• We present the first study of the evolution of the galaxy luminosity and stellar-mass functions (GLF and GSMF) carried out by the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe the COMMODORE galaxy catalogue selected from Science Verification images. This catalogue is made of $\sim 4\times 10^{6}$ galaxies at $0<z\lesssim1.3$ over a sky area of $\sim155\ {\rm sq. \ deg}$ with ${\it i}$-band limiting magnitude ${\it i}=23\ {\rm mag}$. Such characteristics are unprecedented for galaxy catalogues and they enable us to study the evolution of GLF and GSMF at $0<z<1$ homogeneously with the same statistically-rich data-set and free of cosmic variance effects. The aim of this study is twofold: i) we want to test our method based on the use of photometric-redshift probability density functions against literature results obtained with spectroscopic redshifts; ii) we want to shed light on the way galaxies build up their masses over cosmic time. We find that both the ${\it i}$-band galaxy luminosity and stellar mass functions are characterised by a double-Schechter shape at $z<0.2$. Both functions agree well with those based on spectroscopic redshifts. The DES GSMF agrees especially with those measured for the GAlaxy Mass Assembly and the PRism MUlti-object Survey out to $z\sim1$. At $0.2<z<1$, we find the ${\it i}$-band luminosity and stellar-mass densities respectively to be constant ($\rho_{\rm L}\propto (1+z)^{-0.12\pm0.11}$) and decreasing ($\rho_{\rm Mstar}\propto (1+z)^{-0.5\pm0.1}$) with $z$. This indicates that, while at higher redshift galaxies have less stellar mass, their luminosities do not change substantially because of their younger and brighter stellar populations. Finally, we also find evidence for a top-down mass-dependent evolution of the GSMF.
  • Valleytronics targets the exploitation of the additional degrees of freedom in materials where the energy of the carriers may assume several equal minimum values (valleys) at non-equivalent points of the reciprocal space. In single layers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) the lack of inversion symmetry, combined with a large spin-orbit interaction, leads to a conduction (valence) band with different spin-polarized minima (maxima) having equal energies. This offers the opportunity to manipulate information at the level of the charge (electrons or holes), spin (up or down) and crystal momentum (valley). Any implementation of these concepts, however, needs to consider the robustness of such degrees of freedom, which are deeply intertwined. Here we address the spin and valley relaxation dynamics of both electrons and holes with a combination of ultrafast optical spectroscopy techniques, and determine the individual characteristic relaxation times of charge, spin and valley in a MoS$_{2}$ monolayer. These results lay the foundations for understanding the mechanisms of spin and valley polarization loss in two-dimensional TMDs: spin/valley polarizations survive almost two-orders of magnitude longer for holes, where spin and valley dynamics are interlocked, than for electrons, where these degrees of freedom are decoupled. This may lead to novel approaches for the integration of materials with large spin-orbit in robust spintronic/valleytronic platforms.
  • Project GRAND, a proportional wire chamber array, is used to examine the decreased counting rate of ground level muons during the Forbush decrease event of September 11, 2005. Data are presented and compared to that of other cosmic ray monitors. A directional study of the Forbush decrease was undertaken and precursor anisotropies to this geomagnetic storm were studied utilizing GRAND's angular resolution.
  • GRAND is an array of position sensitive proportional wire chambers (PWCs) located at 86.2 degrees W, 41.7 degrees N at an elevation of 220 m adjacent to the campus of the University of Notre Dame with 82 square meters of total muon detector area. The geometry of the PWCs allows the angles of the charged secondary muon tracks to be measured to +/- 0.3 deg in each of two orthogonal planes. Muons are 99% differentiated from electrons by means of a 51 mm steel plate in each detector.
  • On October 28, 2003 an earthward-directed coronal mass ejection (CME) was observed from SOHO/LASCO imagery in conjunction with an X17 solar flare. The CME, traveling at nearly 2000 km/s, impacted the Earth on October 29, 2003 causing ground-based particle detectors to register a counting rate drop known as a Forbush decrease. In addition to affecting the rate of cosmic rays, the CME was also responsible for causing anisotropies in the direction of incidence. Data from Project GRAND, an array of proportional wire chambers, are presented during the time of this Forbush decrease. A simple model for CME propagation is proposed and we present an argument based on gyroradius that shows that a magnetic field of the radius calculated for the ejecta is sufficient to deflect energetic charged particles of an energy detectable by GRAND.
  • Project GRAND, a proportional wire chamber array, is used to examine the increased counting rate of single muons during the solar Ground Level Event (GLE) of April 15, 2001. Data are presented and compared to our background rates and to that of neutron monitor stations. This GLE is seen with a statistical significance of 6.1 sigma.
  • Project GRAND is a 100m x 100m air shower array of proportional wire chambers (PWCs). There are 64 stations each with eight 1.29 m^2 PWC planes arranged in four orthogonal pairs placed vertically above one another to geometrically measure the angles of charged secondaries. A steel plate above the bottom pair of PWCs differentiates muons (which pass undeflected through the steel) from non-penetrating particles. FLUKA Monte Carlo studies show that a TeV gamma ray striking the atmosphere at normal incidence produces 0.23 muons which reach ground level where their angles and identities are measured. Thus, paradoxically, secondary muons are used as a signature for gamma ray primaries. The data are examined for possible angular and time coincidences with eight gamma ray bursts (GRBs) detected by BATSE. Seven of the GRBs were selected because of their good acceptance by GRAND and high BATSE Fluence. The eighth GRB was added due to its possible coincident detection by Milagrito. For each of the eight candidate GRBs, the number of excess counts during the BATSE T90 time interval and within plus or minus five degrees of BATSE's direction was obtained. The highest statistical significance reported in this paper (2.7 sigma) is for the event that was predicted to be the most likely to be observed (GRB 971110).
  • Project GRAND is a 100m x 100m air shower array of position sensitive proportional wire chambers (PWCs) located at 41.7 degrees North and 86.2 degrees West at an elevation of 220m above sea level. Its convenient location adjacent to the campus of the University of Notre Dame makes it a good training ground for students. There are 64 stations each with eight 1.29 m^2 PWCs. The geometry of the stations allows for the angles of charged secondaries to be determined to within 0.26 degrees in each of two orthogonal planes; muons are differentiated from electrons and hadrons by means of a steel plate. Two triggers are run simultaneously: a multiple hit coincidence trigger, rich in extensive air showers, and a single track trigger, rich in secondary muon tracks. The former trigger is sensitive to primary energies greater than ~100 TeV, the latter to energies greater than ~10 GeV.
  • We report on a study of sub-TeV ($E_\gamma > 10$ GeV) gamma-ray-induced muon secondaries in coincidence with BATSE gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Each TeV gamma ray striking the atmosphere produces $\approx$0.2 muons whose identity and angle can be measured by the Project GRAND array. Eight GRB candidates were studied; seven were selected based upon the optimum product of (detected BATSE fluence) $\times$ (GRAND's acceptance). One candidate was added because it was reported as a detection by the Milagrito collaboration. Seven candidates show a positive, though not statistically significant, muon excess. The most significant possible coincidence shows an excess of $466 \pm 171$ muons during the BATSE T90 time interval. It is also of interest that the event with the second most significant signal to noise (1.2$\sigma$) is the Milagrito event. If our most significant event is real, the implied fluence of energetic ($> 10$ GeV) gammas necessary to account for the observed muon excess would require that most of the GRB fluence arrived in the form of energetic gammas.
  • The counting rate of single muon tracks from the Project GRAND proportional wire chamber array is examined during the Ground Level Event (GLE) of April 15, 2001. The GLE was seen by neutron monitor stations shortly after the time of the solar X-ray flare. GRAND's single muon data are presented and compared with neutron monitor data from Climax, Newark, and Oulu. The single muon data have mean primary hadron energies higher than those of these neutron monitor stations and so contain information about higher energy hadrons. For the single muon data for Project GRAND, the GLE is detected at a statistical significance of 6.1-sigma.
  • Project GRAND observes small variations in the number of incident muons when plotted versus local solar time. The total accumulated number of muons by GRAND over four years' time is ~140 billion. The data obtained by Project GRAND are compared with data from neutron monitor stations at Climax and at Newark which detect secondary neutrons. Project GRAND is an array of 64 proportional wire chamber stations which are sensitive to secondary muons at energies greater than 0.1 GeV. The mean energy of cosmic ray primaries which produce these muons depends on the spectral index. For a differential spectral index of 2.4, the most probable gamma ray primary energy is about 10 GeV, the response falling steeply below this energy and slowly above this energy; this most probably energy varies only slowly with spectral index.
  • The Ground-Level Event (GLE) associated with the X5.7 solar flare of July 14, 2000 is studied by the Project GRAND proportional wire chamber array. Results are compared to those obtained by the Climax Neutron Monitor experiment which detects secondary neutrons. The Climax monitor, located in Climax, Colorado, is operated by the University of Chicago. The time of the GLE signal of the Climax station is examined for a possible coincident signal in the data of Project GRAND. Project GRAND is an array of 64 proportional wire chamber stations. The stations are sensitive to secondary muons with energies greater than 0.1 GeV. The mean energy of primaries which produce these ground level muons depends on the spectral index of the primary spectrum. For a differential spectral index of 2.4, the most probable primary energy is 10 GeV falling rapidly below this energy and falling slowly above this energy.
  • Project GRAND is an extensive air shower array of proportional wire chambers. It has 64 stations in a 100m x 100m area; each station has eight planes of proportional wire chambers with a 50 mm steel absorber plate above the bottom two planes. This arrangement of planes, each 1.25 square meters of area, allow an angular measurement for each track to 0.25 degrees in each of two projections. The steel absorber plate allows a measurement of the identity of each muon track to 96% accuracy. Two data-taking triggers allow data to be simultaneously taken for a) extensive air showers (multiple coincidence station hits) at about 1 Hz and b) single muons (single tracks of identified muons) at 2000 Hz. Eight on-line computers pre-analyze the single track data and store the results on magnetic tape in compacted form with a minimum of computer dead-time. One additional computer reads data from the shower triggers and records this raw data on a separate magnetic tape with no pre-analysis.
  • Project GRAND is an array of proportional wire chambers composed of 64 stations with each station containing eight proportional wire planes and a 50 mm steel plate. The proportional wire planes together with the steel absorber allow a measurement of the angle and identity of single muon tracks. Of the two data-taking triggers, one is for single tracks. Since the rate of single muon tracks at sea level above the muon energy threshold of the experiment (0.1 GeV) is substantial, good statistics are available by accumulating several years of data. A map in sidereal right ascension and declination is obtained as well as one in a sun-centered coordinate system in order to study the sidereal and solar effects separately.
  • Project GRAND has the capability of measuring the angle and identity of single tracks of secondary muons at ground level. The array is comprised of 64 stations each containing eight proportional wire planes with a 50 mm steel absorber plate placed above the bottom two planes in each station. The added steel absorber plate allows muon tracks to be separated from the less massive electrons. Over 100 billion identified muon angles have been measured. With the high statistics available, it is possible to obtain muon angular asymmetries with low systematics by subtracting west from east (and separately, south from north) angles; the subtraction eliminates most of the systematic errors while still retaining adequately small statistical errors on the differences. A preliminary analysis is performed as a function of solar time to obtain the effects on the muon rate due to effects of the sun.