• V923 Sco is a bright ($V$ = 5.91), nearby ($\pi$ = 15.46$\pm$0.40 mas) southern eclipsing binary. Because both components are slow rotators, the minimum masses of the components are known with 0.2% precision from spectroscopy. The system seems ideal for very precise mass, radius, and luminosity determinations and, owing to its proximity and long orbital period ($\sim$ 34.8 days), promises to be resolved with long-baseline interferometry. The principal aim is very accurate determinations of absolute stellar parameters for both components of the eclipsing binary and a model-independent determination of the distance.} New high-precision photometry of both eclipses of V923 Sco with the MOST satellite was obtained. The system was spatially resolved with the VLTI AMBER, PIONIER, and GRAVITY instruments at nine epochs. Combining the projected size of the spectroscopic orbit (in km) and visual orbit (in mas) the distance to the system is derived. Simultaneous analysis of photometric, spectroscopic, and interferometric data was performed to obtain a robust determination of the absolute parameters. Very precise absolute parameters of the components were derived in spite of the parameter correlations. The primary component is found to be overluminous for its mass. Combining spectroscopic and interferometric observations enabled us to determine the distance to V923 Sco with better than 0.2% precision, which provides a stringent test of Gaia parallaxes. It is shown that combining spectroscopic and interferometric observations of nearby eclipsing binaries can lead to extremely accurate parallaxes and stellar parameters.
  • The MOST space telescope observed four Cepheid variables so far, all of different subtypes. Here we summarize the results obtained and the possible ways to continue to study these stars.
  • Space-based photometric measurements first revealed low-amplitude irregularities in the pulsations of Cepheid stars, but their origins and how commonly they occur remain uncertain. To investigate this phenomenon, we present MOST space telescope photometry of two Cepheids. V473 Lyrae is a second-overtone, strongly modulated Cepheid, while U Trianguli Australis is a Cepheid pulsating simultaneously in the fundamental mode and first overtone. The nearly continuous, high-precision photometry reveals alternations in the amplitudes of cycles in V473 Lyr, the first case of period doubling detected in a classical Cepheid. In U TrA, we tentatively identify one peak as the $f_X$ or 0.61-type mode often seen in conjunction with the first radial overtone in Cepheids, but given the short length of the data, we cannot rule out that it is a combination peak instead. Ground-based photometry and spectroscopy were obtained to follow two modulation cycles in V473 Lyr and to better specify its physical parameters. The simultaneous data yield the phase lag parameter (the phase difference between maxima in luminosity and radial velocity) of a second-overtone Cepheid for the first time. We find no evidence for a period change in U TrA or an energy exchange between the fundamental mode and the first overtone during the last 50 years, contrary to earlier indications. Period doubling in V473 Lyr provides a strong argument that mode interactions do occur in some Cepheids and we may hypothesise that it could be behind the amplitude modulation, as recently proposed for Blazhko RR Lyrae stars.
  • Binary stars provide a valuable test of stellar structure and evolution, because the masses of the individual stellar components can be derived with high accuracy and in a model-independent way. In this work, we study Spica, an eccentric double-lined spectroscopic binary system with a beta Cep type variable primary component. We use state-of-the-art modelling tools to determine accurate orbital elements of the binary system and atmospheric parameters of both stellar components. We interpret the short-period variability intrinsic to the primary component, detected on top of the orbital motion both in the photometric and spectroscopic data. The non-LTE based spectrum analysis reveals two stars of similar atmospheric chemical composition consistent with the present day cosmic abundance standard defined by Nieva&Przybilla (2012). The masses and radii of the stars are found to be 11.43+/-1.15 M_sun and 7.21+/-0.75 M_sun, and 7.47+/-0.54 R_sun and 3.74+/-0.53 R_sun for the primary and secondary, respectively. We find the primary component to pulsate in three independent modes, of which one is identified as a radial mode, while the two others are found to be non-radial, low degree l modes. The frequency of one of these modes is an exact multiple of the orbital frequency, and the l=m=2 mode identification suggests a tidal nature for this particular mode. We find a very good agreement between the derived dynamical and evolutionary masses for the Spica system to within the observational errors of the measured masses. The age of the system is estimated to be 12.5+/-1 Myr.
  • The quantity and quality of satellite photometric data strings is revealing details in Cepheid variation at very low levels. Specifically, we observed a Cepheid pulsating in the fundamental mode and one pulsating in the first overtone with the Canadian MOST satellite. The 3.7-d period fundamental mode pulsator (RT Aur) has a light curve that repeats precisely, and can be modeled by a Fourier series very accurately. The overtone pulsator (SZ Tau, 3.1 d period) on the other hand shows light curve variation from cycle to cycle which we characterize by the variations in the Fourier parameters. We present arguments that we are seeing instability in the pulsation cycle of the overtone pulsator, and that this is also a characteristic of the O-C curves of overtone pulsators. On the other hand, deviations from cycle to cycle as a function of pulsation phase follow a similar pattern in both stars, increasing after minimum radius. In summary, pulsation in the overtone pulsator is less stable than that of the fundamental mode pulsator at both long and short timescales.
  • We demonstrate that a seismic analysis of stars in their earliest evolutionary phases is a powerful method to identify young stars and distinguish their evolutionary states. The early star that is born from the gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud reaches at some point sufficient temperature, mass and luminosity to be detected. Accretion stops and the pre-main sequence star that emerges is nearly fully convective and chemically homogeneous. It will continue to contract gravitationally until the density and temperature in the core are high enough to start nuclear burning of hydrogen. We show that there is a relationship between detected pulsation properties for a sample of young stars and their evolutionary status illustrating the potential of asteroseismology for the early evolutionary phases.
  • Fundamental mode classical Cepheids have light curves which repeat accurately enough that we can watch them evolve (change period). The new level of accuracy and quantity of data with the {\it Kepler} and {\it MOST} satellites probes this further. An intriguing result was found in the long time-series of Kepler data for V1154 Cyg the one classical Cepheid (fundamental mode, P = 4.9$^d$) in the field, which has short term changes in period ($\simeq$20 minutes), correlated for $\simeq$10 cycles (period jitter). To follow this up, we obtained a month long series of observations of the fundamental mode Cepheid RT Aur and the first overtone pulsator SZ Tau. RT Aur shows the traditional strict repetition of the light curve, with the Fourier amplitude ratio $R_1/R_2$ remaining nearly constant. The light curve of SZ Tau, on the other hand, fluctuates in amplitude ratio at the level of approximately $50\%$. Furthermore prewhitening the RT Aur data with 10 frequencies reduces the Fourier spectrum to noise. For SZ Tau, considerable power is left after this prewhitening in a complicated variety of frequencies.
  • KPD 1930+2752 is a short-period pulsating subdwarf B (sdB) star. It is also an ellipsoidal variable with a known binary period just over two hours. The companion is most likely a white dwarf and the total mass of the system is close to the Chandresakhar limit. In this paper we report the results of Whole Earth Telescope (WET) photometric observations during 2003 and a smaller multisite campaign from 2002. From 355 hours of WET data, we detect 68 pulsation frequencies and suggest an additional 13 frequencies within a crowded and complex temporal spectrum between 3065 and 6343 $\mu$Hz (periods between 326 and 157 s). We examine pulsation properties including phase and amplitude stability in an attempt to understand the nature of the pulsation mechanism. We examine a stochastic mechanism by comparing amplitude variations with simulated stochastic data. We also use the binary nature of KPD 1930+2752 for identifying pulsation modes via multiplet structure and a tidally-induced pulsation geometry. Our results indicate a complicated pulsation structure that includes short-period ($\approx 16$ h) amplitude variability, rotationally split modes, tidally-induced modes, and some pulsations which are geometrically limited on the sdB star.
  • Context. Observations and analysis of solar-type oscillations in red-giant stars is an emerging aspect of asteroseismic analysis with a number of open questions yet to be explored. Although stochastic oscillations have previously been detected in red giants from both radial velocity and photometric measurements, those data were either too short or had sampling that was not complete enough to perform a detailed data analysis of the variability. The quality and quantity of photometric data as provided by the CoRoT satellite is necessary to provide a breakthrough in observing p-mode oscillations in red giants. We have analyzed continuous photometric time-series of about 11 400 relatively faint stars obtained in the exofield of CoRoT during the first 150 days long-run campaign from May to October 2007. We find several hundred stars showing a clear power excess in a frequency and amplitude range expected for red-giant pulsators. In this paper we present first results on a sub-sample of these stars. Aims. Knowing reliable fundamental parameters like mass and radius is essential for detailed asteroseismic studies of red-giant stars. As the CoRoT exofield targets are relatively faint (11-16 mag) there are no (or only weak) constraints on the star's location in the H-R diagram. We therefore aim to extract information about such fundamental parameters solely from the available time series. Methods. We model the convective background noise and the power excess hump due to pulsation with a global model fit and deduce reliable estimates for the stellar mass and radius from scaling relations for the frequency of maximum oscillation power and the characteristic frequency separation.
  • The MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars) satellite has discovered SPBe (Slowly Pulsating Be) oscillations in the stars HD 127756 (B1/B2 Vne) and HD 217543 (B3 Vpe). For HD 127756, 30 significant frequencies are identified from 31 days of nearly continuous photometry; for HD 217543, up to 40 significant frequencies from 26 days of data. In both cases, the oscillations fall into three distinct frequency ranges, consistent with models of the stars. The variations are caused by nonradial g-modes (and possibly r-modes) distorted by rapid rotation and excited by the opacity mechanism near the iron opacity bump. A comparison of pulsation models and observed frequency groups yields a rotation frequency for each star, independently of vsini. The rotation rates of these stars, as well as those of the SPBe stars previously discovered by MOST, HD 163868 and $\beta$ CMi, are all close to their critical values.
  • We present 10.27$ \rm{hrs}$ of photometry of the roAp star HD 134214 obtained by the MOST satellite. The star is shown to be monoperiodic and oscillating at a frequency of 2948.97$ \pm 0.55 \mu\rm{Hz}$. This is consistent with earlier ground based photometric campaigns (e.g. Kreidl et al. 1994). We do not detect any of the additional frequencies identified in the recent spectroscopic study by Kurtz et al. (2006) down to an amplitude limit of 0.36$ \rm{mmag}$ ($2\sigma$ significance limit).
  • We present a total of 57 days of contiguous, high-cadence photometry (14 days in 2004 and 43 in 2005) of the star BD+18 4914 obtained with the MOST satellite. We detect 16 frequencies down to a signal-to-noise of 3.6 (amplitude \~ 0.5 mmag). Six of these are less than 3 cycles/day, and the other ten are between 7 and 16 cycles/day. We intrepret the low frequencies as g-mode $\gamma$ Doradus-type pulsations and the others as $\delta$ Scuti-type p-modes, making BD+18 4914 one of the few known hybrid pulsators of its class. If the g-mode pulsations are high-overtone non-radial modes with identical low degree l, we can assign a unique mode classification of n={12, 20, 21, 22, 31, 38} based on the frequency ratio method.
  • The Microvariability and Oscillations of stars (MOST) satellite has detected low-amplitude light variations ($\Delta m\sim$1 mmag) in the Be star $\beta$ CMi (B8Ve). The observations lasted 41 days and the variations have typical periods $\sim 0.3$ days. We demonstrate that the dominant frequencies are consistent with prograde high-order g-modes of $m=-1$ excited by the Fe-bump of opacity in an intermediate-mass ($\approx 3.5 M_\odot$) star with a nearly critical rotation period of 0.38 days. This is the first detection of nonradial g-mode pulsations in a Be star later than B6 leading to the possibility that pulsations are excited in all classical Be stars.
  • The {\it Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST)} satellite observed the B supergiant HD 163899 (B2 Ib/II) for 37 days as a guide star and detected 48 frequencies $\la$ 2.8 c d$^{-1}$ with amplitudes of a few milli-magnitudes (mmag) and less. The frequency range embraces g- and p-mode pulsations. It was generally thought that no g-modes are excited in less luminous B supergiants because strong radiative damping is expected in the core. Our theoretical models, however, show that such g-modes are excited in massive post-main-sequence stars, in accordance with these observations. The nonradial pulsations excited in models between $20M_\odot$ at $\log T_{\rm eff} \approx 4.41$ and $15M_\odot$ at $\log T_{\rm eff} \approx 4.36$ are roughly consistent with the observed frequency range. Excitation by the Fe-bump in opacity is possible because g-modes can be partially reflected at a convective zone associated with the hydrogen-burning shell, which significantly reduces radiative damping in the core. The {\it MOST} light curve of HD 163899 shows that such a reflection of g-modes actually occurs, and reveals the existence of a previously unrecognized type of variable, slowly pulsating B supergiants (SPBsg) distinct from $\alpha$ Cyg variables. Such g-modes have great potential for asteroseismology.