• We present Direct Numerical Simulations of the transport of heat and heavy elements across a double-diffusive interface or a double-diffusive staircase, in conditions that are close to those one may expect to find near the boundary between the heavy-element rich core and the hydrogen-helium envelope of giant planets such as Jupiter. We find that the non-dimensional ratio of the buoyancy flux associated with heavy element transport to the buoyancy flux associated with heat transport lies roughly between 0.5 and 1, which is much larger than previous estimates derived by analogy with geophysical double-diffusive convection. Using these results in combination with a core-erosion model proposed by Guillot et al. (2004), we find that the entire core of Jupiter would be eroded within less than 1Myr assuming that the core-envelope boundary is composed of a single interface. We also propose an alternative model that is more appropriate in the presence of a well-established double-diffusive staircase, and find that in this limit a large fraction of the core could be preserved. These findings are interesting in the context of Juno's recent results, but call for further modeling efforts to better understand the process of core erosion from first principles.
  • Fingering convection (or thermohaline convection) is a weak yet important kind of mixing that occurs in stably-stratified stellar radiation zones in the presence of an inverse mean-molecular-weight gradient. Brown et al. (2013) recently proposed a new model for mixing by fingering convection, which contains no free parameter, and was found to fit the results of direct numerical simulations in almost all cases. Notably, however, they found that mixing was substantially enhanced above their predicted values in the few cases where large-scale gravity waves, followed by thermo-compositional layering, grew spontaneously from the fingering convection. This effect is well-known in the oceanographic context, and is attributed to the excitation of the so-called "collective instability". In this work, we build on the results of Brown et al. (2013) and of Traxler et al. (2011b) to determine the conditions under which the collective instability may be expected. We find that it is only relevant in stellar regions which have a relatively large Prandtl number (the ratio of the kinematic viscosity to the thermal diffusivity), $O(10^{-3})$ or larger. This implies that the collective instability cannot occur in main sequence stars, where the Prandtl number is always much smaller than this (except in the outer layers of surface convection zones where fingering is irrelevant anyway). It could in principle be excited in regions of high electron degeneracy, during He core flash, or in the interiors of white dwarfs. We discuss the implications of our findings for these objects, both from a theoretical and from an observational point of view.
  • Jupiter's atmosphere has been observed to be depleted in helium (Yatm~0.24), suggesting active helium sedimentation in the interior. This is accounted for in standard Jupiter structure and evolution models through the assumption of an outer, He-depleted envelope that is separated from the He-enriched deep interior by a sharp boundary. Here we aim to develop a model for Jupiter's inhomogeneous thermal evolution that relies on a more self-consistent description of the internal profiles of He abundance, temperature, and heat flux. We make use of recent numerical simulations on H/He demixing, and on layered (LDD) and oscillatory (ODD) double diffusive convection, and assume an idealized planet model composed of a H/He envelope and a massive core. A general framework for the construction of interior models with He rain is described. Despite, or perhaps because of, our simplifications made we find that self-consistent models are rare. For instance, no model for ODD convection is found. We modify the H/He phase diagram of Lorenzen et al. to reproduce Jupiter's atmospheric helium abundance and examine evolution models as a function of the LDD layer height, from those that prolong Jupiter's cooling time to those that actually shorten it. Resulting models that meet the luminosity constraint have layer heights of about 0.1-1 km, corresponding to ~10,-20,000 layers in the rain zone between ~1 and 3-4.5 Mbars. Present limitations and directions for future work are discussed, such as the formation and sinking of He droplets.