• Context. The international whole earth blazar telescope (WEBT) consortium planned and carried out three days of intensive micro-variability observations of S5 0716+714 from February 22, 2009 to February 25, 2009. This object was chosen due to its bright apparent magnitude range, its high declination, and its very large duty cycle for micro-variations. Aims. We report here on the long continuous optical micro-variability light curve of 0716+714 obtained during the multi-site observing campaign during which the Blazar showed almost constant variability over a 0.5 magnitude range. The resulting light curve is presented here for the first time. Observations from participating observatories were corrected for instrumental differences and combined to construct the overall smoothed light curve. Methods. Thirty-six observatories in sixteen countries participated in this continuous monitoring program and twenty of them submitted data for compilation into a continuous light curve. The light curve was analyzed using several techniques including Fourier transform, Wavelet and noise analysis techniques. Those results led us to model the light curve by attributing the variations to a series of synchrotron pulses. Results. We have interpreted the observed microvariations in this extended light curve in terms of a new model consisting of individual stochastic pulses due to cells in a turbulent jet which are energized by a passing shock and cool by means of synchrotron emission. We obtained an excellent fit to the 72-hour light curve with the synchrotron pulse model.
  • We report results from a 1 week multi-wavelength campaign to monitor the BL Lac object S5 0716+714 (on December 9-16, 2009). In the radio bands the source shows rapid (~ (0.5-1.5) day) intra-day variability with peak amplitudes of up to ~ 10 %. The variability at 2.8 cm leads by about 1 day the variability at 6 cm and 11 cm. This time lag and more rapid variations suggests an intrinsic contribution to the source's intraday variability at 2.8 cm, while at 6 cm and 11 cm interstellar scintillation (ISS) seems to predominate. Large and quasi-sinusoidal variations of ~ 0.8 mag were detected in the V, R and I-bands. The X-ray data (0.2-10 keV) do not reveal significant variability on a 4 day time scale, favoring reprocessed inverse-Compton over synchrotron radiation in this band. The characteristic variability time scales in radio and optical bands are similar. A quasi-periodic variation (QPO) of 0.9 - 1.1 days in the optical data may be present, but if so it is marginal and limited to 2.2 cycles. Cross-correlations between radio and optical are discussed. The lack of a strong radio-optical correlation indicates different physical causes of variability (ISS at long radio wavelengths, source intrinsic origin in the optical), and is consistent with a high jet opacity and a compact synchrotron component peaking at ~= 100 GHz in an ongoing very prominent flux density outburst. For the campaign period, we construct a quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distribution (SED), including gamma-ray data from the FERMI satellite. We obtain lower limits for the relativistic Doppler-boosting of delta >= 12-26, which for a BL\,Lac type object, is remarkably high.
  • Rotation and magnetic activity are intimately linked in main-sequence stars of G or later spectral types. The presence and level of magnetic activity depend on stellar rotation, and rotation itself is strongly influenced by strength and topology of the magnetic fields. Open clusters represent especially useful targets to investigate the rotation/activity/age connection. The open cluster M11 has been studied as a part of the RACE-OC project (Rotation and ACtivity Evolution in Open Clusters), which is aimed at exploring the evolution of rotation and magnetic activity in the late-type members of open clusters with different ages. Photometric observations of the open cluster M11 were carried out in June 2004 using LOAO 1m telescope. The rotation periods of the cluster members are determined by Fourier analysis of photometric data time series. We further investigated the relations between the surface activity, characterized by the light curve amplitude, and rotation. We have discovered a total of 75 periodic variables in the M11 FoV, of which 38 are candidate cluster members. Specifically, among cluster members we discovered 6 early-type, 2 eclipsing binaries and 30 bona-fide single periodic late-type variables. Considering the rotation periods of 16 G-type members of the almost coeval 200-Myr M34 cluster, we could determine the rotation period distribution from a more numerous sample of 46 single G stars at an age of about 200-230 Myr and determine a median rotation period P=4.8d. A comparison with the younger M35 cluster (~150 Myr) and with the older M37 cluster (~550 Myr) shows that G stars rotate slower than younger M35 stars and faster than older M37 stars. The measured variation of the median rotation period is consistent with the scenario of rotational braking of main-sequence spotted stars as they age.