• Hollow channel plasma wakefield acceleration is a proposed method to provide high acceleration gradients for electrons and positrons alike: a key to future lepton colliders. However, beams which are misaligned from the channel axis induce strong transverse wakefields, deflecting beams and reducing the collider luminosity. This undesirable consequence sets a tight constraint on the alignment accuracy of the beam propagating through the channel. Direct measurements of beam misalignment-induced transverse wakefields are therefore essential for designing mitigation strategies. We present the first quantitative measurements of transverse wakefields in a hollow plasma channel, induced by an off-axis 20 GeV positron bunch, and measured with another 20 GeV lower charge trailing positron probe bunch. The measurements are largely consistent with theory.
  • Ionization injection in a plasma wakefield accelerator was investigated experimentally using two lithium plasma sources of different lengths. The ionization of the helium gas, used to confine the lithium, injects electrons in the wake. After acceleration, these injected electrons were observed as a distinct group from the drive beam on the energy spectrometer. They typically have a charge of tens of pC, an energy spread of a few GeV, and a maximum energy of up to 30 GeV. The emittance of this group of electrons can be many times smaller than the initial emittance of the drive beam. The energy scaling for the trapped charge from one plasma length to the other is consistent with the blowout theory of the plasma wakefield.
  • Collimator wakefields in the Beam Delivery System (BDS) of future linear colliders, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), can be an important source of emittance growth and beam jitter amplification, consequently degrading the luminosity. Therefore, a better understanding of collimator wakefield effects is essential to optimise the collimation systems of future linear colliders in order to minimise wakefield effects. In the past, measurements of single-bunch collimator wakefields have been carried out at SLAC with the aim of benchmarking theory, numerical calculations and experiments. Those studies revealed some discrepancies between the measurements and the theoretical models. New experimental tests using available beam test facilities, such as the End Station A Test Beam (ESTB) at SLAC, would help to improve our understanding on collimator wakefields. ESTB will provide the perfect test bed to investigate collimator wakefields for different bunch length conditions, relevant for both ILC (300 micrometers nominal bunch length) and CLIC (44 micrometers nominal bunch length) studies. Here we propose to perform new experimental tests of collimator wakefield effects on electron/positron beams at SLAC ESTB.