• Electron scattering and dielectronic recombination with an ion in the presence of a neighboring atom is studied. The incident electron is assumed to be captured by the ion, leading to resonant excitation of the atom which afterwards may stabilize either by electron re-emission or radiative decay. We show that the participation of the atom can strongly affect, both quantitatively and qualitatively, the corresponding processes of electron scattering and recombination. Various ion-atom systems and electronic transitions are considered. In particular we show that electron scattering under backward angles may be strongly enhanced and derive the scaling behavior of two-center dielectronic recombination with the principal quantum numbers of the participating atomic states.
  • PKS 1718$-$649 is one of the closest and most comprehensively studied candidates of a young active galactic nucleus (AGN) that is still embedded in its optical host galaxy. The compact radio structure, with a maximal extent of a few parsecs, makes it a member of the group of compact symmetric objects (CSO). Its environment imposes a turnover of the radio synchrotron spectrum towards lower frequencies, also classifying PKS 1718$-$649 as gigahertz-peaked radio spectrum (GPS) source. Its close proximity has allowed the first detection of extended X-ray emission in a GPS/CSO source with Chandra that is for the most part unrelated to nuclear feedback. However, not much is known about the nature of this emission. By co-adding all archival Chandra data and complementing these datasets with the large effective area of XMM-Newton, we are able to study the detailed physics of the environment of PKS 1718$-$649. Not only can we confirm that the bulk of the $\lesssim$kiloparsec-scale environment emits in the soft X-rays, but we also identify the emitting gas to form a hot, collisionally ionized medium. While the feedback of the central AGN still seems to be constrained to the inner few parsecs, we argue that supernovae are capable of producing the observed large-scale X-ray emission at a rate inferred from its estimated star formation rate.
  • Due to its superior coherent and optical properties at room temperature, the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has become a promising quantum probe for nanoscale quantum sensing. However, the application of NV containing nanodiamonds to quantum sensing suffers from their relatively poor spin coherence times. Here we demonstrate energy efficient protection of NV spin coherence in nanodiamonds using concatenated continuous dynamical decoupling, which exhibits excellent performance with less stringent microwave power requirement. When applied to nanodiamonds in living cells we are able to extend the spin coherence time by an order of magnitude to the $T_1$-limit of up to $30\mu$s. Further analysis demonstrates concomitant improvements of sensing performance which shows that our results provide an important step towards in vivo quantum sensing using NV centers in nanodiamond.
  • PMN J1603$-$4904 is a likely member of the rare class of $\gamma$-ray emitting young radio galaxies. Only one other source, PKS 1718$-$649, has been confirmed so far. These objects, which may transition into larger radio galaxies, are a stepping stone to understanding AGN evolution. It is not completely clear how these young galaxies, seen edge-on, can produce high-energy $\gamma$-rays. PMN J1603$-$4904 has been detected by TANAMI Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations and has been followed-up with multiwavelength observations. A Fermi/LAT $\gamma$-ray source has been associated with it in the LAT catalogs. We have obtained Chandra observations of the source in order to consider the possibility of source confusion, due to the relatively large positional uncertainty of Fermi/LAT. The goal was to investigate the possibility of other X-ray bright sources in the vicinity of PMN J1603$-$4904 that could be counterparts to the $\gamma$-ray emission. With Chandra/ACIS, we find no other sources in the uncertainty ellipse of Fermi/LAT data, which includes an improved localization analysis of 8 years of data. We further study the X-ray fluxes and spectra. We conclude that PMN J1603$-$4904 is indeed the second confirmed $\gamma$-ray bright young radio galaxy.
  • TANAMI is a multiwavelength program monitoring active galactic nuclei (AGN) south of -30deg declination including high-resolution Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) imaging, radio, optical/UV, X-ray and gamma-ray studies. We have previously published first-epoch 8.4GHz VLBI images of the parsec-scale structure of the initial sample. In this paper, we present images of 39 additional sources. The full sample comprises most of the radio- and gamma-ray brightest AGN in the southern quarter of the sky, overlapping with the region from which high-energy (>100TeV) neutrino events have been found. We characterize the parsec-scale radio properties of the jets and compare with the quasi-simultaneous Fermi/LAT gamma-ray data. Furthermore, we study the jet properties of sources which are in positional coincidence with high-energy neutrino events as compared to the full sample. We test the positional agreement of high-energy neutrino events with various AGN samples. Our observations yield the first images of many jets below -30deg declination at milliarcsecond resolution. We find that gamma-ray loud TANAMI sources tend to be more compact on parsec-scales and have higher core brightness temperatures than gamma-ray faint jets, indicating higher Doppler factors. No significant structural difference is found between sources in positional coincidence with high-energy neutrino events and other TANAMI jets. The 22 gamma-ray brightest AGN in the TANAMI sky show only a weak positional agreement with high-energy neutrinos demonstrating that the >100TeV IceCube signal is not simply dominated by a small number of the $\gamma$-ray brightest blazars. Instead, a larger number of sources have to contribute to the signal with each individual source having only a small Poisson probability for producing an event in multi-year integrations of current neutrino detectors.
  • Efficient polarization of organic molecules is of extraordinary relevance when performing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and imaging. Commercially available routes to dynamical nuclear polarization (DNP) work at extremely low-temperatures, thus bringing the molecules out of their ambient thermal conditions and relying on the solidification of organic samples. In this work we investigate polarization transfer from optically-pumped nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond to external molecules at room temperature. This polarization transfer is described by both an extensive analytical analysis and numerical simulations based on spin bath bosonization and is supported by experimental data in excellent agreement. These results set the route to hyperpolarization of diffusive molecules in different scenarios and consequently, due to increased signal, to high-resolution NMR.
  • Einstein's General Theory of Relativity (GR) successfully describes gravity. The most fundamental predictions of GR are black holes (BHs), but in spite of many convincing BH candidates in the Universe, there is no conclusive experimental proof of their existence using astronomical observations in the electromagnetic spectrum. Are BHs real astrophysical objects? Does GR hold in its most extreme limit or are alternatives needed? The prime target to address these fundamental questions is in the center of our own Galaxy, which hosts the closest and best-constrained supermassive BH candidate in the Universe, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). Three different types of experiments hold the promise to test GR in a strong-field regime using observations of Sgr A* with new-generation instruments. The first experiment aims to image the relativistic plasma emission which surrounds the event horizon and forms a "shadow" cast against the background, whose predicted size (~50 microarcseconds) can now be resolved by upcoming VLBI experiments at mm-waves such as the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). The second experiment aims to monitor stars orbiting Sgr A* with the upcoming near-infrared interferometer GRAVITY at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The third experiment aims to time a radio pulsar in tight orbit about Sgr A* using radio telescopes (including the Atacama Large Millimeter Array or ALMA). The BlackHoleCam project exploits the synergy between these three different techniques and aims to measure the main BH parameters with sufficient precision to provide fundamental tests of GR and probe the spacetime around a BH in any metric theory of gravity. Here, we review our current knowledge of the physical properties of Sgr A* as well as the current status of such experimental efforts towards imaging the event horizon, measuring stellar orbits, and timing pulsars around Sgr A*.
  • We report results of a magnetic characterization of [Cu$_{30}$Ni$_{70}$(6nm)]$_{20}$ (x=1-7nm) superlattices using Polarized Neutron Reflectometry (PNR) and SQUID magnetometry. The study has shown that the magnetic moment of the structures growths almost linearly from H = 0 to H$_{sat}$ = 1.3kOe which is an indirect evidence of antiferromagnetic (AF) coupling of the magnetic moments in neighbouring layers. PNR, however, did not detect any in-plane AF coupling. Taking into account the out-of-plane easy axis of the Cu$_{30}$Ni$_{70}$ layers, this may mean that only the out-of-plane component of the magnetic moments are AF coupled.
  • Context. The majority of bright extragalactic gamma-ray sources are blazars. Only a few radio galaxies have been detected by Fermi/LAT. Recently, the GHz-peaked spectrum source PKS 1718-649 was confirmed to be gamma-ray bright, providing further evidence for the existence of a population of gamma-ray loud, compact radio galaxies. A spectral turnover in the radio spectrum in the MHz to GHz range is a characteristic feature of these objects, which are thought to be young due to their small linear sizes. The multiwavelength properties of the gamma-ray source PMN J1603-4904 suggest that it is a member of this source class. Aims. The known radio spectrum of PMN J1603-4904 can be described by a power law above 1 GHz. Using observations from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 150, 325, and 610 MHz, we investigate the behaviour of the spectrum at lower frequencies to search for a low-frequency turnover. Methods. Data from the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS ADR) catalogue and archival GMRT observations were used to construct the first MHz to GHz spectrum of PMN J1603-4904. Results. We detect a low-frequency turnover of the spectrum and measure the peak position at about 490 MHz (rest-frame), which, using the known relation of peak frequency and linear size, translates into a maximum linear source size of ~1.4 kpc. Conclusions. The detection of the MHz peak indicates that PMN J1603-4904 is part of this population of radio galaxies with turnover frequencies in the MHz to GHz regime. Therefore it can be considered the second, confirmed object of this kind detected in gamma-rays. Establishing this gamma-ray source class will help to investigate the gamma-ray production sites and to test broadband emission models.
  • Manipulation of magnetization with ultrashort laser pulses is promising for information storage device applications. The dynamic of the magnetization response depends on the energy transfer from the photons to the spins during the initial laser excitation. A material of special interest for magnetic storage is FePt nanoparticles , on which optical writing with optical angular momentum was demonstrated recently by Lambert et al., although the mechanism remained unclear. Here we investigate experimentally and theoretically the all-optical switching of FePt nanoparticles. We show that the magnetization switching is a stochastic process. We develop a complete multiscale model which allows us to optimize the number of laser shots needed to write the magnetization of high anisotropy FePt nanoparticles in our experiments. We conclude that only angular momentum induced optically by the inverse Faraday effect will provide switching with one single femtosecond laser pulse.
  • Supermassive black holes (SMBH) are essential for the production of jets in radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN). Theoretical models based on Blandford & Znajek extract the rotational energy from a Kerr black hole, which could be the case for NGC1052, to launch these jets. This requires magnetic fields of the order of $10^3\,$G to $10^4\,$G. We imaged the vicinity of the SMBH of the AGN NGC1052 with the Global Millimetre VLBI Array and found a bright and compact central feature, smaller than 1.9 light days (100 Schwarzschild radii) in radius. Interpreting this as a blend of the unresolved jet bases, we derive the magnetic field at 1 Schwarzschild radius to lie between 200 G and ~80000 G consistent with Blandford & Znajek models.
  • Production of electron-positron pairs in the collision of a high-energy photon with a high-intensity few-cycle laser pulse is studied. By utilizing the frameworks of laser-dressed spinor and scalar quantum electrodynamics, a comparison between the production of pairs of Dirac and Klein-Gordon particles is drawn. Positron energy spectra and angular distributions are presented for various laser parameters. We identify conditions under which predictions from Klein-Gordon theory either closely resemble or largely differ from those of the proper Dirac theory. In particular, we address the question to which extent the relevance of spin effects is influenced by the short duration of the laser pulse.
  • We investigated the upper critical magnetic field, $H_{c}$, of a superconductor-ferromagnet (S/F) bilayer of Nb/Cu$_{41}$Ni$_{59}$ and a Nb film (as reference). We obtained the dependence of $H_{c\perp}$ and $H_{c\parallel}$ (perpendicular and parallel to the film plane, respectively) on the temperature, $T$, by measurements of the resistive transitions and the dependence on the inclination angle, $\theta$, of the applied field to the film plane, by non-resonant microwave absorption. Over a wide range, $H_{c\perp}$ and $H_{c\parallel}$ show the temperature dependence predicted by the Ginzburg-Landau theory. At low temperatures and close to the critical temperature deviations are observed. While $H_{c}(\theta)$ of the Nb film follows the Tinkham prediction for thin superconducting films, the Nb/Cu$_{41}$Ni$_{59}$-bilayer data exhibit deviations when $\theta$ approaches zero. We attribute this finding to the additional anisotropy induced by the quasi-one-dimensional Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO)-like state and propose a new vortex structure in S/F bilayers, adopting the segmentation approach from high-temperature superconductors.
  • The discovery of extraterrestrial very-high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube collaboration has launched a quest for the identification of their astrophysical sources. Gamma-ray blazars have been predicted to yield a cumulative neutrino signal exceeding the atmospheric background above energies of 100 TeV, assuming that both the neutrinos and the gamma-ray photons are produced by accelerated protons in relativistic jets. Since the background spectrum falls steeply with increasing energy, the individual events with the clearest signature of being of an extraterrestrial origin are those at PeV energies. Inside the large positional-uncertainty fields of the first two PeV neutrinos detected by IceCube, the integrated emission of the blazar population has a sufficiently high electromagnetic flux to explain the detected IceCube events, but fluences of individual objects are too low to make an unambiguous source association. Here, we report that a major outburst of the blazar PKS B1424-418 occurred in temporal and positional coincidence with the third PeV-energy neutrino event (IC35) detected by IceCube. Based on an analysis of the full sample of gamma-ray blazars in the IC35 field and assuming a photo-hadronic emission model, we show that the long-term average gamma-ray emission of blazars as a class is in agreement with both the measured all-sky flux of PeV neutrinos and the spectral slope of the IceCube signal. The outburst of PKS B1424-418 has provided an energy output high enough to explain the observed PeV event, indicative of a direct physical association.
  • Using high-resolution radio imaging with VLBI techniques, the TANAMI program has been observing the parsec-scale radio jets of southern (declination south of -30{\deg}) gamma-ray bright AGN simultaneously with Fermi/LAT monitoring of their gamma-ray emission. We present the radio and gamma-ray properties of the TANAMI sources based on one year of contemporaneous TANAMI and Fermi/LAT data. A large fraction (72%) of the TANAMI sample can be associated with bright gamma-ray sources for this time range. Association rates differ for different optical classes with all BL Lacs, 76% of quasars and just 17% of galaxies detected by the LAT. Upper limits were established on the gamma-ray flux from TANAMI sources not detected by LAT. This analysis led to the identification of three new Fermi sources whose detection was later confirmed. The gamma-ray and radio luminosities are related by $L_\gamma \propto L_r^{0.89+-0.04}$. The brightness temperatures of the radio cores increase with the average gamma-ray luminosity, and the presence of brightness temperatures above the inverse Compton limit implies strong Doppler boosting in those sources. The undetected sources have lower gamma/radio luminosity ratios and lower contemporaneous brightness temperatures. Unless the Fermi/LAT-undetected blazars are strongly gamma-ray-fainter than the Fermi/LAT-detected ones, their gamma-ray luminosity should not be significantly lower than the upper limits calculated here.
  • We observe the quantum Zeno effect -- where the act of measurement slows the rate of quantum state transitions -- in a superconducting qubit using linear circuit quantum electrodynamics readout and a near-quantum-limited following amplifier. Under simultaneous strong measurement and qubit drive, the qubit undergoes a series of quantum jumps between states. These jumps are visible in the experimental measurement record and are analyzed using maximum likelihood estimation to determine qubit transition rates. The observed rates agree with both analytical predictions and numerical simulations. The analysis methods are suitable for processing general noisy random telegraph signals.
  • Gamma-ray detected radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (g-NLS1) galaxies constitute a small but interesting sample of the gamma-ray loud AGN. The radio-loudest g-NLS1 known, PKS 2004-447, is located in the southern hemisphere and is monitored in the radio regime by the multiwavelength monitoring program TANAMI. We aim for the first detailed study of the radio morphology and long-term radio spectral evolution of PKS 2004-447, which are essential to understand the diversity of the radio properties of g-NLS1s. The TANAMI VLBI monitoring program uses the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and telescopes in Antarctica, Chile, New Zealand, and South Africa to monitor the jets of radio-loud active galaxies in the southern hemisphere. Lower resolution radio flux density measurements at multiple radio frequencies over four years of observations were obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The TANAMI VLBI image at 8.4 GHz shows an extended one-sided jet with a dominant compact VLBI core. Its brightness temperature is consistent with equipartition, but it is an order of magnitude below other g-NLS1s with the sample value varying over two orders of magnitude. We find a compact morphology with a projected large-scale size <11 kpc and a persistent steep radio spectrum with moderate flux-density variability. PKS 2004-447 appears to be a unique member of the g-NLS1 sample. It exhibits blazar-like features, such as a flat featureless X-ray spectrum and a core dominated, one-sided parsec-scale jet with indications for relativistic beaming. However, the data also reveal properties atypical for blazars, such as a radio spectrum and large-scale size consistent with Compact-Steep-Spectrum (CSS) objects, which are usually associated with young radio sources. These characteristics are unique among all g-NLS1s and extremely rare among gamma-ray loud AGN.
  • ANTARES Collaboration: S. Adrián-Martínez, A. Albert, M. André, G. Anton, M. Ardid, J.-J. Aubert, B. Baret, J. Barrios, S. Basa, V. Bertin, S. Biagi, C. Bogazzi, R. Bormuth, M. Bou-Cabo, M.C. Bouwhuis, R. Bruijn, J. Brunner, J. Busto, A. Capone, L. Caramete, J. Carr, T. Chiarusi, M. Circella, R. Coniglione, H. Costantini, P. Coyle, A. Creusot, G. De Rosa, I. Dekeyser, A. Deschamps, G. De Bonis, C. Distefano, C. Donzaud, D. Dornic, Q. Dorosti, D. Drouhin, A. Dumas, T. Eberl, A. Enzenhöfer, S. Escoffier, K. Fehn, I. Felis, P. Fermani, F. Folger, L.A. Fusco, S. Galatà, P. Gay, S. Geißelsöder, K. Geyer, V. Giordano, A. Gleixner, J.P. Gómez-González, R. Gracia-Ruiz, K. Graf, G. Guillard, H. van Haren, A.J. Heijboer, Y. Hello, J.J. Hernández-Rey, A. Herrero, J. Hößl, J. Hofestädt, C. Hugon, C.W James, M. de Jong, O. Kalekin, U. Katz, D. Kießling, P. Kooijman, A. Kouchner, V. Kulikovskiy, R. Lahmann, D. Lefèvre, E. Leonora, H. Loehner, S. Loucatos, S. Mangano, M. Marcelin, A. Margiotta, J.A. Martínez-Mora, S. Martini, A. Mathieu, T. Michael, P. Migliozzi, M. Neff, E. Nezri, D. Palioselitis, G.E. Păvălaş, C. Pellegrino, C. Perrina, P. Piattelli, V. Popa, T. Pradier, C. Racca, G. Riccobene, R. Richter, K. Roensch, A. Rostovtsev, M. Saldaña, D. F. E. Samtleben, A. Sánchez-Losa, M. Sanguineti, P. Sapienza, J. Schmid, J. Schnabel, S. Schulte, F. Schüssler, T. Seitz, C. Sieger, A. Spies, M. Spurio, J.J.M. Steijger, Th. Stolarczyk, M. Taiuti, C. Tamburini, Y. Tayalati, A. Trovato, M. Tselengidou, C. Tönnis, B. Vallage, C. Vallée, V. Van Elewyck, E. Visser, D. Vivolo, S. Wagner, E. de Wolf, H. Yepes, J.D. Zornoza, J. Zúñiga, TANAMI Collaboration: F. Krauß, M. Kadler, K. Mannheim, R. Schulz, J. Trüstedt, J. Wilms, R. Ojha, E. Ros, W. Baumgartner, T. Beuchert, J. Blanchard, C. Bürkel, B. Carpenter, P.G. Edwards, D. Eisenacher Glawion, D. Elsässer, U. Fritsch, N. Gehrels, C. Gräfe, C. Großberger, H. Hase, S. Horiuchi, A. Kappes, A. Kreikenbohm, I. Kreykenbohm, M. Langejahn, K. Leiter, E. Litzinger, J.E.J. Lovell, C. Müller, C. Phillips, C. Plötz, J. Quick, T. Steinbring, J. Stevens, D. J. Thompson, A.K. Tzioumis
    May 18, 2015 astro-ph.HE
    The source(s) of the neutrino excess reported by the IceCube Collaboration is unknown. The TANAMI Collaboration recently reported on the multiwavelength emission of six bright, variable blazars which are positionally coincident with two of the most energetic IceCube events. Objects like these are prime candidates to be the source of the highest-energy cosmic rays, and thus of associated neutrino emission. We present an analysis of neutrino emission from the six blazars using observations with the ANTARES neutrino telescope.The standard methods of the ANTARES candidate list search are applied to six years of data to search for an excess of muons --- and hence their neutrino progenitors --- from the directions of the six blazars described by the TANAMI Collaboration, and which are possibly associated with two IceCube events. Monte Carlo simulations of the detector response to both signal and background particle fluxes are used to estimate the sensitivity of this analysis for different possible source neutrino spectra. A maximum-likelihood approach, using the reconstructed energies and arrival directions of through-going muons, is used to identify events with properties consistent with a blazar origin.Both blazars predicted to be the most neutrino-bright in the TANAMI sample (1653$-$329 and 1714$-$336) have a signal flux fitted by the likelihood analysis corresponding to approximately one event. This observation is consistent with the blazar-origin hypothesis of the IceCube event IC14 for a broad range of blazar spectra, although an atmospheric origin cannot be excluded. No ANTARES events are observed from any of the other four blazars, including the three associated with IceCube event IC20. This excludes at a 90\% confidence level the possibility that this event was produced by these blazars unless the neutrino spectrum is flatter than $-2.4$.
  • The jet-counterjet system of the closest radio-loud active galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A) can be studied with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) on unprecedented small linear scales of ~0.018pc. These high-resolution observations provide essential information on jet emission and propagation within the inner parsec of an AGN jet. We present the results of a kinematic study performed within the framework of the Southern-hemisphere AGN monitoring program TANAMI. Over 3.5years, the evolution of the central-parsec jet structure of Cen A was monitored with VLBI. These observations reveal complex jet dynamics which are well explained by a spine-sheath structure supported by the downstream acceleration occurring where the jet becomes optically thin. Both moving and stationary jet features are tracked. A persistent local minimum in surface brightness suggests the presence of an obstacle interrupting the jet flow, which can be explained by the interaction of the jet with a star at a distance of ~0.4pc from the central black hole. We briefly discuss possible implications of such an interaction regarding the expected neutrino and high-energy emission and the effect on a putative planet.
  • Very-high-energy $\gamma$-ray observations of the active galaxy IC 310 with the MAGIC telescopes have revealed fast variability with doubling time scales of less than 4.8min. This implies that the emission region in IC 310 is smaller than 20% of the gravitational radius of the central supermassive black hole with a mass of $3\times 10^8 M_\odot$, which poses serious questions on the emission mechanism and classification of this enigmatic object. We report on the first quasi-simultaneous multi-frequency VLBI observations of IC 310 conducted with the EVN. We find a blazar-like one-sided core-jet structure on parsec scales, constraining the inclination angle to be less than $\sim 20^\circ$ but very small angles are excluded to limit the de-projected length of the large-scale radio jet.
  • Multiwavelength observations have revealed the highly unusual properties of the gamma-ray source PMN J1603-4904, which are difficult to reconcile with any other well established gamma-ray source class. The object is either a very atypical blazar or compact jet source seen at a larger angle to the line of sight. In order to determine the physical origin of the high-energy emission processes in PMN J1603-4904, we study the X-ray spectrum in detail. We performed quasi-simultaneous X-ray observations with XMM-Newton and Suzaku in 2013 September, resulting in the first high signal-to-noise X-ray spectrum of this source. The 2-10 keV X-ray spectrum can be well described by an absorbed power law with an emission line at 5.44$\pm$0.05 keV (observed frame). Interpreting this feature as a K{\alpha} line from neutral iron, we determine the redshift of PMN J1603-4904 to be z=0.18$\pm$0.01, corresponding to a luminosity distance of 872$\pm$54 Mpc. The detection of a redshifted X-ray emission line further challenges the original BL Lac classification of PMN J1603-4904. This result suggests that the source is observed at a larger angle to the line of sight than expected for blazars, and thus the source would add to the elusive class of gamma-ray loud misaligned-jet objects, possibly a {\gamma}-ray bright young radio galaxy.
  • Centaurus A is the closest radio-loud active galaxy. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) enables us to study the jet-counterjet system on milliarcsecond (mas) scales, providing essential information for jet emission and propagation models. We study the evolution of the central parsec jet structure of Cen A over 3.5 years. The proper motion analysis of individual jet components allows us to constrain jet formation and propagation and to test the proposed correlation of increased high energy flux with jet ejection events. Cen A is an exceptional laboratory for such detailed study as its proximity translates to unrivaled linear resolution, where 1 mas corresponds to 0.018 pc. The first 7 epochs of high-resolution TANAMI VLBI observations at 8 GHz of Cen A are presented, resolving the jet on (sub-)mas scales. They show a differential motion of the sub-pc scale jet with significantly higher component speeds further downstream where the jet becomes optically thin. We determined apparent component speeds within a range of 0.1c to 0.3c, as well as identified long-term stable features. In combination with the jet-to-counterjet ratio we can constrain the angle to the line of sight to ~12{\deg} to 45{\deg}. The high resolution kinematics are best explained by a spine-sheath structure supported by the downstream acceleration occurring where the jet becomes optically thin. On top of the underlying, continuous flow, TANAMI observations clearly resolve individual jet features. The flow appears to be interrupted by an obstacle causing a local decrease in surface brightness and a circumfluent jet behavior. We propose a jet-star interaction scenario to explain this appearance. The comparison of jet ejection times with high X-ray flux phases yields a partial overlap of the onset of the X-ray emission and increasing jet activity, but the limited data do not support a robust correlation.
  • We investigate the onset of photoionization shakeup induced interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) in He2 at the He+*(n = 2) threshold by detecting two He+ ions in coincidence. We find this threshold to be shifted towards higher energies compared to the same threshold in the monomer. The shifted onset of ion pairs created by ICD is attributed to a recapture of the threshold photoelectron after the emission of the faster ICD electron.
  • Nitrogen impurities help to stabilize the negatively-charged-state of NV$^-$ in diamond, whereas magnetic fluctuations from nitrogen spins lead to decoherence of NV$^-$ qubits. It is not known what donor concentration optimizes these conflicting requirements. Here we used 10-MeV $^{15}$N$^{3+}$ ion implantation to create NV$^-$ in ultrapure diamond. Optically detected magnetic resonance of single centers revealed a high creation yield of $40\pm3$% from $^{15}$N$^{3+}$ ions and an additional yield of $56\pm3$% from $^{14}$N impurities. High-temperature anneal was used to reduce residual defects, and charge stable NV$^-$, even in a dilute $^{14}$N impurity concentration of 0.06 ppb were created with long coherence times.
  • Context. Blazars are a subset of active galactic nuclei (AGN) with jets that are oriented along our line of sight. Variability and spectral energy distribution (SED) studies are crucial tools for understanding the physical processes responsible for observed AGN emission. Aims. We report peculiar behaviour in the bright gamma-ray blazar PKS 1424-418 and use its strong variability to reveal information about the particle acceleration and interactions in the jet. Methods. Correlation analysis of the extensive optical coverage by the ATOM telescope and nearly continuous gamma-ray coverage by the Fermi Large Area Telescope is combined with broadband, time-dependent modeling of the SED incorporating supplemental information from radio and X-ray observations of this blazar. Results. We analyse in detail four bright phases at optical-GeV energies. These flares of PKS 1424-418 show high correlation between these energy ranges, with the exception of one large optical flare that coincides with relatively low gamma-ray activity. Although the optical/gamma-ray behaviour of PKS 1424-418 shows variety, the multiwavelength modeling indicates that these differences can largely be explained by changes in the flux and energy spectrum of the electrons in the jet that are radiating. We find that for all flares the SED is adequately represented by a leptonic model that includes inverse Compton emission from external radiation fields with similar parameters. Conclusions. Detailed studies of individual blazars like PKS 1424-418 during periods of enhanced activity in different wavebands are helping us identify underlying patterns in the physical parameters in this class of AGN.