• A long-standing paradigm in astrophysics is that collisions- or mergers- of two neutron stars (NSs) form highly relativistic and collimated outflows (jets) powering gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) of short (< 2 s) duration. However, the observational support for this model is only indirect. A hitherto outstanding prediction is that gravitational wave (GW) events from such mergers should be associated with GRBs, and that a majority of these GRBs should be off-axis, that is, they should point away from the Earth. Here we report the discovery of the X-ray counterpart associated with the GW event GW170817. While the electromagnetic counterpart at optical and infrared frequencies is dominated by the radioactive glow from freshly synthesized r-process material in the merger ejecta, known as kilonova, observations at X-ray and, later, radio frequencies exhibit the behavior of a short GRB viewed off-axis. Our detection of X-ray emission at a location coincident with the kilonova transient provides the missing observational link between short GRBs and GWs from NS mergers, and gives independent confirmation of the collimated nature of the GRB emission.
  • We report the discovery and monitoring of the near-infrared counterpart (AT2017gfo) of a binary neutron-star merger event detected as a gravitational wave source by Advanced LIGO/Virgo (GW170817) and as a short gamma-ray burst by Fermi/GBM and Integral/SPI-ACS (GRB170817A). The evolution of the transient light is consistent with predictions for the behaviour of a "kilonova/macronova", powered by the radioactive decay of massive neutron-rich nuclides created via r-process nucleosynthesis in the neutron-star ejecta. In particular, evidence for this scenario is found from broad features seen in Hubble Space Telescope infrared spectroscopy, similar to those predicted for lanthanide dominated ejecta, and the much slower evolution in the near-infrared Ks-band compared to the optical. This indicates that the late-time light is dominated by high-opacity lanthanide-rich ejecta, suggesting nucleosynthesis to the 3rd r-process peak (atomic masses A~195). This discovery confirms that neutron-star mergers produce kilo-/macronovae and that they are at least a major - if not the dominant - site of rapid neutron capture nucleosynthesis in the universe.
  • Modelling the base of the solar convective envelope is a tedious problem. Since the first rotation inversions, solar modellers are confronted with the fact that a region of very limited extent has an enormous physical impact on the Sun. Indeed, it is the transition region from differential to solid body rotation, the tachocline, which furthermore is influenced by turbulence and is also supposed to be the seat of the solar magnetic dynamo. Moreover, solar models show significant disagreement with the sound speed profile in this region. In this paper, we show how helioseismology can provide further constraints on this region by carrying out an inversion of the Ledoux discriminant. We compare these inversions for Standard Solar Models built using various opacity tables and chemical abundances and discuss the origins of the discrepancies between Solar Models and the Sun.
  • The Sun is the most constrained and well-studied of all stars. As a consequence, the physical ingredients entering solar models are used as a reference to study all other stars observed in the Universe. However, our understanding of the solar structure is still imperfect, as illustrated by the current debate on the heavy element abundances in the Sun. We wish to provide additional information on the solar structure by carrying out structural inversions of a new physical quantity, a proxy of the entropy of the solar plasma which properties are very sensitive to the temperature gradient below the convective zone. We use new structural kernels to carry out direct inversions of an entropy proxy of the solar plasma and compare the solar structure to various standard solar models built using various opacity tables and chemical abundances. We also link our results to classical tests commonly found in the literature. Our analysis allows us to probe more efficiently the uncertain regions of the solar models, just below the convective zone, paving the way for new in-depth analyses of the Sun taking into account additional physical uncertainties of solar models beyond the specific question of chemical abundances.
  • We present a review of two methods used to model recent LCLS experimental results for the 3C/3D line intensity ratio of Fe XVII (Bernitt et al. 2012), the time-dependent collisional-radiative method and the density-matrix approach. These are described and applied to a two-level atomic system excited by an X-ray free electron laser. A range of pulse parameters is explored and the effects on the predicted Fe XVII 3C and 3D line intensity ratio are calculated. In order to investigate the behavior of the predicted line intensity ratio, a particular pair of A-values for the 3C and 3D transitions was chosen (2.22 $\times$ 10$^{13}$ s$^{-1}$ and 6.02 $\times$ 10$^{12}$ s$^{-1}$ for the 3C and 3D, respectively), but our conclusions are independent of the precise values. We also reaffirm the conclusions from Oreshkina et al.(2014, 2015): the non-linear effects in the density matrix are important and the reduction in the Fe XVII 3C/3D line intensity ratio is sensitive to the laser pulse parameters, namely pulse duration, pulse intensity, and laser bandwidth. It is also shown that for both models the lowering of the 3C/3D line intensity ratio below the expected time-independent oscillator strength ratio has a significant contribution due to the emission from the plasma after the laser pulse has left the plasma volume. Laser intensities above $\sim 1\times 10^{12}$ W/cm$^{2}$ are required for a reduction in the 3C/3D line intensity ratio below the expected time independent oscillator strength ratio.
  • The analysis of the BRITE oscillation spectrum of the main sequence early B-type star $\nu$ Eridani is presented. Only models with the modified mean opacity profile can account for the observed frequency ranges as well as for the values of some individual frequencies. The number of the $\kappa$ modified seismic models is constrained by the nonadiabatic parameter $f$, which is very sensitive to the opacity changes in the subphotospheric layers where the pulsations are driven. We present an example of the model that satisfies all the above conditions. It seems that the OPLIB opacities are preferred over those from the OPAL and OP projects. Moreover, we discuss additional consequences of the opacity modification, namely, an enhancement of the efficiency of convection in the Z-bump as well as an occurrence of close radial modes which is a kind of avoided-crossing phenomenon common for nonradial modes in standard main sequence models.
  • Recent R-matrix calculations claim to produce a significant enhancement in the opacity of Fe XVII due to atomic core excitations [S. N. Nahar & A.K. Pradhan, Phys. Rev. Letters 116, 235003 (2016), arXiv:1606.02731] and assert that this enhancement is consistent with recent measurements of higher-than-predicted iron opacities [J. E. Bailey et al., Nature 517, 56 (2015)]. This comment shows that the standard opacity models which have already been directly compared with experimental data produce photon absorption cross-sections for Fe XVII that are effectively equivalent to (and in fact larger than) the new R-matrix opacities. Thus, the new R-matrix results cannot be expected to significantly impact the existing discrepancies between theory and experiment because they produce neither a "large enhancement" nor account for "missing continuum plasma opacity" relative to standard models.
  • We present a new, publicly available, set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation-of-state (EOS) model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations that we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.
  • New, more detailed calculations of the emission spectra of the He-like K ALPHA complex of calcium, iron and nickel have been carried out using data from both distorted-wave and R-matrix calculations. The value of the GD ratio (an extended definition of the G ratio that accounts for the effect of resolved and unresolved satellite lines) is significantly enhanced at temperatures below the temperature of He-like maximum abundance. Furthermore it is shown that satellite lines are important contributors to the GD ratio such that GD/G>1 at temperatures well above the temperature of maximum abundance. These new calculations demonstrate, with an improved treatment of the KLn (n>=3) satellite lines, that K ALPHA satellite lines need to be included in models of He like spectra even at relatively high temperatures. The excellent agreement between spectra and line ratios calculated from R-matrix and distorted-wave data also confirms the validity of models based on distorted-wave data for highly charged systems, provided the effect of resonances are taken into account as independent processes.
  • It is shown that above the temperature of maximum abundance, recombination rates into the excited states of He-like ions that are calculated using earlier, more approximate methods differ markedly from rates obtained from recent distorted-wave and R-Matrix calculations (unified recombination rate coefficients) for Ca, Fe, and Ni. The present rates lead to G ratios that are greatly lower than those resulting from the more approximate rates in previous works, by up to a factor of six at high electron temperatures. Excellent agreement between the distorted-wave and the R-Matrix rates, as well as excellent agreement in the G ratios calculated from them, provides support for the accuracy of these new values which have a broad applicability to the modelling and interpreting of X-ray spectra from a variety of astrophysical and laboratory sources.