• Gamma-Ray Bursts can provide information about star formation at high redshifts. Even in the absence of a optical/near-infrared/radio afterglow, the high detection rate of X-ray afterglows by swift/XRT and its localization precision of 2-3 arcsec facilitates the identification and study of GRB host galaxies. We focus on the search for the host galaxies of a sample of 17 bursts with XRT error circles but no detected long-wavelength afterglow. Three of these events can also be classified as truly dark bursts: the observed upper limit on the optical flux of the afterglow was less than expected based on the X-ray flux. Our study is based on deep R and K-band observations performed with ESO/VLT instruments, supported by GROND and NEWFIRM. To be conservative, we searched for host galaxies in an area with a radius twice the 90% swift/XRT error circle. For 15 of the 17 bursts we find at least one galaxy inside the doubled XRT error circle. In seven cases we discover extremely red objects in the error circles. The most remarkable case is the host of GRB 080207 which as a colour of R-K~4.7 mag (AB), one of the reddest galaxies ever associated with a GRB. As a by-product of our study we identify the optical afterglow of GRB 070517A. Optically dim afterglows result from cosmological Lyman drop out and dust extinction, but the former process is only equired for a minority of cases (<1/3). Extinction by dust in the host galaxies might explain all other events. Thereby, a seemingly non-negligible fraction of these hosts are globally dust-enshrouded, extremely red galaxies. This suggests that bursts with optically dim afterglows trace a subpopulation of massive starburst galaxies, which are markedly different from the main body of the GRB host galaxy population, namely the blue, subluminous, compact galaxies.
  • The XMM-Newton Distant Cluster Project is a serendipitous survey for clusters of galaxies at redshifts z>=0.8 based on deep archival XMM-Newton observations. ... Low-significance candidate high-z clusters are followed up with the seven-channel imager GROND (Gamma-Ray Burst Optical and Near-Infrared Detector) that is mounted at a 2m-class telescope. ... The test case is XMMU J0338.7+0030, suggested to be at z~1.45+/-0.15 from the analysis of the z-H vs H colour-magnitude diagram obtained from the follow-up imaging. Later VLT-FORS2 spectroscopy enabled us to identify four members, which set this cluster at z=1.097+/-0.002. To reach a better knowledge of its galaxy population, we observed XMMU J0338.7+0030 with GROND for about 6 hr. The publicly available photo-z code le Phare was used. The Ks-band number counts of the non-stellar sources out of the 832 detected down to z'~26 AB-mag in the 3.9x4.3 square arcmin region of XMMU J0338.7+0030 imaged at all GROND bands clearly exceed those computed in deep fields/survey areas at ~20.5 - 22.5 AB-mag. The photo-z's of the three imaged spectroscopic members yield z=1.12+/-0.09. The spatial distribution and the properties of the GROND sources with a photo-z in the range 1.01 - 1.23 confirm the correspondence of the X-ray source with a galaxy over-density at a significance of at least 4.3 sigma. Candidate members that are spectro-photometrically classified as elliptical galaxies define a red locus in the i'-z' vs z' colour-magnitude diagram that is consistent with the red sequence of the cluster RDCS J0910+5422 at z=1.106. XMMU J0338.7+0030 hosts also a population of bluer late-type spirals and irregulars. The starbursts among the photometric members populate both loci, consistently with previous results. The analysis of the available data set indicates that XMMU J0338.7+0030 is a low-mass cluster (M_200 ~ 1E14 M_sun) at z=1.1. (Abridged)
  • We report on the surprisingly high metallicity measured in two absorption systems at high redshift, detected in the Very Large Telescope spectrum of the afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 090323. The two systems, at redshift z=3.5673 and z=3.5774 (separation Delta v ~ 660 km/s), are dominated by the neutral gas in the interstellar medium of the parent galaxies. From the singly ionized zinc and sulfur, we estimate oversolar metallicities of [Zn/H] =+0.29+/-0.10 and [S/H] = +0.67+/- 0.34, in the blue and red absorber, respectively. These are the highest metallicities ever measured in galaxies at z>3. We propose that the two systems trace two galaxies in the process of merging, whose star formation and metallicity are heightened by the interaction. This enhanced star formation might also have triggered the birth of the GRB progenitor. As typically seen in star-forming galaxies, the fine-structure absorption SiII* is detected, both in G0 and G1. From the rest-frame UV emission in the GRB location, we derive a relatively high, not corrected for dust extinction, star-formation rate SFR ~ 6 Msun/yr. These properties suggest a possible connection between some high-redshift GRB host galaxies and high-z massive sub-millimeter galaxies, which are characterized by disturbed morphologies and high metallicities. Our result provides additional evidence that the dispersion in the chemical enrichment of the Universe at high redshift is substantial, with the existence of very metal rich galaxies less than two billion years after the Big Bang.
  • (Abridged) Until recently the information inferred from gamma-ray burst follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows, biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Here, we present GRB afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies, and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder, more luminous and massive than the hosts of optically-bright events. We hence probe a different galaxy population, suggesting that previous host samples miss most of the massive, chemically-evolved and metal-rich members. This also indicates that the dust along the sight-line is often related to host properties, and thus probably located in the diffuse ISM or interstellar clouds and not in the immediate GRB environment. Some of the hosts in our sample, are blue, young or of small stellar mass illustrating that even apparently non-extinguished galaxies possess very dusty sight-lines due to a patchy dust distribution. The presented observations establish a population of luminous, massive and correspondingly chemically-evolved GRB hosts. This suggests that GRBs trace the global star-formation rate better than studies based on optically-selected host samples indicate, and the previously-claimed deficiency of high-mass host galaxies was at least partially a selection effect.
  • Context. After the launch of the Swift satellite, the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) optical light-curve smoothness paradigm has been questioned thanks to the faster and better sampled optical follow-up, which has unveiled a very complex behaviour. This complexity is triggering the interest of the whole GRB community. The GROND multi-channel imager is used to study optical and near-infrared (NIR) afterglows of GRBs with unprecedented optical and near-infrared temporal and spectral resolution. The GRB 081029 has a very prominent optical rebrightening event and is an outstanding example of the application of the multi-channel imager to GRB afterglows. Aims. Here we exploit the rich GROND multi-colour follow-up of GRB 081029 combined with XRT observations to study the nature of late-time rebrightenings that appear in the optical-NIR light-curves of some GRB afterglows. Methods. We analyse the optical and NIR observations obtained with the seven-channel Gamma-Ray burst Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND) at the 2.2 m MPI/ESO telescope and the X-ray data obtained with the XRT telescope on board the Swift observatory. The multi-wavelength temporal and spectral evolution is discussed in the framework of different physical models. Results. The extremely steep optical and NIR rebrightening observed in GRB 081029 cannot be explained in the framework of the standard forward shock afterglow model. The absence of a contemporaneous X-ray rebrightening and the evidence of a strong spectral evolution in the optical-NIR bands during the rise suggest two separate components that dominate in the early and late-time lightcurves, respectively. The steepness of the optical rise cannot be explained even in the framework of the alternative scenarios proposed in the literature unless a late-time activity of the central engine is assumed.
  • We report on the discovery and properties of the fading afterglow and underlying host galaxy of GRB 071028B, thereby facilitating a detailed comparison between these two. Observations were performed with the Gamma-ray Burst Optical and Near-infrared Detector at the 2.2 m telescope on the La Silla Paranal Observatory in Chile. We conducted five observations from 1.9 d to 227.2 d after the trigger and obtained deep images in the g'r'i'z' and JHKs bands. Based on accurate seven-channel photometry covering the optical to near-infrared wavelength range, we derive a photometric redshift of z = 0.94 +0.05 -0.10 for the unabsorbed host galaxy of GRB 071028B. In contrast, we show that the afterglow with an intrinsic extinction of AV(SB) = (0.70 +/- 0.11) mag is moderately absorbed and requires a relatively flat extinction curve. According to the reported Swift/BAT observations, the energetics yield an isotropic energy release of E(gamma,iso.,rest) = (1.4 +2.4 -0.7) x 10^51 erg.
  • We present the results of a comprehensive study of the gamma-ray burst 080928 and of its afterglow. GRB 080928 was a long burst detected by Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM. It is one of the exceptional cases where optical emission had already been detected when the GRB itself was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. For nearly 100 seconds simultaneous optical, X-ray and gamma-ray data provide a coverage of the spectral energy distribution of the transient source from about 1 eV to 150 keV. In particular, we show that the SED during the main prompt emission phase agrees with synchrotron radiation. We constructed the optical/near-infrared light curve and the spectral energy distribution based on Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIa (Australia), and GROND (La Silla) data and compared it to the X-ray light curve retrieved from the Swift/XRT repository. We show that its bumpy shape can be modeled by multiple energy-injections into the forward shock.Furthermore, we investigate whether the temporal and spectral evolution of the tail emission of the first strong flare seen in the early X-ray light curve can be explained by large-angle emission (LAE). We find that a nonstandard LAE model is required to explain the observations. Finally, we report on the results of our search for the GRB host galaxy, for which only a deep upper limit can be provided.
  • The quick and precise localization of GRBs by the Swift telescope allows the early evolution of the afterglow light curve to be captured by ground-based telescopes. With GROND measurements we can investigate the optical/near-infrared light curve of the afterglow of gamma-ray burst 080413B in the context of late rebrightening. Multi-wavelength follow-up observations were performed on the afterglow of GRB 080413B. X-ray emission was detected by the X-ray telescope onboard the Swift satellite and obtained from the public archive. Optical and near-infrared photometry was performed with the seven-channel imager GROND mounted at the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope and additionally with the REM telescope, both in La Silla, Chile. The light curve model was constructed using the obtained broad-band data. The broad-band light curve of the afterglow of GRB 080413B is well fitted with an on-axis two-component jet model. The narrow ultra-relativistic jet is responsible for the initial decay, while the rise of the moderately relativistic wider jet near its deceleration time is the cause of the rebrightening of the light curve. The later evolution of the optical/NIR light curve is then dominated by the wide component, the signature of which is almost negligible in the X-ray wavelengths. These components have opening angles of theta(narrow) ~1.7 degrees and theta(wide) ~9 degrees, and Lorentz factors of Gamma(narrow) >188 and Gamma(wide) ~18.5. We calculated the beaming-corrected energy release to be 7.9 x 10^48 erg.
  • We present a framework to obtain photometric redshifts (photo-zs) for gamma-ray burst afterglows. Using multi-band photometry from GROND and Swift/UVOT, photo-zs are derived for five GRBs for which spectroscopic redshifts are not available. We use UV/optical/NIR data and synthetic photometry based on afterglow observations and theory to derive the photometric redshifts of GRBs and their accuracy. Taking into account the afterglow synchrotron emission properties, we investigate the application of photometry to derive redshifts in a theoretical range between z~1 and z~12. The measurement of photo-zs for GRB afterglows provides a quick, robust and reliable determination of the distance scale to the burst, particularly in those cases where spectroscopic observations in the optical/NIR range cannot be obtained. Given a sufficiently bright and mildly reddened afterglow, the relative photo-z accuracy is better than 10% between z=1.5 and z~7 and better than 5% between z=2 and z=6. We detail the approach on 5 sources without spectroscopic redshifts observed with UVOT on-board Swift and/or GROND. The distance scale to those same afterglows is measured to be $z=4.31^{+0.14}_{-0.15}$ for GRB 080825B, $z=2.13^{+0.14}_{-0.20}$ for GRB 080906, $z=3.44^{+0.15}_{-0.32}$ for GRB 081228, $z=2.03^{+0.16}_{-0.14}$ for GRB 081230 and $z=1.28^{+0.16}_{-0.15}$ for GRB 090530. Combining the response from UVOT with ground-based observatories and in particular GROND operating in the optical/NIR wavelength regime, reliable photo-zs can be obtained from z ~ 1.0 out to z ~ 10, and possibly even at higher redshifts in some favorable cases, provided that these GRBs exist, are localized quickly, have sufficiently bright afterglows and are not heavily obscured.
  • Context: Thirteen years after the discovery of the first afterglows, the nature of dark gamma-ray bursts (GRB) still eludes explanation: while each ng-duration GRB typically has an X-ray afterglow, optical/NIR emission is only seen for 40-60% of them. Aim: Here we use the afterglow detection statistics of the systematic follow-up observations performed with GROND since mid-2007 in order to derive the fraction of "dark bursts" according to different methods, and to distinguish between various scenarios for "dark bursts". Method: Observations were performed with the 7-channel "Gamma-Ray Optical and Near-infrared Detector" (GROND) at the 2.2m MPI/ESO telescope. We used the afterglow detection rate in dependence on the delay time between GRB and the first GROND exposure. Results: For long-duration Swift bursts with a detected X-ray afterglow, we achieve a 90% (35/39) detection rate of optical/NIR afterglows whenever our observations started within less than 240\,min after the burst. Complementing our GROND data with Swift/XRT spectra we construct broad-band spectral energy distributions and derive rest-frame extinctions. e detect 25-40% "dark bursts", depending on the definition used. The faint optical afterglow emission of "dark bursts" is mainly due to a combination of two contributing factors: (i) moderate intrinsic extinction at moderate redshifts, and (ii) about 22% of "dark" bursts at redshift $>$5.
  • Aims: GRB 050502B is well known for the very bright flare displayed in its X-ray light curve. Despite extensive studies, however, the optical light curve has never been discussed and its redshift is unconstrained. Possible correlations between optical and X-ray data are analysed. Methods: Photometric data from TNG in the R and I bands were used to compare the optical afterglow with the X-ray light curve. The HyperZ package and a late time VLT host observation were used to derive redshift estimates. Results: The I-band afterglow decay followed a power-law of index {\alpha} = 2.1 $\pm$ 0.6, after a late break at ~ $1.3 \times 10^5$ s. The R - I color is remarkably red and the broadband spectral index {\beta}_OX = $0.9 \pm 0.1$ is consistent with the X-ray spectral slope {\beta}_X. Although a photometric redshift of z > 4 is the most conservative result to consider, a photometric redshift of z = 5.2 $\pm$ 0.3 is suggested with no extinction in the host, based on which an isotropic energy E_{\gamma},iso = $(3.8 \pm 0.7) \times 10^52$ erg and a jet opening angle {\theta} ~ $3.7^{\circ}$ are subsequently derived. Conclusions: The combined X-ray and optical data suggest an achromatic break, which we interpret as a jet break. The post jet break slope obeys roughly the closure relation for the jet slow cooling model. Because of the afterglow's very red color, in order for the redshift to be low (z < 1), extinction, if present in the host, must be significantly high. Since the optical-to-X-ray index is consistent with the X-ray spectrum, and there is no XRT evidence for excess N_H, GRB 050502B was likely at high redshift.
  • Fermi can measure the spectral properties of gamma-ray bursts over a very large energy range and is opening a new window on the prompt emission of these energetic events. Localizations by the instruments on Fermi in combination with follow-up by Swift provide accurate positions for observations at longer wavelengths leading to the determination of redshifts, the true energy budget, host galaxy properties and facilitate comparison with pre-Fermi bursts. Multi-wavelength follow-up observations were performed on the afterglows of four bursts with high energy emission detected by Fermi/LAT : GRB090323, GRB090328, GRB090510 and GRB090902B. They were obtained in the optical/near-infrared bands with GROND mounted at the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope and additionally of GRB090323 in the optical with the 2 m telescope in Tautenburg, Germany. Three of the events are classified as long bursts while GRB090510 is a well localized short GRB with GeV emission. In addition, host galaxies were detected for three of the four bursts. Spectroscopic follow-up was initiated with the VLT for GRB090328 and GRB090510. The afterglow observations in 7 bands are presented for all bursts and their host galaxies are investigated. Knowledge of the distance and the local dust extinction enables comparison of the afterglows of LAT-detected GRBs with the general sample. The spectroscopic redshifts of GRB090328 and GRB090510 were determined to be z=0.7354+/-0.0003 and z=0.903 +/- 0.001 and dust corrected star-formation rates of 4.8 Mdot yr^-1 and 0.60 M_dot yr^-1 were derived for their host galaxies, respectively. The afterglows of long bursts exhibit power-law decay indices alpha from less than 1 to ~2.3 and spectral indices (beta) values from 0.65 to ~1.2 which are fairly standard for GRB afterglows. Constraints are placed on the jet half opening angles of less than 2.1 deg to greater than 6.4 deg which allows limits to be placed on the beaming corrected energies. These range from less than 5x10^50 erg to the one of the highest values ever recorded, greater than 2.2x10^52 erg for GRB090902B, and are not consistent with a standard candle. The extremely energetic long Fermi bursts have optical afterglows which lie in the top half of the brightness distribution of all optical afterglows detected in the Swift era or even in the top 5% if incompleteness is considered. The properties of the host galaxies of these LAT detected bursts in terms of extinction, star formation rates and masses do not appear to differ from previous samples.
  • Benchmark brown dwarfs are those objects for which fiducial constraints are available, including effective temperature, parallax, age, metallicity. We searched for new cool brown dwarfs in 186 sq.deg. of the new area covered by the data release DR5+ of the UKIDSS Large Area Survey. Follow-up optical and near-infrared broad-band photometry, and methane imaging of four promising candidates, revealed three objects with distinct methane absorption, typical of mid- to late-T dwarfs, and one possibly T4 dwarf. The latest-type object, classified as T8-9, shares its large proper motion with Ross 458 (BD+13o2618), an active M0.5 binary which is 102" away, forming a hierarchical low-mass star+brown dwarf system. Ross 458C has an absolute J-band magnitude of 16.4, and seems overluminous, particularly in the K band, compared to similar field brown dwarfs. We estimate the age of the system to be less than 1 Gyr, and its mass to be as low as 14 Jupiter masses for the age of 1 Gyr. At 11.4 pc, this new late T benchmark dwarf is a promising target to constrain the evolutionary and atmospheric models of very low-mass brown dwarfs. We present proper motion measurements for our targets and for 13 known brown dwarfs. Two brown dwarfs have velocities typical of the thick disk and may be old brown dwarfs.
  • We investigate the optical/near-infrared light curve of the afterglow of GRB 080710 in the context of rising afterglows. Optical and near-infrared photometry was performed using the seven channel imager GROND and the Tautenburg Schmidt telescope. X-ray data were provided by the X-ray Telescope onboard the Swift satellite. The optical/NIR light curve of the afterglow of GRB 080710 is dominated by an initial increase in brightness, which smoothly turns over into a shallow power law decay. The initially rising achromatic light curve of the afterglow of GRB 080710 can be accounted for with a model of a burst viewed off-axis or a single jet in its pre deceleration phase and in an on-axis geometry. An unified picture of the afterglow light curve and prompt emission properties can be obtained with an off-axis geometry, suggesting that late and shallow rising optical light curves of GRB afterglows might be produced by geometric effects.
  • X-ray flashes (XRFs) are a class of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the peak energy of the time-integrated spectrum, Ep, below 30 keV, whereas classical GRBs have Ep of a few hundreds keV. Apart from Ep and the lower luminosity, the properties of XRFs are typical of the classical GRBs. Yet, the nature of XRFs and the differences from that of GRBs are not understood. In addition, there is no consensus on the interpretation of the shallow decay phase observed in most X-ray afterglows of both XRFs and GRBs. We examine in detail the case of XRF 080330 discovered by Swift at the redshift of 1.51. This burst is representative of the XRF class and exhibits an X-ray shallow decay. The rich and broadband (from NIR to UV) photometric data set we collected across this phase makes it an ideal candidate to test the off-axis jet interpretation proposed to explain both the softness of XRFs and the shallow decay phase. We present prompt gamma-ray, early and late IR/visible/UV and X-ray observations of the XRF 080330. We derive a SED from NIR to X-ray bands across the plateau phase with a power-law index of 0.79 +- 0.01 and negligible rest-frame dust extinction. The multi-wavelength evolution of the afterglow is achromatic from ~10^2 s out to ~8x10^4 s. We describe the temporal evolution of the multi-wavelength afterglow within the context of the standard afterglow model and show that a single-component jet viewed off-axis explains the observations (abriged).
  • We present a densely sampled early light curve of the optical/near-infrared (NIR) afterglow of the X-Ray Flash (XRF) 071031 at z=2.692. Simultaneous and continuous observations in seven photometric bands from g' to K with GROND at the 2.2 m MPI/ESO telescope on LaSilla were performed between 4 minutes and 7 hours after the burst. The light curve consists of 547 individual points which allows us to study the early evolution of the optical transient associated with XRF 071031 in great detail. The optical/NIR light curve is dominated by an early increase in brightness which can be attributed to the apparent onset of the forward shock emission. There are several bumps which are superimposed onto the overall rise and decay. Significant flaring is also visible in the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curve from early to late times. The availability of high quality, broadband data enables detailed studies of the connection between the X-ray and optical/NIR afterglow and its colour evolution during the first night post burst. We find evidence of spectral hardening in the optical bands contemporaneous with the emergence of the bumps from an underlying afterglow component. The bumps in the optical/NIR light curve can be associated with flares in the X-ray regime suggesting late central engine activity as the common origin.
  • The detection of GeV photons from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has important consequences for the interpretation and modelling of these most-energetic cosmological explosions. The full exploitation of the high-energy measurements relies, however, on the accurate knowledge of the distance to the events. Here we report on the discovery of the afterglow and subsequent redshift determination of GRB 080916C, the first GRB detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope with high significance detection of photons at >0.1 GeV. Observations were done with 7-channel imager GROND at the 2.2m MPI/ESO telescope, the SIRIUS instrument at the Nagoya-SAAO 1.4m telescope in South Africa, and the GMOS instrument at Gemini-S. The afterglow photometric redshift of z=4.35+-0.15, based on simultaneous 7-filter observations with the Gamma-Ray Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND), places GRB 080916C among the top 5% most distant GRBs, and makes it the most energetic GRB known to date. The detection of GeV photons from such a distant event is rather surprising. The observed gamma-ray variability in the prompt emission together with the redshift suggests a lower limit for the Lorentz factor of the ultra-relativistic ejecta of Gamma > 1090. This value rivals any previous measurements of Gamma in GRBs and strengthens the extreme nature of GRB 080916C.
  • Tidal disruption events are possible sources of temporary nuclear activity in galactic nuclei and can be considered as good indicators of the existence of super massive black holes in the centers of galaxies. A new X-ray source has been serendipitously detected with ROSAT in a PSPC pointed observation of the galaxy cluster A3571. Given the strong flux decay of the object in subsequent detections, the tidal disruption scenario is investigated as possible explanationof the event. We followed up the evolution of the X-ray transient with ROSAT, XMM-Newton and Chandra for a total period of ~13 years. We also obtained 7-band optical/NIR photometry with GROND at the ESO/MPI 2.2m telescope. We report a very large decay of the X-ray flux of ROSAT source identified with the galaxy LEDA 095953 a member of the cluster Abell 3571. We measured a maximum 0.3-2.4 keV luminosity Log(L_X)=42.8 erg s^-1. The high state of the source lasted at least 150 ks, afterwards L_X declined as ~t^-2. The spectrum of the brightest epoch is consistent with a black body with temperature kT ~0.12 keV. The total energy released by this event in 10 yr was estimated to be Delta_E>2x10^50 erg. We interpret this event as a tidal disruption of a solar type star by the central supermassive black hole (i.e. ~10^7 M_sun) of the galaxy.
  • We report on GROND observations of a 40 sec duration (rest-frame) optical flare from GRB 080129 at redshift 4.349. The rise- and decay time follow a power law with indices +12 and -8, respectively, inconsistent with a reverse shock and a factor 10$^5$ faster than variability caused by ISM interaction. While optical flares have been seen in the past (e.g. GRB 990123, 041219B, 060111B and 080319B), for the first time, our observations not only resolve the optical flare into sub-components, but also provide a spectral energy distribution from the optical to the near-infrared once every minute. The delay of the flare relative to the GRB, its spectral energy distribution as well as the ratio of pulse widths suggest it to arise from residual collisions in GRB outflows \cite{liw08}.If this interpretation is correct and can be supported by more detailed modelling or observation in further GRBs, the delay measurement provides an independent, determination of the Lorentz factor of the outflow.
  • We report on the detection by Swift of GRB 080913, and subsequent optical/near-infrared follow-up observations by GROND which led to the discovery of its optical/NIR afterglow and the recognition of its high-z nature via the detection of a spectral break between the i' and z' bands. Spectroscopy obtained at the ESO-VLT revealed a continuum extending down to lambda = 9400 A, and zero flux for 7500 A < lambda<9400 A, which we interpret as the onset of a Gunn-Peterson trough at z=6.695+-0.025 (95.5% conf. level), making GRB 080913 the highest redshift GRB to date, and more distant than the highest-redshift QSO. We note that many redshift indicators which are based on promptly available burst or afterglow properties have failed for GRB 080913. We report on our follow-up campaign and compare the properties of GRB 080913 with bursts at lower redshift. In particular, since the afterglow of this burst is fainter than typical for GRBs, we show that 2m-class telescopes can identify most high-redshift GRBs.
  • Aims: The AGILE gamma-ray burst GRB 080514B is the first burst with detected emission above 30 MeV and an optical afterglow. However, no spectroscopic redshift for this burst is known. Methods: We compiled ground-based photometric optical/NIR and millimeter data from several observatories, including the multi-channel imager GROND, as well as ultraviolet \swift UVOT and X-ray XRT observations. The spectral energy distribution of the optical/NIR afterglow shows a sharp drop in the \swift UVOT UV filters that can be utilized for the estimation of a redshift. Results: Fitting the SED from the \swift UVOT $uvw2$ band to the $H$ band, we estimate a photometric redshift of $z=1.8^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$, consistent with the pseudo redshift reported by Pelangeon & Atteia (2008) based on the gamma-ray data. Conclusions: The afterglow properties of GRB 080514B do not differ from those exhibited by the global sample of long bursts, supporting the view that afterglow properties are basically independent of prompt emission properties.
  • We present optical and near-infrared photometry of the afterglow of the long Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 070802 at redshift 2.45 obtained with the ESO/MPI 2.2 m telescope equipped with the multi-channel imager GROND. Follow-up observations in g'r'i'z' and JHK_S bands started ~17 min and extended up to 28 h post burst. We find an increase in brightness of the afterglow at early times, which can be explained by the superposition of reverse and forward shock (FS) emission or the onset of the afterglow FS. Additionally, we detect a strong broad-band absorption feature in the i' band, which we interpret as extinction from the redshifted 2175 A bump in the GRB host galaxy. This is one of the first and clearest detections of the 2175 A feature at high redshift. It is strong evidence for a carbon rich environment, indicating that Milky Way or Large Magellanic Cloud like dust was already formed in substantial amounts in a galaxy at z=2.45.
  • We present and discuss the results of an extensive observational campaign devoted to GRB071010A, a long-duration gamma-ray burst detected by the Swift satellite. This event was followed for almost a month in the optical/near-infrared (NIR) with various telescopes starting from about 2min after the high-energy event. Swift-XRT observations started only later at about 0.4d. The light-curve evolution allows us to single out an initial rising phase with a maximum at about 7min, possibly the afterglow onset in the context of the standard fireball model, which is then followed by a smooth decay interrupted by a sharp rebrightening at about 0.6d. The rebrightening was visible in both the optical/NIR and X-rays and can be interpreted as an episode of discrete energy injection, although various alternatives are possible. A steepening of the afterglow light curve is recorded at about 1d. The entire evolution of the optical/NIR afterglow is consistent with being achromatic. This could be one of the few identified GRB afterglows with an achromatic break in the X-ray through the optical/NIR bands. Polarimetry was also obtained at about 1d, just after the rebrightening and almost coincident with the steepening. This provided a fairly tight upper limit of 0.9% for the polarized-flux fraction.
  • We describe the construction of GROND, a 7-channel imager, primarily designed for rapid observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows. It allows simultaneous imaging in the Sloan g'r'i'z' and near-infrared $JHK$ bands. GROND was commissioned at the MPI/ESO 2.2m telescope at La Silla (Chile) in April 2007, and first results of its performance and calibration are presented.