• Lipid bilayers composed of non-alpha hydroxy sphingosine ceramide (CER NS), cholesterol (CHOL), and free fatty acids (FFA), which are components of the human skin barrier, are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. Since mixtures of these lipids exist in dense gel phases with little molecular mobility at physiological conditions, care must be taken to ensure that the simulations become decorrelated from the initial conditions. Thus, we propose and validate an equilibration protocol based on simulated tempering in which the simulation takes a random walk through temperature space, allowing the system to break out of metastable configurations and hence become decorrelated form its initial configuration. After validating the equilibration protocol, the effects of the lipid composition and ceramide tail length on bilayer properties are studied. Systems containing pure CER NS, CER NS + CHOL, and CER NS + CHOL + FFA, with the CER fatty acid tail length varied within each CER NS-CHOL-FFA composition, are simulated. The bilayer thickness is found to depend on the structure of the center of the bilayer, which arises as a result of the tail length asymmetry between the lipids studied. The hydrogen bonding between the lipid headgroups and with water is found to change with the overall lipid composition, but is mostly independent of the CER fatty acid tail length. Subtle differences in the lateral packing of the lipid tails are also found as a function of CER tail length. Overall, these results provide insight into the experimentally observed trend of altered barrier properties in skin systems where there are more ceramides with shorter tails present.
  • Aims. The brown dwarf (BD) formation process has not yet been completely understood. To shed more light on the differences and similarities between star and BD formation processes, we study and compare the disk fraction among both kinds of objects over a large angular region in the Taurus cloud. In addition, we examine the spatial distribution of stars and BD relative to the underlying molecular gas Methods. In this paper, we present new and updated photometry data from the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope on 43 BDs in the Taurus cloud, and recalculate of the BD disk fraction in this region. We also useed recently available CO mm data to study the spatial distribution of stars and BDs relative to the cloud's molecular gas. Results. We find that the disk fraction among BDs in the Taurus cloud is 41 \pm 12%, a value statistically consistent with the one among TTS (58 \pm 9%). We find that BDs in transition from a state where they have a disk to a diskless state are rare, and we study one isolated example of a transitional disk with an inner radius of \approx 0.1 AU (CFHT BD Tau 12, found via its relatively small mid-IR excess compared to most members of Taurus that have disks. We find that BDs are statistically found in regions of similar molecular gas surface density to those associated with stars. Furthermore, we find that the gas column density distribution is almost identical for stellar and substellar objects with and without disks.
  • We present new high spatial resolution (<~ 0.1") 1-5 micron adaptive optics images, interferometric 1.3 mm continuum and 12CO 2-1 maps, and 350 micron, 2.8 and 3.3 mm fluxes measurements of the HV Tau system. Our adaptive optics images reveal an unusually slow orbital motion within the tight HV Tau AB pair that suggests a highly eccentric orbit and/or a large deprojected physical separation. Scattered light images of the HV Tau C edge-on protoplanetary disk suggest that the anisotropy of the dust scattering phase function is almost independent of wavelength from 0.8 to 5 micron, whereas the dust opacity decreases significantly over the same range. The images further reveal a marked lateral asymmetry in the disk that does not vary over a timescale of 2 years. We further detect a radial velocity gradient in the disk in our 12CO map that lies along the same position angle as the elongation of the continuum emission, which is consistent with Keplerian rotation around an 0.5-1 Msun central star, suggesting that it could be the most massive component in the triple system. We use a powerful radiative transfer model to compute synthetic disk observations and use a Bayesian inference method to extract constraints on the disk properties. Each individual image, as well as the spectral energy distribution, of HV Tau C can be well reproduced by our models with fully mixed dust provided grain growth has already produced larger-than-interstellar dust grains. However, no single model can satisfactorily simultaneously account for all observations. We suggest that future attempts to model this source include more complex dust properties and possibly vertical stratification. (Abridged)
  • We present the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) and Keck observations of HDE 245059, a young weak-lined T Tauri star (WTTS), member of the pre-main sequence group in the Lambda Orionis Cluster. Our high spatial resolution, near-infrared observations with Keck reveal that HDE 245059 a binary separated by 0.87". Based on this new information we have obtained an estimate of the masses of the binary components; 3M_{sun} and 2.5M_{sun} for the north and south components, respectively. We have estimated the age of the system to be ~2-3 Myr. We detect both components of the binary in the zeroth order Chandra image and in the grating spectra. Our fits to the spectrum of the binary have shown that the emission is dominated by a plasma between 8 and 15 MK, a soft component at 4 MK and a hard component at 50 MK are also detected. The value of the hydrogen column density was low, 8 x 10^{19} cm^{-2}, likely due to the clearing of the inner region of the Lambda Orionis cloud. The abundance pattern shows an inverse First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect for all elements from O to Fe, the only exception being Ca. A 3-T model was fitted to the individual zeroth order spectra using the abundances derived for the binary. We have also obtained several lines fluxes from the grating spectra. The fits to the triplets show no evidence of high densities. We conclude that the X-ray properties of the weak-lined T Tau binary HDE 245059 are similar to those generally observed in other weak-lined T Tau stars. Although its accretion history may have been affected by the clearing of the interstellar material around Lambda Ori, its coronal properties appears not to have been strongly modified.
  • We present the results of a five year monitoring campaign of the close binary TWA 5Aab in the TW Hydrae association, using speckle and adaptive optics on the W.M. Keck 10 m telescopes. These measurements were taken as part of our ongoing monitoring of pre-main sequence (PMS) binaries in an effort to increase the number of dynamically determined PMS masses and thereby calibrate the theoretical PMS evolutionary tracks. Our observations have allowed us to obtain the first determination of this system's astrometric orbit. We find an orbital period of 5.94 +- 0.09 years and a semi-major axis of 0.066" +- 0.005". Combining these results with a kinematic distance, we calculate a total mass of 0.71 +- 0.14 M_sun (D/44 pc)^3. for this system. This mass measurement, as well as the estimated age of this system, are consistent to within 2$\sigma$ of all theoretical models considered. In this analysis, we properly account for correlated uncertainties, and show that while these correlations are generally ignored, they increase the formal uncertainties by up to a factor of five and therefore are important to incorporate. With only a few more years of observation, this type of measurement will allow the theoretical models to be distinguished.
  • The formation of a binary system surrounded by disks is the most common outcome of stellar formation. Hence studying and understanding the formation and the evolution of binary systems and associated disks is a cornerstone of star formation science. Moreover, since the components within binary systems are coeval and the sizes of their disks are fixed by the tidal truncation of their companion, binary systems provide an ideal "laboratory" in which to study disk evolution under well defined boundary conditions. In this paper, we review observations of several inner disk diagnostics in multiple systems, including hydrogen emission lines (indicative of ongoing accretion), $K-L$ and $K-N$ color excesses (evidence of warm inner disks), and polarization (indicative of the relative orientations of the disks around each component). We examine to what degree these properties are correlated within binary systems and how this degree of correlation depends on parameters such as separation and binary mass ratio. These findings will be interpreted both in terms of models that treat each disk as an isolated reservoir and those in which the disks are subject to re-supply from some form of circumbinary reservoir, the observational evidence for which we will also critically review. The planet forming potential of multiple star systems is discussed in terms of the relative lifetimes of disks around single stars, binary primaries and binary secondaries. Finally, we summarize several potentially revealing observational problems and future projects that could provide further insight into disk evolution in the coming decade
  • We present a high spatial resolution, 10-20 micron survey of 65 T Tauri binary stars in Taurus, Ophiuchus, and Corona Australis using the Keck 10 m telescopes. Designed to probe the inner ~1 AU region of the circumstellar disks around the individual stellar components in these binary systems, this study increases the number of binaries with spatially resolved measurements at 10 micron by a factor of ~5. Combined with resolved near-infrared photometry and spectroscopic accretion diagnostics, we find that ~10% of stars with a mid-infrared excess do not appear to be accreting. In contrast to an actively accreting disk system, these passive disks have significantly lower near-infrared colors that are, in most cases, consistent with photospheric emission, suggesting the presence of an inner disk hole. In addition, there appears to be a spectral type/mass dependence associated with the presence of a passive disk, with all passive disks occurring around M type stars. The possibility that the passive disks are caused by the presence of an as yet undetected companion at a small separation (0.3-3 AU) is possible for any individual system, however, it cannot account for the spectral type dependence of the passive disk sample as a whole. We propose that these passive disks represent a subset of T Tauri stars that are undergoing significant disk evolution. The fraction of observed passive disks and the observed spectral type dependence can both be explained by models of disk evolution that include disk photoevaporation from the central star. (abridged).
  • The explosion that results in a cosmic gamma-ray burst (GRB) is thought to produce emission from two physical processes -- the activity of the central engine gives rise to the high-energy emission of the burst through internal shocking and the subsequent interaction of the flow with the external environment produces long-wavelength afterglow. While afterglow observations continue to refine our understanding of GRB progenitors and relativistic shocks, gamma-ray observations alone have not yielded a clear picture of the origin of the prompt emission nor details of the central engine. Only one concurrent visible-light transient has been found and was associated with emission from an external shock. Here we report the discovery of infrared (IR) emission contemporaneous with a GRB, beginning 7.2 minutes after the onset of GRB 041219a. Our robotic telescope acquired 21 images during the active phase of the burst, yielding the earliest multi-colour observations of any long-wavelength emission associated with a GRB. Analysis of an initial IR pulse suggests an origin consistent with internal shocks. This opens a new possibility to study the central engine of GRBs with ground-based observations at long wavelengths.
  • We report spatially resolved 11.8 micron images, obtained at the W. M. Keck 10 m telescope, of the protoplanetary disk around the pre--main-sequence star HK Tau B. The mid-infrared morphology and astrometry of HK Tau B with respect to HK Tau A indicate that the flux observed in the mid-infrared from HK Tau B has been scattered off the upper surface of its nearly edge-on disk. This is the first example of a protoplanetary disk observed in scattered light at mid-infrared wavelengths. Monte Carlo simulations of this disk show that the extent (FWHM =0."5, or 70 AU) of the scattered light nebula in the mid-infrared is very sensitive to the dust size distribution. The 11.8 micron measurement can be best modelled by a dust grain population that contains grains on the order of 1.5-3 micron in size; grain populations with exclusively sub-micron grain sizes or power law size distributions that extend beyond 5 micron cannot reproduce the observed morphology. These grains are significantly larger than those expected in the ISM implying that grain growth has occurred; whether this growth is a result of dust evolution within the disk itself or had originally occurred within the dark cloud remains an open question.
  • We present new multi-epoch near-infrared and optical high-angular images of the V773 Tau pre-main sequence triple system, a weak-line T Tauri (WTTS) system in which the presence of an evolved, ``fossil'' protoplanetary disk has been inferred on the basis of a significant infrared excess. Our images reveal a fourth object bound to the system, V773 Tau D. While it is much fainter than all other components at 2 micron, it is the brightest source in the system at 4.7 micron. We also present medium-resolution K band adaptive optics spectroscopy of this object, which is featureless with the exception of a weak Br gamma emission line. Based on this spectrum and on the spectral energy distribution of the system, we show that V773 Tau D is another member of the small class of ``infrared companions'' (IRCs) to T Tauri stars. It is the least luminous, and probably the least massive, component of the system, as opposed to most other IRCs, which suggests that numerous low-luminosity IRCs such as V773 Tau D may still remain to be discovered. Furthermore, it is the source of the strong IR excess in the system. We therefore reject the interpretation of this excess as the signature of a fossil (or ``passive'') disk and further suggest that these systems may be much less frequent than previously thought. We further show that V773 Tau C is a variable classical T Tauri star (CTTS) and that its motion provides a well constrained orbital model. We show that V773 Tau D can be dynamically stable within this quadruple system if its orbit is highly inclined. Finally, V773 Tau is the first multiple system to display such a variety of evolutionary states (WTTS, CTTS, IRC), which may be the consequence of the strong star-star interactions in this compact quadruple system.
  • We present deep, near-infrared images of the circumbinary disk surrounding the pre-main-sequence binary star, GG Tau A, obtained with NICMOS aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The spatially resolved proto-planetary disk scatters roughly 1.5% of the stellar flux, with a near-to-far side flux ratio of ~1.4, independent of wavelength, and colors that are comparable to the central source; all of these properties are significantly different from the earlier ground-based observations. New Monte Carlo scattering simulations of the disk emphasize that the general properties of the disk, such as disk flux, near side to far side flux ratio and integrated colors, can be approximately reproduced using ISM-like dust grains, without the presence of either circumstellar disks or large dust grains, as had previously been suggested. A single parameter phase function is fitted to the observed azimuthal variation in disk flux, providing a lower limit on the median grain size of 0.23 micron. Our analysis, in comparison to previous simulations, shows that the major limitation to the study of grain growth in T Tauri disk systems through scattered light lies in the uncertain ISM dust grain properties. Finally, we use the 9 year baseline of astrometric measurements of the binary to solve the complete orbit, assuming that the binary is coplanar with the circumbinary ring. We find that the estimated 1 sigma range on disk inner edge to semi-major axis ratio, 3.2 < Rin/a < 6.7, is larger than that estimated by previous SPH simulations of binary-disk interactions.