally, we have exploited the outstanding spectral resolution of the TF to estimate the cluster mass from ELG dynamics, finding M$_{200}$ = 4.1 $\times$ 10$^{14}$ M$_{\odot} h^{-1}$, in agreement with previous weak-lensing estimates.
  • We present the activities carried out to calibrate and characterise the performance of the elements of attitude control and measurement on board the Herschel spacecraft. The main calibration parameters and the evolution of the indicators of the pointing performance are described, from the initial values derived from the observations carried out in the performance verification phase to those attained in the last year and half of mission, an absolute pointing error around or even below 1 arcsec, a spatial relative pointing error of some 1 arcsec and a pointing stability below 0.2 arsec. The actions carried out at the ground segment to improve the spacecraft pointing measurements are outlined. On-going and future developments towards a final refinement of the Herschel astrometry are also summarised. A brief description of the different components of the attitude control and measurement system (both in the space and in the ground segments) is also given for reference. We stress the importance of the cooperation between the different actors (scientists, flight dynamics and systems engineers, attitude control and measurement hardware designers, star-tracker manufacturers, etc.) to attain the final level of performance.
  • We report the likely identification of a substantial population of massive M~10^11M_Sun galaxies at z~4 with suppressed star formation rates (SFRs), selected on rest-frame optical to near-IR colors from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey. The observed spectral energy distributions show pronounced breaks, sampled by a set of near-IR medium-bandwidth filters, resulting in tightly constrained photometric redshifts. Fitting stellar population models suggests large Balmer/4000AA breaks, relatively old stellar populations, large stellar masses and low SFRs, with a median specific SFR of 2.9+/-1.8 x 10^-11/yr. Ultradeep Herschel/PACS 100micron, 160micron and Spitzer/MIPS 24micron data reveal no dust-obscured SFR activity for 15/19 (79%) galaxies. Two far-IR detected galaxies are obscured QSOs. Stacking the far-IR undetected galaxies yields no detection, consistent with the SED fit, indicating independently that the average specific SFR is at least 10x smaller than of typical star-forming galaxies at z~4. Assuming all far-IR undetected galaxies are indeed quiescent, the volume density is 1.8+/-0.7 x 10^-5Mpc^-3 to a limit of log10M/M_Sun>10.6, which is 10x and 80x lower than at z = 2 and z = 0.1. They comprise a remarkably high fraction (~35%) of z~4 massive galaxies, suggesting that suppression of star formation was efficient even at very high redshift. Given the average stellar age of 0.8Gyr and stellar mass of 0.8x10^11M_Sun, the galaxies likely started forming stars before z =5, with SFRs well in excess of 100M_Sun/yr, far exceeding that of similarly abundant UV-bright galaxies at z>4. This suggests that most of the star-formation in the progenitors of quiescent z~4 galaxies was obscured by dust.
  • The galaxy cluster CLG0218.3-0510 at z=1.62 is one of the most distant galaxy clusters known, with a rich muti-wavelength data set that confirms a mature galaxy population already in place. Using very deep, wide area (20x20 Mpc) imaging by Spitzer/MIPS at 24um, in conjunction with Herschel 5-band imaging from 100-500um, we investigate the dust-obscured, star-formation properties in the cluster and its associated large scale environment. Our galaxy sample of 693 galaxies at z=1.62 detected at 24um (10 spectroscopic and 683 photo-z) includes both cluster galaxies (i.e. within r <1 Mpc projected clustercentric radius) and field galaxies, defined as the region beyond a radius of 3 Mpc. The star-formation rates (SFRs) derived from the measured infrared luminosity range from 18 to 2500 Ms/yr, with a median of 55 Ms/yr, over the entire radial range (10 Mpc). The cluster brightest FIR galaxy, taken as the centre of the galaxy system, is vigorously forming stars at a rate of 256$\pm$70 Ms/yr, and the total cluster SFR enclosed in a circle of 1 Mpc is 1161$\pm$96 Ms/yr. We estimate a dust extinction of about 3 magnitudes by comparing the SFRs derived from [OII] luminosity with the ones computed from the 24um fluxes. We find that the in-falling region (1-3 Mpc) is special: there is a significant decrement (3.5x) of passive relative to star-forming galaxies in this region, and the total SFR of the galaxies located in this region is lower (130 Ms/yr/Mpc2) than anywhere in the cluster or field, regardless of their stellar mass. In a complementary approach we compute the local galaxy density, Sigma5, and find no trend between SFR and Sigma5. However, we measure an excess of star-forming galaxies in the cluster relative to the field by a factor 1.7, that lends support to a reversal of the SF-density relation in CLG0218.
  • This paper provides an overview of the PACS photometer flux calibration concept, in particular for the principal observation mode, the scan map. The absolute flux calibration is tied to the photospheric models of five fiducial stellar standards (alpha Boo, alpha Cet, alpha Tau, beta And, gamma Dra). The data processing steps to arrive at a consistent and homogeneous calibration are outlined. In the current state the relative photometric accuracy is around 2% in all bands. Starting from the present calibration status, the characterization and correction for instrumental effects affecting the relative calibration accuracy is described and an outlook for the final achievable calibration numbers is given. After including all the correction for the instrumental effects, the relative photometric calibration accuracy (repeatability) will be as good as 0.5% in the blue and green band and 2% in the red band. This excellent calibration starts to reveal possible inconsistencies between the models of the K-type and the M-type stellar calibrators. The absolute calibration accuracy is therefore mainly limited by the 5% uncertainty of the celestial standard models in all three bands. The PACS bolometer response was extremely stable over the entire Herschel mission and a single, time-independent response calibration file is sufficient for the processing and calibration of the science observations. The dedicated measurements of the internal calibration sources were needed only to characterize secondary effects. No aging effects of the bolometer or the filters have been found. Also, we found no signs of filter leaks. The PACS photometric system is very well characterized with a constant energy spectrum nu*Fnu = lambda*Flambda = const as a reference. Colour corrections for a wide range of sources SEDs are determined and tabulated.
  • We present a flux calibration scheme for the PACS chopped point-source photometry observing mode based on the photometry of five stellar standard sources. This mode was used for science observations only early in the mission. Later, it was only used for pointing and flux calibration measurements. Its calibration turns this type of observation into fully validated data products in the Herschel Science Archive. Systematic differences in calibration with regard to the principal photometer observation mode, the scan map, are derived and amount to 5-6%. An empirical method to calibrate out an apparent response drift during the first 300 Operational Days is presented. The relative photometric calibration accuracy (repeatability) is as good as 1% in the blue and green band and up to 5% in the red band. Like for the scan map mode, inconsistencies among the stellar calibration models become visible and amount to 2% for the five standard stars used. The absolute calibration accuracy is therefore mainly limited by the model uncertainty, which is 5% for all three bands.
  • In the local Universe, galaxy properties show a strong dependence on environment. In cluster cores, early type galaxies dominate, whereas star-forming galaxies are more and more common in the outskirts. At higher redshifts and in somewhat less dense environments (e.g. galaxy groups), the situation is less clear. One open issue is that of whether and how the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies in groups depends on the distance from the centre of mass. To shed light on this topic, we have built a sample of X-ray selected galaxy groups at 0<z<1.6 in various blank fields (ECDFS, COSMOS, GOODS). We use a sample of spectroscopically confirmed group members with stellar mass M >10^10.3 M_sun in order to have a high spectroscopic completeness. As we use only spectroscopic redshifts, our results are not affected by uncertainties due to projection effects. We use several SFR indicators to link the star formation (SF) activity to the galaxy environment. Taking advantage of the extremely deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel PACS observations, we have an accurate, broad-band measure of the SFR for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies. We use multi-wavelength SED fitting techniques to estimate the stellar masses of all objects and the SFR of the MIPS and PACS undetected galaxies. We analyse the dependence of the SF activity, stellar mass and specific SFR on the group-centric distance, up to z~1.6, for the first time. We do not find any correlation between the mean SFR and group-centric distance at any redshift. We do not observe any strong mass segregation either, in agreement with predictions from simulations. Our results suggest that either groups have a much smaller spread in accretion times with respect to the clusters and that the relaxation time is longer than the group crossing time.
  • We have compiled a large sample of 151 high redshift (z=0.5-4) galaxies selected at 24 microns (S24>100 uJy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-infrared spectrum into contributions from star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei. In addition, we have a wealth of photometric data from Spitzer IRAC/MIPS and Herschel PACS/SPIRE. We explore how effective different infrared color combinations are at separating our mid-IR spectroscopically determined active galactic nuclei from our star forming galaxies. We look in depth at existing IRAC color diagnostics, and we explore new color-color diagnostics combining mid-IR, far-IR, and near-IR photometry, since these combinations provide the most detail about the shape of a source's IR spectrum. An added benefit of using a color that combines far-IR and mid-IR photometry is that it is indicative of the power source driving the IR luminosity. For our data set, the optimal color selections are S250/S24 vs. S8.0/S3.6 and S100/S24 vs. S8.0/S3.6; both diagnostics have ~10% contamination rate in the regions occupied primarily by star forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei, respectively. Based on the low contamination rate, these two new IR color-color diagnostics are ideal for estimating both the mid-IR power source of a galaxy when spectroscopy is unavailable and the dominant power source contributing to the IR luminosity. In the absence of far-IR data, we present color diagnostics using the WISE mid-IR bands which can efficiently select out high z (z~2) star forming galaxies.
  • We explore the effects of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation activity on the infrared (0.3-1000 microns) spectral energy distributions of luminous infrared galaxies from z = 0.5 to 4.0. We have compiled a large sample of 151 galaxies selected at 24 microns (S24 > 100 uJy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-IR spectrum into contributions from star formation and AGN activity. A significant portion (~25%) of our sample is dominated by an AGN in the mid-IR. Based on the mid-IR classification, we divide our full sample into four sub-samples: z~1 star-forming (SF) sources; z~2 SF sources; AGN with clear 9.7 micron silicate absorption; and AGN with featureless mid-IR spectra. From our large spectroscopic sample and wealth of multi-wavelength data, including deep Herschel imaging at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns, we use 95 galaxies with complete spectral coverage to create a composite spectral energy distribution (SED) for each sub-sample. We then fit a two-temperature component modified blackbody to the SEDs. We find that the IR SEDs have similar cold dust temperatures, regardless of the mid-IR power source, but display a marked difference in the warmer dust temperatures. We calculate the average effective temperature of the dust in each sub-sample and find a significant (~20 K) difference between the SF and AGN systems. We compare our composite SEDs to local templates and find that local templates do not accurately reproduce the mid-IR features and dust temperatures of our high redshift systems. High redshift IR luminous galaxies contain significantly more cool dust than their local counterparts. We find that a full suite of photometry spanning the IR peak is necessary to accurately account for the dominant dust temperature components in high redshift IR luminous galaxies.
  • Dusty galaxies at z ~ 2 span a wide range of relative brightness between rest-frame mid-infrared (8um) and ultraviolet wavelengths. We attempt to determine the physical mechanism responsible for this diversity. Dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), which have rest-frame mid-IR to UV flux density ratios > 1000, might be abnormally bright in the mid-IR, perhaps due to prominent AGN and/or PAH emission, or abnormally faint in the UV. We use far-infrared data from the GOODS-Herschel survey to show that most DOGs with 10^12 L_Sun < L_IR < 10^13 L_Sun are not abnormally bright in the mid-IR when compared to other dusty galaxies with similar IR (8--1000um) luminosities. We observe a relation between the median IR to UV luminosity ratios and the median UV continuum power-law indices for these galaxies, and we find that only 24% have specific star formation rates which indicate the dominance of compact star-forming regions. This circumstantial evidence supports the idea that the UV- and IR-emitting regions in these galaxies are spatially coincident, which implies a connection between the abnormal UV faintness of DOGs and dust obscuration. We conclude that the range in rest-frame mid-IR to UV flux density ratios spanned by dusty galaxies at z ~ 2 is due to differing amounts of UV obscuration. Of galaxies with these IR luminosities, DOGs are the most obscured. We attribute differences in UV obscuration to either: 1) differences in the degree of alignment between the spatial distributions of dust and massive stars, or 2) differences in the total dust content.
  • Using deep 100-160 micron observations in GOODS-S from the GOODS-H survey, combined with HST/WFC3 NIR imaging from CANDELS, we present the first morphological analysis of a complete, FIR selected sample of 52 ULIRGs at z~2. We also make use of a comparison sample of galaxies without Herschel detections but with the same z and magnitude distribution. Our visual classifications of these two samples indicate that the fraction of objects with disk and spheroid morphologies is roughly the same but that there are significantly more mergers, interactions, and irregular galaxies among the ULIRGs. The combination of disk and irregular/interacting morphologies suggests that early stage interactions and minor mergers could play an important role in ULIRGs at z~2. We compare these fractions with those of a z~1 sample across a wide luminosity range and find that the fraction of disks decreases systematically with L_IR while the fraction of mergers and interactions increases, as has been observed locally. At comparable luminosities, the fraction of ULIRGs with various morphological classifications is similar at z~2 and z~1. We investigate the position of the ULIRGs, along with 70 LIRGs, on the specific star formation rate versus redshift plane, and find 52 systems to be starbursts (lie more than a factor of 3 above the main sequence relation). The morphologies of starbursts are dominated by interacting and merging systems (50%). If irregular disks are included as potential minor mergers, then we find that up to 73% of starbursts are involved in a merger or interaction at some level. Although the final coalescence of a major merger may not be required for the high luminosities of ULIRGs at z~2 as is the case locally, the large fraction of interactions at all stages and potential minor mergers suggest that the high star formation rates of ULIRGs are still largely externally triggered at z~2.
  • We have processed 2774 high-galactic observations from the XMM archive (as of May 2010) and extracted a serendipitous catalogue of some 850 clusters of galaxies based on purely X-ray criteria, following the methodology developed for the XMM-LSS survey. Restricting the sample to the highest signal-to-noise objects (347 clusters), we perform a cosmological analysis using the X-ray information only. The analysis consists in the modelling of the observed colour-magnitude (CR-HR) diagram constructed from cluster instrumental count-rates measured in the [0.5-2], [1-2] and [0.5-1] keV bands. A MCMC procedure simultaneously fits the cosmological parameters, the evolution of the cluster scaling laws and the selection effects. Our results are consistent with the sigma_8 and Omega_m values obtained by WMAP-5 and point toward a negative evolution of the cluster scaling relations with respect to the self-similar expectation. We are further able to constrain the cluster fractional radius xc0=r_c/r500c, to xc0=0.24 +/- 0.04. This study stresses again the critical role of selection effects in deriving cluster scaling relations, even in the local universe. Finally, we show that CR-HR method applied to the eRosita all-sky survey - provided that cluster photometric redshifts are available - will enable the determination of the equation of state of the dark energy at the level of the DETF stage IV predictions; simultaneously, the evolution of the cluster scaling-relations will be unambiguously determined. The XMM CLuster Archive Super Survey (XCLASS) serendipitous cluster catalogue is available online at: http://xmm-lss.in2p3.fr:8080/l4sdb/.
  • We compare multi-wavelength SFR indicators out to z~3 in GOODS-South. Our analysis uniquely combines U-to-8um photometry from FIREWORKS, MIPS 24um and PACS 70, 100, and 160um photometry from the PEP survey, and Ha spectroscopy from the SINS survey. We describe a set of conversions that lead to a continuity across SFR indicators. A luminosity-independent conversion from 24um to total infrared luminosity yields estimates of LIR that are in the median consistent with the LIR derived from PACS photometry, albeit with significant scatter. Dust correction methods perform well at low to intermediate levels of star formation. They fail to recover the total amount of star formation in systems with large SFR_IR/SFR_UV ratios, typically occuring at the highest SFRs (SFR_UV+IR \gtrsim 100 Msun/yr) and redshifts (z \gtrsim 2.5) probed. Finally, we confirm that Ha-based SFRs at 1.5<z<2.6 are consistent with SFR_SED and SFR_UV+IR provided extra attenuation towards HII regions is taken into account (Av,neb = Av,continuum / 0.44). With the cross-calibrated SFR indicators in hand, we perform a consistency check on the star formation histories inferred from SED modeling. We compare the observed SFR-M relations and mass functions at a range of redshifts to equivalents that are computed by evolving lower redshift galaxies backwards in time. We find evidence for underestimated stellar ages when no stringent constraints on formation epoch are applied. We demonstrate how resolved SED modeling, or alternatively deep UV data, may help to overcome this bias. The age bias is most severe for galaxies with young stellar populations, and reduces towards older systems. Finally, our analysis suggests that SFHs typically vary on timescales that are long (at least several 100 Myr) compared to the galaxies' dynamical time.
  • We have attempted to analyse all the available data taken by XMM-Newton as it slews between targets. This slew survey, the resultant source catalogue and the analysis procedures used are described in an accompanying paper. In this letter we present the initial science results from the survey. To date, detailed source-searching has been performed in three X-ray bands (soft, hard and total) in the EPIC-pn 0.2-12 keV band over ~6300 sq.degrees (~15% of the sky), and of order 4000 X-ray sources have been detected (~55% of which have IDs). A great variety of sources are seen, including AGN, galaxies, clusters and groups, active stars, SNRs, low- and high-mass XRBs and white dwarfs. In particular, as this survey constitutes the deepest ever hard-band 2-12 keV all-sky survey, a large number of hard sources are detected. Furthermore, the great sensitivity and low-background of the EPIC-pn camera are especially suited to emission from extended sources, and interesting spatial structure is observed in many supernova remnants and clusters of galaxies. The instrument is very adept at mapping large areas of the X-ray sky. Also, as the slew survey is well matched to the ROSAT all-sky survey, long-term variability studies are possible, and a number of extremely variable X-ray sources, some possibly due to the tidal disruption of stars by central supermassive black holes, have been discovered.
  • We present the first results of mid-infrared (MIR) ultra-deep observations towards the lensing cluster Abell 2390 using the ISOCAM infrared camera on-board ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite. They reveal a large number of luminous MIR sources. Optical and near-infrared (NIR) cross-identification suggests that almost all 15 microns sources and about half of the 7 microns are identified with distant lensed galaxies. Thanks to the gravitational amplification these sources constitute the faintest MIR sources detected. We confirm that the number counts derived at 15 microns show a clear excess of sources with respect to the predictions of a no-evolution model. The possible extension of the NGST instrumentation from the near-IR (1-5 microns) to the thermal infrared, up to 20 microns (as suggested by the NGST task group report, October 1997) would permit study of this new population of dust-enshrouded AGN/starburst galaxies detected by ISOCAM, up to very high redshifts and with vastly improved spatial resolution. The existence of this population demonstrats that the discrimination of dust contributions, possible in the MIR, must be an important consideration in reaching an understanding of the Universe at high redshift. Therefore we stress that the access of NGST to the thermal infrared would increase tremendously its scientific potential to study the early universe.