• In this work we present spectra of all $\gamma$-ray burst (GRB) afterglows that have been promptly observed with the X-shooter spectrograph until 31-03-2017. In total, we obtained spectroscopic observations of 103 individual GRBs observed within 48 hours of the GRB trigger. Redshifts have been measured for 97 per cent of these, covering a redshift range from 0.059 to 7.84. Based on a set of observational selection criteria that minimize biases with regards to intrinsic properties of the GRBs, the follow-up effort has been focused on producing a homogeneous sample of 93 afterglow spectra for GRBs discovered by the Swift satellite. We here provide a public release of all the reduced spectra, including continuum estimates and telluric absorption corrections. For completeness, we also provide reductions for the 18 late-time observations of the underlying host galaxies. We provide an assessment of the degree of completeness with respect to the parent GRB population, in terms of the X-ray properties of the bursts in the sample and find that the sample presented here is representative of the full Swift sample. We constrain the fraction of dark bursts to be < 28 per cent and we confirm previous results that higher optical darkness is correlated with increased X-ray absorption. For the 42 bursts for which it is possible, we provide a measurement of the neutral hydrogen column density, increasing the total number of published HI column density measurements by $\sim$ 33 per cent. This dataset provides a unique resource to study the ISM across cosmic time, from the local progenitor surroundings to the intervening universe.
  • The binary neutron star merger GW170817 was the first multi-messenger event observed in both gravitational and electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic signal began ~ 2 seconds after the merger with a weak, short burst of gamma-rays, which was followed over the course of the next hours and days by the ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared emission from a radioactively-powered kilonova. The low luminosity of the gamma-rays and the rising radio and X-ray flux from the source at late times could indicate that we are viewing this event outside the opening angle of the beamed relativistic jet launched during the merger. Alternatively, the emission could be arising from a cocoon of material formed from the interaction between a (possibly choked) jet and the merger ejecta. Here we present late-time optical detections and deep near-infrared limits on the emission from GW170817 at 110 days after the merger. Our new observations are at odds with expectations of late-time emission from kilonova models, being too bright and blue. Instead, this late-time optical emission arises from the optical afterglow of GRB 170817A, associated with GW170817. This emission matches the expectations of a structured relativistic jet, that would have launched a high luminosity short GRB to an aligned observer. The distinct predictions for the future optical behaviour in the structured-jet and cocoon models will directly distinguish the origin of the emission.
  • We here present the spectroscopic follow-up observations with VLT/X-shooter of the Swift long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 160804A at z = 0.737. Typically, GRBs are found in low-mass, metal-poor galaxies which constitute the sub-luminous population of star-forming galaxies. For the host galaxy of the GRB presented here we derive a stellar mass of $\log(M_*/M_{\odot}) = 9.80\pm 0.07$, a roughly solar metallicity (12+log(O/H) = $8.74\pm 0.12$) based on emission line diagnostics, and an infrared luminosity of $M_{3.6/(1+z)} = -21.94$ mag, but find it to be dust-poor ($E(B-V) < 0.05$ mag). This establishes the galaxy hosting GRB 160804A as one of the most luminous, massive and metal-rich GRB hosts at z < 1.5. Furthermore, the gas-phase metallicity is found to be representative of the physical conditions of the gas close to the explosion site of the burst. The high metallicity of the host galaxy is also observed in absorption, where we detect several strong FeII transitions as well as MgII and MgI. While host galaxy absorption features are common in GRB afterglow spectra, we detect absorption from strong metal lines directly in the host continuum (at a time when the afterglow was contributing to < 15%). Finally, we discuss the possibility that the geometry and state of the absorbing and emitting gas is indicative of a galactic scale outflow expelled at the final stage of two merging galaxies.
  • The SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES (SUSHIES) survey aims to provide strong new constraints on the progenitors of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) by understanding the relationship to their host galaxies. We present the photometric properties of 53 H-poor and 16 H-rich SLSN host galaxies out to $z\sim4$. We model their spectral energy distributions to derive physical properties, which we compare with other galaxy populations. At low redshift, H-poor SLSNe are preferentially found in very blue, low-mass galaxies with high average specific star-formation rates. As redshift increases, the host population follows the general evolution of star-forming galaxies towards more luminous galaxies. After accounting for secular evolution, we find evidence for differential evolution in galaxy mass, but not in the $B$-band and the far UV luminosity ($3\sigma$ confidence). Most remarkable is the scarcity of hosts with stellar masses above $10^{10}~M_\odot$ for both classes of SLSNe. In the case of H-poor SLSNe, we attribute this to a stifled production efficiency above $\sim0.4$ solar metallicity. However, we argue that, in addition to low metallicity, a short-lived stellar population is also required to regulate the SLSN production. H-rich SLSNe are found in a very diverse population of star-forming galaxies. Still, the scarcity of massive hosts suggests a stifled production efficiency above $\sim0.8$ solar metallicity. The large dispersion of the H-rich SLSNe host properties is in stark contrast to those of gamma-ray burst, regular core-collapse SN, and H-poor SLSNe host galaxies. We propose that multiple progenitor channels give rise to this sub-class.
  • Here we present an integral-field study of the massive, high-metallicity spiral NGC 3191, the host of SN 2017egm, the closest SLSN Type I to date. We use data from PMAS/CAHA and the public MaNGA survey to shed light on the properties of the SLSN site and the origin of star-formation in this non-starburst spiral galaxy. We map the physical properties different \ion{H}{II} regions throughout the galaxy and characterize their stellar populations using the STARLIGHT fitting code. Kinematical information allows to study a possible interaction with its neighbouring galaxy as the origin of recent star formation activity which could have caused the SLSN. NGC 3191 shows intense star-formation in the western part with three large SF regions of low metallicity. The central regions of the host have a higher metallicity, lower specific star-formation rate and lower ionization. Modeling the stellar populations gives a different picture: The SLSN region has two dominant stellar populations with different ages, the youngest one with an age of 2-10 Myr and lower metallicity, likely the population from which the SN progenitor originated. Emission line kinematics of NGC 3191 show indications of interaction with its neighbour MCG+08-19-017 at $\sim$45 kpc, which might be responsible for the recent starburst. In fact, this galaxy pair has in total hosted 4 SNe, 1988B (Type Ia), SN 2003ds (Type Ic in MCG+08-19-017), PTF10bgl (SLSN-Type II) and 2017egm, underlying the enhanced SF in both galaxies due to interaction. Our study shows that one has to be careful interpreting global host and even gas properties without looking at the stellar population history of the region. SLSNe seem to still be consistent with massive stars ($>$ 20 M$_\odot$) requiring low ($< 0.6Z_{\odot}$) metallicity and those environments can also occur in massive, late-type galaxies but not necessarily starbursts.
  • Previous studies have shown that the incidence rate of intervening strong MgII absorbers towards GRBs were a factor of 2 - 4 higher than towards quasars. Exploring the similar sized and uniformly selected legacy data sets XQ-100 and XSGRB, each consisting of 100 quasar and 81 GRB afterglow spectra obtained with a single instrument (VLT/X-shooter), we demonstrate that there is no disagreement in the number density of strong MgII absorbers with rest-frame equivalent widths $W_r^{2796} >$ 1 {\AA} towards GRBs and quasars in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 5. With large and similar sample sizes, and path length coverages of $\Delta$z = 57.8 and 254.4 for GRBs and quasars, respectively, the incidences of intervening absorbers are consistent within 1 sigma uncertainty levels at all redshifts. For absorbers at z < 2.3 the incidence towards GRBs is a factor of 1.5$\pm$0.4 higher than the expected number of strong MgII absorbers in SDSS quasar spectra, while for quasar absorbers observed with X-shooter we find an excess factor of 1.4$\pm$0.2 relative to SDSS quasars. Conversely, the incidence rates agree at all redshifts with reported high spectral resolution quasar data, and no excess is found. The only remaining discrepancy in incidences is between SDSS MgII catalogues and high spectral resolution studies. The rest-frame equivalent width distribution also agrees to within 1 sigma uncertainty levels between the GRB and quasar samples. Intervening strong MgII absorbers towards GRBs are therefore neither unusually frequent, nor unusually strong.
  • The low distance, $z=0.0591$, of GRB 100316D and its association with SN 2010bh represent two important motivations for studying this host galaxy and the GRB's immediate environment with the Integral-Field Spectrographs like VLT/MUSE. Its large field-of-view allows us to create 2D maps of gas metallicity, ionization level, and the star-formation rate distribution maps, as well as to investigate the presence of possible host companions. The host is a late-type dwarf irregular galaxy with multiple star-forming regions and an extended central region with signatures of on-going shock interactions. The GRB site is characterized by the lowest metallicity, the highest star-formation rate and the youngest ($\sim$ 20-30 Myr) stellar population in the galaxy, which suggest a GRB progenitor stellar population with masses up to 20 -- 40 $M_{\odot}$. We note that the GRB site has an offset of $\sim$660pc from the most luminous SF region in the host. The observed SF activity in this galaxy may have been triggered by a relatively recent gravitational encounter between the host and a small undetected ($L_{H\alpha} \leq 10^{36}$ erg/s) companion.
  • It is notoriously difficult to localize short $\gamma$-ray bursts (sGRBs) and their hosts to measure their redshifts. These measurements, however, are critical to constrain the nature of sGRB progenitors, their redshift distribution and the $r$-process element enrichment history of the universe. Here, we present spectroscopy of the host galaxy of GRB111117A and measure its redshift to be $z = 2.211$. This makes GRB111117A the most distant high-confidence short duration GRB detected to date. Our spectroscopic redshift supersedes a lower, previously estimated photometric redshift value for this burst. We use the spectroscopic redshift, as well as new imaging data to constrain the nature of the host galaxy and the physical parameters of the GRB. The rest-frame X-ray derived hydrogen column density, for example, is the highest compared to a complete sample of sGRBs and seems to follow the evolution with redshift as traced by the hosts of long GRBs (lGRBs). The host lies in the brighter end of the expected sGRB host brightness distribution at $z = 2.211$, and is actively forming stars. Using the host as a benchmark for redshift determination, we find that between 43 and 71 per cent of all sGRB redshifts should be missed due to host faintness for hosts at $z\sim2$. The high redshift of GRB111117A is evidence against a lognormal delay-time model for sGRBs through the predicted redshift distribution of sGRBs, which is very sensitive to high-$z$ sGRBs. From the age of the universe at the time of GRB explosion, an initial neutron star (NS) separation of $a_0 < 3.2~R_\odot$ is required in the case where the progenitor system is a circular pair of inspiralling NSs. This constraint excludes some of the longest sGRB formation channels for this burst.
  • Very massive stars in the final phases of their lives often show unpredictable outbursts that can mimic supernovae, so-called, "SN impostors", but the distinction is not always straigthforward. Here we present observations of a luminous blue variable (LBV) in NGC 2770 in outburst over more than 20 years that experienced a possible terminal explosion as type IIn SN in 2015, named SN 2015bh. This possible SN or "main event" was preceded by a precursor peaking $\sim$ 40 days before maximum. The total energy release of the main event is $\sim$1.8$\times$10$^{49}$ erg, which can be modeled by a $<$ 0.5 M$_\odot$ shell plunging into a dense CSM. All emission lines show a single narrow P-Cygni profile during the LBV phase and a double P-Cygni profile post maximum suggesting an association of this second component with the possible SN. Since 1994 the star has been redder than during a typical S-Dor like outburst. SN 2015bh lies within a spiral arm of NGC 2770 next to a number of small star-forming regions with a metallicity of $\sim$ 0.5 solar and a stellar population age of 7-10 Myr. SN 2015bh shares many similarities with SN 2009ip, which, together with other examples may form a new class of objects that exhibit outbursts a few decades prior to "hyper-eruption" or final core-collapse. If the star survives this event it is undoubtedly altered, and we suggest that these "zombie stars" may evolve from an LBV to a Wolf Rayet star over a very short timescale of only a few years. The final fate of these types of massive stars can only be determined with observations years after the possible SN.
  • We introduce the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey ("SHOALS"), a multi-observatory high-redshift galaxy survey targeting the largest unbiased sample of long-duration gamma-ray burst hosts yet assembled (119 in total). We describe the motivations of the survey and the development of our selection criteria, including an assessment of the impact of various observability metrics on the success rate of afterglow-based redshift measurement. We briefly outline our host-galaxy observational program, consisting of deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging of every field supplemented by similarly-deep, multi-color optical/NIR photometry, plus spectroscopy of events without pre-existing redshifts. Our optimized selection cuts combined with host-galaxy follow-up have so far enabled redshift measurements for 110 targets (92%) and placed upper limits on all but one of the remainder. About 20% of GRBs in the sample are heavily dust-obscured, and at most 2% originate from z>5.5. Using this sample we estimate the redshift-dependent GRB rate density, showing it to peak at z~2.5 and fall by about an order of magnitude towards low (z=0) redshift, while declining more gradually towards high (z~7) redshift. This behavior is consistent with a progenitor whose formation efficiency varies modestly over cosmic history. Our survey will permit the most detailed examination to date of the connection between the GRB host population and general star-forming galaxies, directly measure evolution in the host population over cosmic time and discern its causes, and provide new constraints on the fraction of cosmic star-formation occurring in undetectable galaxies at all redshifts.
  • We present optical and near-infrared photometry of GRB~140606B ($z=0.384$), and optical photometry and spectroscopy of its associated supernova (SN). The results of our modelling indicate that the bolometric properties of the SN ($M_{\rm Ni} = 0.4\pm0.2$~M$_{\odot}$, $M_{\rm ej} = 5\pm2$~M$_{\odot}$, and $E_{\rm K} = 2\pm1 \times 10^{52}$ erg) are fully consistent with the statistical averages determined for other GRB-SNe. However, in terms of its $\gamma$-ray emission, GRB~140606B is an outlier of the Amati relation, and occupies the same region as low-luminosity ($ll$) and short GRBs. The $\gamma$-ray emission in $ll$GRBs is thought to arise in some or all events from a shock-breakout (SBO), rather than from a jet. The measured peak photon energy ($E_{\rm p}\approx800$ keV) is close to that expected for $\gamma$-rays created by a SBO ($\gtrsim1$ MeV). Moreover, based on its position in the $M_{V,\rm p}$--$L_{\rm iso,\gamma}$~plane and the $E_{\rm K}$--$\Gamma\beta$~plane, GRB~140606B has properties similar to both SBO-GRBs and jetted-GRBs. Additionally, we searched for correlations between the isotropic $\gamma$-ray emission and the bolometric properties of a sample of GRB-SNe, finding that no statistically significant correlation is present. The average kinetic energy of the sample is $\bar{E}_{\rm K} = 2.1\times10^{52}$ erg. All of the GRB-SNe in our sample, with the exception of SN 2006aj, are within this range, which has implications for the total energy budget available to power both the relativistic and non-relativistic components in a GRB-SN event.
  • The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has greatly expanded the number and energy window of observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, the coarse localizations of tens to a hundred square degrees provided by the Fermi GRB Monitor instrument have posed a formidable obstacle to locating the bursts' host galaxies, measuring their redshifts, and tracking their panchromatic afterglows. We have built a target-of-opportunity mode for the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory in order to perform targeted searches for Fermi afterglows. Here, we present the results of one year of this program: 8 afterglow discoveries out of 35 searches. Two of the bursts with detected afterglows (GRBs 130702A and 140606B) were at low redshift (z=0.145 and 0.384 respectively) and had spectroscopically confirmed broad-line Type Ic supernovae. We present our broadband follow-up including spectroscopy as well as X-ray, UV, optical, millimeter, and radio observations. We study possible selection effects in the context of the total Fermi and Swift GRB samples. We identify one new outlier on the Amati relation. We find that two bursts are consistent with a mildly relativistic shock breaking out from the progenitor star, rather than the ultra-relativistic internal shock mechanism that powers standard cosmological bursts. Finally, in the context of the Zwicky Transient Facility, we discuss how we will continue to expand this effort to find optical counterparts of binary neutron star mergers that may soon be detected by Advanced LIGO and Virgo.
  • We present the first reported case of the simultaneous metallicity determination of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy, from both afterglow absorption lines as well as strong emission-line diagnostics. Using spectroscopic and imaging observations of the afterglow and host of the long-duration Swift GRB121024A at z = 2.30, we give one of the most complete views of a GRB host/environment to date. We observe a strong damped Ly-alpha absorber (DLA) with a hydrogen column density of log N(HI) = 21.88 +/- 0.10, H2 absorption in the Lyman-Werner bands (molecular fraction of log(f)~ -1.4; fourth solid detection of molecular hydrogen in a GRB-DLA), the nebular emission lines H-alpha, H-beta, [O II], [O III] and [N II], as well as metal absorption lines. We find a GRB host galaxy that is highly star-forming (SFR ~ 40 solar masses/yr ), with a dust-corrected metallicity along the line of sight of [Zn/H]corr = -0.6 +/- 0.2 ([O/H] ~ -0.3 from emission lines), and a depletion factor [Zn/Fe] = 0.85 +/- 0.04. The molecular gas is separated by 400 km/s (and 1-3 kpc) from the gas that is photoexcited by the GRB. This implies a fairly massive host, in agreement with the derived stellar mass of log(M/M_solar ) = 9.9+/- 0.2. We dissect the host galaxy by characterising its molecular component, the excited gas, and the line-emitting star-forming regions. The extinction curve for the line of sight is found to be unusually flat (Rv ~15). We discuss the possibility of an anomalous grain size distributions. We furthermore discuss the different metallicity determinations from both absorption and emission lines, which gives consistent results for the line of sight to GRB 121024A.
  • The progenitors of super luminous supernovae (SLSNe) are still a mystery. Hydrogen-poor SLSN hosts are often highly star-forming dwarf galaxies and the majority belongs to the class of extreme emission line galaxies hosting young and highly star-forming stellar populations. Here we present a resolved long-slit study of the host of the hydrogen-poor SLSN PTF12dam probing the kpc environment of the SN site to determine the age of the progenitor. The galaxy is a "tadpole" with uniform properties and the SN occurred in a star-forming region in the head of the tadpole. The galaxy experienced a recent star-burst superimposed on an underlying old stellar population. We measure a very young stellar population at the SN site with an age of ~3 Myr and a metallicity of 12+log(O/H)=8.0 at the SN site but do not observe any WR features. The progenitor of PTF12dam must have been a massive star of at least 60 M_solar and one of the first stars exploding as a SN in this extremely young starburst.
  • Context. Gamma-ray burst (GRBs) afterglows probe sightlines to star-forming regions in distant star-forming galaxies. Here we present a study of the peculiar afterglow spectrum of the z = 0.889 Swift GRB 140506A. Aims. Our aim is to understand the origin of the very unusual properties of the absorption along the line-of-sight. Methods. We analyse spectroscopic observations obtained with the X-shooter spectrograph mounted on the ESO/VLT at two epochs 8.8 h and 33 h after the burst as well as imaging from the GROND instrument. We also present imaging and spectroscopy of the host galaxy obtained with the Magellan telescope. Results. The underlying afterglow appears to be a typical afterglow of a long-duration GRB. However, the material along the line-of- sight has imprinted very unusual features on the spectrum. Firstly, there is a very broad and strong flux drop below 8000 AA (4000 AA in the rest frame), which seems to be variable between the two spectroscopic epochs. We can reproduce the flux-drops both as a giant 2175 AA extinction bump and as an effect of multiple scattering on dust grains in a dense environment. Secondly, we detect absorption lines from excited H i and He i. We also detect molecular absorption from CH+ . Conclusions. We interpret the unusual properties of these spectra as reflecting the presence of three distinct regions along the line-of-sight: the excited He i absorption originates from an H ii-region, whereas the Balmer absorption must originate from an associated photodissociation region. The strong metal line and molecular absorption and the dust extinction must originate from a third, cooler region along the line-of-sight. The presence of (at least) three separate regions is reflected in the fact that the different absorption components have different velocities relative to the systemic redshift of the host galaxy.
  • We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry for three gamma-ray burst supernovae (GRB-SNe): GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez and GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu. In the case of GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez, we also present optical spectroscopy at t-t0=16.1 d, which covers rest-frame 3000-6250 Angstroms. Based on Fe II (5169) and Si (II) (6355), our spectrum indicates an unusually low expansion velocity of 4000-6350 km/s, the lowest ever measured for a GRB-SN. Additionally, we determined the brightness and shape of each accompanying SN relative to a template supernova (SN 1998bw), which were used to estimate the amount of nickel produced via nucleosynthesis during each explosion. We find that our derived nickel masses are typical of other GRB-SNe, and greater than those of SNe Ibc that are not associated with GRBs. For GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu, we use our well-sampled R-band light curve (LC) to estimate the amount of ejecta mass and the kinetic energy of the SN, finding that these too are similar to other GRB-SNe. For GRB 130215A, we take advantage of contemporaneous optical/NIR observations to construct an optical/NIR bolometric LC of the afterglow. We fit the bolometric LC with the millisecond magnetar model of Zhang & Meszaros (2001), which considers dipole radiation as a source of energy injection to the forward shock powering the optical/NIR afterglow. Using this model we derive an initial spin period of P=12 ms and a magnetic field of B=1.1 x 10^15 G, which are commensurate with those found for proposed magnetar central engines of other long-duration GRBs.
  • At low redshift, a handful of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been discovered with peak luminosities ($L_{\rm iso} < 10^{48.5}~\rm{erg\,s}^{-1}$) substantially lower than the average of the more distant ones ($L_{\rm iso} > 10^{49.5}~\rm{erg\,s}^{-1}$). The properties of several low-luminosity (low-$L$) GRBs indicate that they can be due to shock break-out, as opposed to the emission from ultrarelativistic jets. Owing to this, it is highly debated how both populations are connected, and whether there is a continuum between them. The burst at redshift $z=0.283$ from 2012 April 22 is one of the very few examples of intermediate-$L$ GRBs with a $\gamma$-ray luminosity of $L\sim10^{48.9}~\rm{erg\,s}^{-1}$ that have been detected up to now. Together with the robust detection of its accompanying supernova SN 2012bz, it has the potential to answer important questions on the origin of low- and high-$L$ GRBs and the GRB-SN connection. We carried out a spectroscopy campaign using medium- and low-resolution spectrographs at 6--10-m class telescopes, covering the time span of 37.3 days, and a multi-wavelength imaging campaign from radio to X-ray energies over a duration of $\sim270$ days. Furthermore, we used a tuneable filter centred at H$\alpha$ to map star formation in the host galaxy and the surrounding galaxies. We used these data to extract and model the properties of different radiation components and incorporate spectral-energy-distribution fitting techniques to extract the properties of the host galaxy. Modelling the light curve and spectral energy distribution from the radio to the X-rays revealed the blast-wave to expand with an initial Lorentz factor of $\Gamma_0\sim60$, low for a high-$L$ GRB, and that the afterglow had an exceptional low peak luminosity-density of $\lesssim2\times10^{30}~\rm{erg\,s}^{-1}\,\rm{Hz}^{-1}$ in the sub-mm. [Abridged]
  • Galaxies selected through long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) could be of fundamental importance when mapping the star formation history out to the highest redshifts. Before using them as efficient tools in the early Universe, however, the environmental factors that govern the formation of GRBs need to be understood. Metallicity is theoretically thought to be a fundamental driver in GRB explosions and energetics, but is still, even after more than a decade of extensive studies, not fully understood. This is largely related to two phenomena: a dust-extinction bias, that prevented high-mass and thus likely high-metallicity GRB hosts to be detected in the first place, and a lack of efficient instrumentation, that limited spectroscopic studies including metallicity measurements to the low-redshift end of the GRB host population. The subject of this work is the very energetic GRB 110918A, for which we measure one of the largest host-integrated metallicities, ever, and the highest stellar mass for z<1.9. This presents one of the very few robust metallicity measurements of GRB hosts at z~1, and establishes that GRB hosts at z~1 can also be very metal rich. It conclusively rules out a metallicity cut-off in GRB host galaxies and argues against an anti-correlation between metallicity and energy release in GRBs.
  • Metallicity is theoretically thought to be a fundamental driver in gamma-ray burst (GRB) explosions and energetics, but is still, even after more than a decade of extensive studies, not fully understood. This is largely related to two phenomena: a dust-extinction bias, that prevented high-mass and thus likely high-metallicity GRB hosts to be detected in the first place, and a lack of efficient instrumentation, that limited spectroscopic studies including metallicity measurements to the low-redshift end of the GRB host population. The subject of this work is the very energetic GRB 110918A, for which we measure a redshift of z=0.984. GRB 110918A gave rise to a luminous afterglow with an intrinsic spectral slope of b=0.70, which probed a sight-line with little extinction (A_V=0.16 mag) typical of the established distributions of afterglow properties. Photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of the galaxy hosting GRB 110918A, including optical/NIR photometry with GROND and spectroscopy with VLT/X-shooter, however, reveal an all but average GRB host in comparison to the z~1 galaxies selected through similar afterglows to date. It has a large spatial extent with a half-light radius of ~10 kpc, the highest stellar mass for z<1.9 (log(M_*/M_sol) = 10.68+-0.16), and an Halpha-based star formation rate of 41 M_sol/yr. We measure a gas-phase extinction of ~1.8 mag through the Balmer decrement and one of the largest host-integrated metallicities ever of around solar (12 + log(O/H) = 8.93+/-0.13). This presents one of the very few robust metallicity measurements of GRB hosts at z~1, and establishes that GRB hosts at z~1 can also be very metal rich. It conclusively rules out a metallicity cut-off in GRB host galaxies and argues against an anti-correlation between metallicity and energy release in GRBs.
  • With the aim of characterizing the flux and color variations of the multiple components of the gravitationally lensed quasar UM673 as a function of time, we have performed multi-epoch and multi-band photometric observations with the Danish 1.54m telescope at the La Silla Observatory. The observations were carried out in the VRi spectral bands during four seasons (2008--2011). We reduced the data using the PSF (Point Spread Function) photometric technique as well as aperture photometry. Our results show for the brightest lensed component some significant decrease in flux between the first two seasons (+0.09/+0.11/+0.05 mag) and a subsequent increase during the following ones (-0.11/-0.11/-0.10 mag) in the V/R/i spectral bands, respectively. Comparing our results with previous studies, we find smaller color variations between these seasons as compared with previous ones. We also separate the contribution of the lensing galaxy from that of the fainter and close lensed component.
  • We present a 30-day monitoring campaign of the optical counterpart of the bright X-ray transient Swift J1745-26, starting only 19 minutes after the discovery of the source. We observe the system peaking at i' ~17.6 on day 6 (MJD 56192) to then decay at a rate of ~0.04 mag/day. We show that the optical peak occurs at least 3 days later than the hard X-ray (15-50 keV) flux peak. Our measurements result in an outburst amplitude greater than 4.3 magnitudes, which favours an orbital period < 21 h and a companion star with a spectral type later than ~ A0. Spectroscopic observations taken with the GTC-10.4 m telescope reveal a broad (FWHM ~ 1100 km/s), double-peaked H_alpha emission line from which we constrain the radial velocity semi-amplitude of the donor to be K_2 > 250 km/s. The breadth of the line and the observed optical and X-ray fluxes suggest that Swift J1745-26 is a new black hole candidate located closer than ~7 kpc.
  • We present our successful Chandra program designed to identify, with sub-arcsecond accuracy, the X-ray afterglow of the short GRB 111117A, which was discovered by Swift and Fermi. Thanks to our rapid target of opportunity request, Chandra clearly detected the X-ray afterglow, though no optical afterglow was found in deep optical observations. The host galaxy was clearly detected in the optical and near-infrared band, with the best photometric redshift of z=1.31_{-0.23}^{+0.46} (90% confidence), making it one of the highest known short GRB redshifts. Furthermore, we see an offset of 1.0 +- 0.2 arcseconds, which corresponds to 8.4 +- 1.7 kpc, between the host and the afterglow position. We discuss the importance of using Chandra for obtaining sub-arcsecond X-ray localizations of short GRB afterglows to study GRB environments.
  • GRBs generate an afterglow emission that can be detected from radio to X-rays during days, or even weeks after the initial explosion. The peak of this emission crosses the mm/submm range during the first hours to days, making their study in this range crucial for constraining the models. Observations have been limited until now due to the low sensitivity of the observatories in this range. We present observations of 10 GRB afterglows obtained from APEX and SMA, as well as the first detection of a GRB with ALMA, and put them into context with all the observations that have been published until now in the spectral range that will be covered by ALMA. The catalogue of mm/submm observations collected here is the largest to date and is composed of 102 GRBs, of which 88 had afterglow observations, whereas the rest are host galaxy searches. With our programmes, we contributed with data of 11 GRBs and the discovery of 2 submm counterparts. In total, the full sample, including data from the literature, has 22 afterglow detections with redshift ranging from 0.168 to 8.2. GRBs have been detected in mm/submm wavelengths with peak luminosities spanning 2.5 orders of magnitude, the most luminous reaching 10^33erg s^-1 Hz^-1. We observe a correlation between the X-ray brightness at 0.5 days and the mm/submm peak brightness. Finally we give a rough estimate of the distribution of peak flux densities of GRB afterglows, based on the current mm/submm sample. Observations in the mm/submm bands have been shown to be crucial for our understanding of the physics of GRBs, but have until now been limited by the sensitivity of the observatories. With the start of the operations at ALMA, the sensitivity will be increased by more than an order of magnitude. Our estimates predict that, once completed, ALMA will detect up to 98% of the afterglows if observed during the passage of the peak synchrotron emission.
  • Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most dramatic examples of massive stellar deaths, usually as- sociated with supernovae (Woosley et al. 2006). They release ultra-relativistic jets producing non-thermal emission through synchrotron radiation as they interact with the surrounding medium (Zhang et al. 2004). Here we report observations of the peculiar GRB 101225A (the "Christmas burst"). Its gamma-ray emission was exceptionally long and followed by a bright X-ray transient with a hot thermal component and an unusual optical counterpart. During the first 10 days, the optical emission evolved as an expanding, cooling blackbody after which an additional component, consistent with a faint supernova, emerged. We determine its distance to 1.6 Gpc by fitting the spectral-energy distribution and light curve of the optical emission with a GRB-supernova template. Deep optical observations may have revealed a faint, unresolved host galaxy. Our proposed progenitor is a helium star-neutron star merger that underwent a common envelope phase expelling its hydrogen envelope. The resulting explosion created a GRB-like jet which gets thermalized by interacting with the dense, previously ejected material and thus creating the observed black-body, until finally the emission from the supernova dominated. An alternative explanation is a minor body falling onto a neutron star in the Galaxy (Campana et al. 2011).
  • aims: We present VRi photometric observations of the quadruply imaged quasar HE 0435-1223, carried out with the Danish 1.54m telescope at the La Silla Observatory. Our aim was to monitor and study the magnitudes and colors of each lensed component as a function of time. methods: We monitored the object during two seasons (2008 and 2009) in the VRi spectral bands, and reduced the data with two independent techniques: difference imaging and PSF (Point Spread Function) fitting.results: Between these two seasons, our results show an evident decrease in flux by ~0.2-0.4 magnitudes of the four lensed components in the three filters. We also found a significant increase (~0.05-0.015) in their V-R and R-i color indices. conclusions: These flux and color variations are very likely caused by intrinsic variations of the quasar between the observed epochs. Microlensing effects probably also affect the brightest "A" lensed component.