• On 2017 August 17, gravitational waves were detected from a binary neutron star merger, GW170817, along with a coincident short gamma-ray burst, GRB170817A. An optical transient source, Swope Supernova Survey 17a (SSS17a), was subsequently identified as the counterpart of this event. We present ultraviolet, optical and infrared light curves of SSS17a extending from 10.9 hours to 18 days post-merger. We constrain the radioactively-powered transient resulting from the ejection of neutron-rich material. The fast rise of the light curves, subsequent decay, and rapid color evolution are consistent with multiple ejecta components of differing lanthanide abundance. The late-time light curve indicates that SSS17a produced at least ~0.05 solar masses of heavy elements, demonstrating that neutron star mergers play a role in r-process nucleosynthesis in the Universe.
  • Despite their close proximity, the complex interplay between the two Magellanic Clouds, the Milky Way, and the resulting tidal features, is still poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) has a very extended disk strikingly perturbed in its outskirts. We search for recent star formation in the far outskirts of the LMC, out to ~30 degrees from its center. We have collected intermediate-resolution spectra of thirty-one young star candidates in the periphery of the LMC and measured their radial velocity, stellar parameters, distance and age. Our measurements confirm membership to the LMC of six targets, for which the radial velocity and distance values match well those of the Cloud. These objects are all young (10-50 Myr), main-sequence stars projected between 7 and 13 degrees from the center of the parent galaxy. We compare the velocities of our stars with those of a disk model, and find that our stars have low to moderate velocity differences with the disk model predictions, indicating that they were formed in situ. Our study demonstrates that recent star formation occurred in the far periphery of the LMC, where thus far only old objects were known. The spatial configuration of these newly-formed stars appears ring-like with a radius of 12 kpc, and a displacement of 2.6 kpc from the LMC's center. This structure, if real, would be suggestive of a star-formation episode triggered by an off-center collision between the Small Magellanic Cloud and the LMC's disk.
  • We present the abundance analysis for a sample of 17 red giant branch stars in the metal-poor globular cluster M28 based on high resolution spectra. This is the first extensive spectroscopic study of this cluster. We derive abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, and Eu. We find a metallicity of [Fe/H]=-1.29+-0.01 and an alpha-enhancement of +0.34+-0.01 (errors on the mean), typical of Halo Globular Clusters in this metallicity regime. A large spread is observed in the abundances of light elements O, Na, and Al. Mg also shows an anticorrelation with Al with a significance of 3 sigma. The cluster shows a Na-O anticorrelation and a Na-Al correlation. This correlation is not linear but "segmented" and that the stars are not distributed continuously, but form at least 3 well separated sub-populations. In this aspect M28 resembles NGC~2808 that was found to host at least 5 sub-populations. The presence of a Mg-Al anticorrelation favor massive AGB stars as the main polluters responsible for the multiple-population phenomenon.
  • We used ultra-deep $J$ and $K_s$ images secured with the near-infrared GSAOI camera assisted by the multi-conjugate adaptive optics system GeMS at the GEMINI South Telescope in Chile, to obtain a ($K_s$, $J-K_s$) color-magnitude diagram (CMD) for the bulge globular cluster NGC 6624. We obtained the deepest and most accurate near-infrared CMD from the ground for this cluster, by reaching $K_s$ $\sim$ 21.5, approximately 8 magnitudes below the horizontal branch level. The entire extension of the Main Sequence (MS) is nicely sampled and at $K_s$ $\sim$ 20 we detected the so-called MS "knee" in a purely near-infrared CMD. By taking advantage of the exquisite quality of the data, we estimated the absolute age of NGC 6624 ($t_{age}$ = 12.0 $\pm$ 0.5 Gyr), which turns out to be in good agreement with previous studies in the literature. We also analyzed the luminosity and mass functions of MS stars down to M $\sim$ 0.45 M$_{\odot}$ finding evidence of a significant increase of low-mass stars at increasing distances from the cluster center. This is a clear signature of mass segregation, confirming that NGC 6624 is in an advanced stage of dynamical evolution.
  • Using three-dimensional stellar kinematic data from simulated galaxies, we examine the efficacy of a Jeans equation analysis in reconstructing the total disk surface density, including the dark matter, at the "Solar" radius. Our simulation dataset includes galaxies formed in a cosmological context using state-of-the-art high resolution cosmological zoom simulations, and other idealised models. The cosmologically formed galaxies have been demonstrated to lie on many of the observed scaling relations for late-type spirals, and thus offer an interesting surrogate for real galaxies with the obvious advantage that all the kinematical data are known perfectly. We show that the vertical velocity dispersion is typically the dominant kinematic quantity in the analysis, and that the traditional method of using only the vertical force is reasonably effective at low heights above the disk plane. At higher heights the inclusion of the radial force becomes increasingly important. We also show that the method is sensitive to uncertainties in the measured disk parameters, particularly the scale lengths of the assumed double exponential density distribution, and the scale length of the radial velocity dispersion. In addition, we show that disk structure and low number statistics can lead to significant errors in the calculated surface densities. Finally we examine the implications of our results for previous studies of this sort, suggesting that more accurate measurements of the scale lengths may help reconcile conflicting estimates of the local dark matter density in the literature.
  • Dynamical interactions in binary systems are thought to play a major role in the formation of extreme horizontal branch stars (EHBs) in the Galactic field. However, it is still unclear if the same mechanisms are at work in globular clusters, where EHBs are predominantly single stars. Here we report on the discovery of a unique close binary system (period ~1.61 days) in the globular cluster NGC6752, comprising an EHB and a main-sequence companion of 0.63+-0.05 Msun. Such a system has no counterpart among nearly two hundred known EHB binaries in the Galactic field. Its discovery suggests that either field studies are incomplete, missing this type of systems possibly because of selection effects, or that a particular EHB formation mechanism is active in clusters but not in the field.
  • Low mass dwarf spheroidal galaxies are key objects for our understanding of the chemical evolution of the pristine Universe and the Local Group of galaxies. Abundance ratios in stars of these objects can be used to better understand their star formation and chemical evolution. We report on the analysis of a sample of 11 stars belonging to 5 different ultra faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UfDSph) based on X-Shooter spectra obtained at the VLT. Medium resolution spectra have been used to determine the detailed chemical composition of their atmosphere. We performed a standard 1D LTE analysis to compute the abundances. Considering all the stars as representative of the same population of low mass galaxies, we found that the [alpha/Fe] ratios vs [Fe/H] decreases as the metallicity of the star increases in a way similar to what is found for the population of stars belonging to dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The main difference is that the solar [alpha/Fe] is reached at a much lower metallicity for the UfDSph than the dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We report for the first time the abundance of strontium in CVnI. The star we analyzed in this galaxy has a very high [Sr/Fe] and a very low upper limit of barium which makes it a star with an exceptionally high [Sr/Ba] ratio. Our results seem to indicate that the galaxies which have produced the bulk of their stars before the reionization (fossil galaxies) have lower [X/Fe] ratios at a given metallicity than the galaxies that have experienced a discontinuity in their star formation rate (quenching).
  • Context. In the Milky Way, most globular clusters are highly conspicuous objects that were found centuries ago. However, a few dozen of them are faint, sparsely populated systems that were identified largely during the second half of the past century. One of the faintest is ESO 37-1 (E 3) and as such it remains poorly studied, with no spectroscopic observations published so far, although it was discovered in 1976. Aims. We investigate the globular cluster E 3 in an attempt to better constrain its fundamental parameters. Spectroscopy of stars in the field of E 3 is shown here for the first time. Methods. Deep, precise VI CCD photometry of E 3 down to V=26 mag is presented and analysed. Low-resolution, medium signal-to-noise ratio spectra of nine candidate members are studied to derive radial velocity and metallicity. Proper motions from the UCAC4 catalogue are used to explore the kinematics of the bright members of E 3. Results. Isochrone fitting indicates that E 3 is probably very old, with an age of about 13 Gyr; its distance from the Sun is nearly 10 kpc. It is also somewhat metal rich with [Fe/H]=-0.7. Regarding its kinematics, our tentative estimate for the proper motions is (-7.0+/-0.8, 3.5+/-0.3) mas/yr (or a tangential velocity of 382+/-79 km/s) and for the radial velocity is 45+/-5 km/s, in the solar rest frame. Conclusions. E 3 is one of the most intriguing globular clusters in the Galaxy. Having an old age and being metal rich is clearly a peculiar combination, only seen in a handful of objects like the far more conspicuous NGC 104 (47 Tucanae). In addition, its low luminosity and sparse population make it a unique template for the study of the final evolutionary phases in the life of a star cluster. Unfortunately, E 3 is among the most elusive and challenging known globular clusters because field contamination severely hampers spectroscopic studies.
  • By exploiting the exceptional high-resolution capabilities of the near-IR camera GSAOI combined with the multi-conjugate adaptive optics system GeMS at the GEMINI South Telescope, we investigated the structural and physical properties of the heavily obscured globular cluster Liller 1 in the Galactic bulge. We have obtained the deepest and most accurate color-magnitude diagram published so far for this cluster, reaching Ks ~ 19 (below the main sequence turn-off level). We used these data to re-determine the center of gravity of the system, finding that it is located about 2.2" south-east from the literature value. We also built new star density and surface brightness profiles for the cluster, and re-derived its main structural and physical parameters (scale radii, concentration parameter, central mass density, total mass). We find that Liller 1 is significantly less concentrated (concentration parameter c=1.74) and less extended (tidal radius r_t=298" and core radius r_c=5.39") than previously thought. By using these newly determined structural parameters we estimated the mass of Liller 1 M_tot = 2.3 x 10^6 Msun (Mtot = 1.5 x 10^6 Msun for a Kroupa IMF), which is comparable to that of the most massive clusters in the Galaxy (omega Centauri and Terzan 5). Also Liller 1 has the second highest collision rate (after Terzan 5) among all star clusters in the Galaxy, thus confirming that it is an ideal environment for the formation of collisional objects (such as millisecond pulsars).
  • In 2012, we applied a three-dimensional formulation to kinematic measurements of the Galactic thick disk and derived a surprisingly low dark matter density at the solar position. This result was challenged by Bovy & Tremaine (2012, ApJ, 756, 89), who claimed that the observational data are consistent with the expected dark matter density if a one-dimensional approach is adopted. We analyze the assumption at the bases of their formulation and their claim that this returns a lower limit for the local dark matter density, which is accurate within 20%. We find that the validity of their formulation depends on the underlying mass distribution. We therefore analyze the predictions that their hypothesis casts on the radial gradient of the azimuthal velocity dV/dR and compare it with observational data as a testbed for the validity of their formulation. We find that their hypothesis requires too steep a profile of dV(Z)/dR, which is inconsistent with the observational data both in the Milky Way and in external galaxies. As a consequence, their results are biased and largely overestimate the mass density. Dynamical simulations also show that, contrary to their claims, low values of dV/dR are compatible with a Milky Way like potential with radially constant circular velocity. We nevertheless confirm that, according to their criticism, our assumption dV/dR=0 is only an approximation. If this hypothesis is released, and the available information about dV/dR in the thick disk is used, the resulting local dark matter density increases by a tiny amount, from 0+-1 to 2+-3 mM_sun pc^(-3), with an upper limit of ~3.5 mM_sun pc^(-3). Hence, this approximation has negligible influence on our results. Our analysis shows that their criticism is not a viable explanation for the inferred lack of dark matter at the solar position detected by us. More studies are required to understand these unexpected results.
  • VISTA Variables in the V\'ia L\'actea (VVV) is one of six ESO Public Surveys using the 4 meter Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA). The VVV survey covers the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the disk, and one of the principal objectives is to search for new star clusters within previously unreachable obscured parts of the Galaxy. The primary motivation behind this work is to discover and analyze obscured star clusters in the direction of the inner Galactic disk and bulge. Regions of the inner disk and bulge covered by the VVV survey were visually inspected using composite JHKs color images to select new cluster candidates on the basis of apparent overdensities. DR1, DR2, CASU, and PSF photometry of 10x10 arcmin fields centered on each candidate cluster were used to construct color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. Follow-up spectroscopy of the brightest members of several cluster candidates was obtained in order to clarify their nature. We report the discovery of 58 new infrared cluster candidates. Fundamental parameters such as age, distance, and metallicity were determined for 20 of the most populous clusters.
  • Andrews-Lindsay 1 is a pertinent open cluster granted it may host the planetary nebula PHR 1315-6555, yet ambiguities linger concerning its fundamental parameters (>50% scatter). New multiband BVJHW(1-4) photometry for cluster and field stars, in concert with observations of recently discovered classical Cepheids, were used to constrain the reddening and velocity-distance profiles along the sight-line. That analysis yielded the following parameters for the cluster: E(J-H)=0.24+-0.03, d=10.0+-0.4 kpc (d(JH)=9.9+-0.6 kpc, d(BV)=10.1+-0.5 kpc), and log(t)=8.90+-0.15. The steep velocity-distance gradient along l~305 indicates that two remote objects sharing spatial and kinematic parameters (i.e., PHR 1315-6555 and Andrews-Lindsay 1) are associated, thus confirming claims that the PN is a cluster member (e.g., Parker et al.). The new distance for PHR 1315-6555 is among the most precise yet established for a Galactic PN (err_d=4%).
  • Context. [...] One of the most efficient methods is the measurement of the equivalent width (EW) of the Calcium II Triplet (CaT), corrected for the luminosity and temperature effects via magnitude differences from the horizontal branch (HB). Methods. We use the Ks magnitude difference between the star and the reddest part of the HB (RHB) to generate reduced equivalent widths (rEW) from the datasets presented in Saviane et al. (2012) and Rutledge et al. (1997). Subsequently we calibrated these rEW against three different metellicity (met) scales: the one presented in Carretta et al. (2009), the met values given in Harris (2010) and a version of the former corrected via high-resolution spectroscopic met. Results. We calculated the calibration relations for the two datasets and the three met scales and found that they are approximately equivalent, with differences almost negligible. We compared our nIR calibrations with the corresponding optical ones, and found them to be equivalent, establishing that the luminosity-corrected rEW using the Ks magnitude is compatible with the one obtained from the V magnitude. We then used the met obtained from the calibration to investigate the internal met distributions of the GCs. Conclusions. We have established that the ([Fe/H]:rEW) relation is independent from the mag used for the luminosity correction and find that the calibration relations only change slightly for different met scales. The CaT technique using NIR photometry is thus a powerful tool to derive met. In particular, it can be used to study the internal met spread of a GC. We confirm the presence of at least two met populations in NGC 6656 and find that several other GCs present peculiar met distributions.
  • The Vista Variables in the V\'ia L\'actea (VVV) ESO Public Survey is an ongoing time-series, near-infrared (IR) survey of the Galactic bulge and an adjacent portion of the inner disk, covering 562 square degrees of the sky, using ESO's VISTA telescope. The survey has provided superb multi-color photometry in 5 broadband filters ($Z$, $Y$, $J$, $H$, and $K_s$), leading to the best map of the inner Milky Way ever obtained, particularly in the near-IR. The main variability part of the survey, which is focused on $K_s$-band observations, is currently underway, with bulge fields having been observed between 31 and 70 times, and disk fields between 17 and 36 times. When the survey is complete, bulge (disk) fields will have been observed up to a total of 100 (60) times, providing unprecedented depth and time coverage. Here we provide a first overview of stellar variability in the VVV data, including examples of the light curves that have been collected thus far, scientific applications, and our efforts towards the automated classification of VVV light curves.
  • New and existing X-ray, UBVJHKsW(1-4), and spectroscopic observations were analyzed to constrain fundamental parameters for M25, NGC 7790, and dust along their sight-lines. The star clusters are of particular importance given they host the classical Cepheids U Sgr, CF Cas, and the visual binary Cepheids CEa and CEb Cas. Precise results from the multiband analysis, in tandem with a comprehensive determination of the Cepheids' period evolution (dP/dt) from ~140 years of observations, helped resolve concerns raised regarding the clusters and their key Cepheid constituents. Specifically, distances derived for members of M25 and NGC 7790 are 630+-25 pc and 3.40+-0.15 kpc, respectively.
  • All old Galactic Globular Clusters studied in detail to date host at least two generations of stars, where the second is formed from gas polluted by processed material produced by massive stars of the first. This process can happen if the initial mass of the cluster exceeds a threshold above which ejecta are retained and a second generation is formed. A determination of this mass-threshold is mandatory in order to understand how GCs form. We analyzed 9 RGB stars belonging to the cluster Ruprecht 106. Targets were observed with the UVES@VLT2 spectrograph. Spectra cover a wide range and allowed us to measure abundances for light (O,Na,Mg,Al), alpha (Si,Ca,Ti), iron-peak (Sc,V,Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni,Cu,Zn) and neutron-capture (Y,Zr,Ba,La,Ce,Pr,Nd,Sm,Eu,Dy,Pb) elements. Based on these abundances we show that Ruprecht 106 is the first convincing example of a single population GC (i.e. a true simple stellar population), although the sample is relatively small. This result is supported also by an independent photometric test and by the HB morphology and the dynamical state. It is old (~12 Gyrs) and, at odds with other GCs, has no alpha-enhancement. The material it formed from was contaminated by both s- and r- process elements. The abundance pattern points toward an extragalactic origin. Its present day mass (M=10^4.83 Msun) can be assumed as a strong lower limit for the initial mass threshold below which no second generation is formed. Clearly, its initial mass must have been significantly greater but we have no current constraints on the amount of mass loss during its evolution.
  • We present our spectroscopic program aimed to study some new interesting features recently discovered in the Magellanic Cloud System. These were revealed by the spatial distribution of OB-type candidate stars, selected based on UV, optical and IR photometry and proper motions from existing large-area catalogs. As a pilot study of our project, we are studying OB-star candidates in the Leading Arm (LA) of the Magellanic Stream, a gaseous tidal structure with no stellar counterpart known so far. Our targets group in three clumps near regions of high HI density in the LA. If confirmed, these young stars would evidence recent star formation in the LA, and they would help better understand and constrain the formation of the LA and its interactions with the Milky Way.
  • Recent investigations revealed very peculiar properties of blue horizontal branch (HB) stars in \omega Centauri, which show anomalously low surface gravity and mass compared to other clusters and to theoretical models. \omega Centauri, however, is a very unusual object, hosting a complex mix of multiple stellar populations with different metallicity and chemical abundances. We measured the fundamental parameters (temperature, gravity, and surface helium abundance) of a sample of 71 blue HB stars in M22, with the aim of clarifying if the peculiar results found in \omega Cen are unique to this cluster. M22 also hosts multiple sub-populations of stars with a spread in metallicity, analogous to \omega Cen. The stellar parameters were measured on low-resolution spectra fitting the Balmer and helium lines with a grid of synthetic spectra. From these parameters, the mass and reddening were estimated. Our results on the gravities and masses agree well with theoretical expectations, matching the previous measurements in three "normal" clusters. The anomalies found in \omega Cen are not observed among our stars. A mild mass underestimate is found for stars hotter than 14\,000 K, but an exact analogy with \omega Cen cannot be drawn. We measured the reddening in the direction of M22 with two independent methods, finding E(B-V)=0.35 \pm 0.02 mag, with semi-amplitude of the maximum variation \Delta(E(B-V))=0.06 mag, and an rms intrinsic dispersion of \sigma(E(B-V))=0.03 mag.
  • If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remains elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI pass-bands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue and high resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decipher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically, kinematically and spatially unrelated to each other. However, after analysing proper motions, we find one relevant kinematic group. This sparse object is relatively close (about 1 kpc), metal poor and is probably not only one of the oldest clusters (3 Gyr) within 1.5 kpc from the Sun but also one of the clusters located farthest from the disc, at an altitude of nearly -900 pc. That makes NGC 1252 the first open cluster that can be truly considered a high Galactic altitude OCR: an unusual object that may hint at a star formation event induced on a high Galactic altitude gas cloud. TW Hor and HD 20286 are unlikely to be part of NGC 1252. NGC 1252 17 is identified as an unrelated, Population II cannonball star moving at about 400 km/s.
  • Cepheids are key to establishing the cosmic distance scale. Therefore it's important to assess the viability of QZ Nor, V340 Nor, and GU Nor as calibrators for Leavitt's law via their purported membership in the open cluster NGC 6067. The following suite of evidence confirms that QZ Nor and V340 Nor are members of NGC 6067, whereas GU Nor likely lies in the foreground: (i) existing radial velocities for QZ Nor and V340 Nor agree with that established for the cluster (-39.4+-1.2 km/s) to within 1 km/s, whereas GU Nor exhibits a markedly smaller value; (ii) a steep velocity-distance gradient characterizes the sight-line toward NGC 6067, thus implying that objects sharing common velocities are nearly equidistant; (iii) a radial profile constructed for NGC 6067 indicates that QZ Nor is within the cluster bounds, despite being 20' from the cluster center; (iv) new BVJH photometry for NGC 6067 confirms the cluster lies d=1.75+-0.10 kpc distant, a result that matches Wesenheit distances computed for QZ Nor/V340 Nor using the Benedict et al. (2007, HST parallaxes) calibration. QZ Nor is a cluster Cepheid that should be employed as a calibrator for the cosmic distance scale.
  • Context: The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the V\'ia L\'actea" (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. degrees of the Galactic bulge, and adjacent regions of the disk. In this survey nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered. Aims: This is the second in a series of papers about young, massive open clusters observed using the VVV survey. We present the first study of six recently discovered clusters. These clusters contain at least one newly discovered Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters for a subset of clusters. Results: We affirm that the six studied stellar groups are real young (2-7 Myr) and massive (between 0.8 and 2.2 10^3 Msol) clusters. They are highly obscured (Av ~ 5-24 mag) and compact (1-2 pc). In addition to WR stars, two of the six clusters also contain at least one red supergiant star. We claim the discovery of 8 new WR stars, and 3 stars showing WR-like emission lines which could be classified WR or OIf. Preliminary analysis provides initial masses of ~30-50 Msol for the WR stars. Finally,we discuss the spiral structure of the Galaxy using as tracers the six new clusters together with the previously studied VVV clusters.
  • We analyze the reddening, surface helium abundance and mass of 115 horizontal branch (HB) and blue hook (BH) stars in OmegaCentauri, spanning the HB from the blue edge of the instability strip to Teff~50000K. The mean cluster reddening is E(B-V)=0.115+-0.004, in good agreement with previous estimates, but we evidence a pattern of differential reddening in the cluster area. The stars in the western half are more reddened than in the southwest quadrant by 0.03-0.04 magnitudes. We find that the helium abundances measured on low-resolution spectra are systematically lower by ~0.25 dex than the measurements based on higher resolution. No difference in helium abundance is detected between OmegaCentauri and three comparison clusters, and the stars in the range 11500-20000K follow a trend with temperature, which probably reflects a variable efficiency of the diffusion processes. There is mild evidence that two families of extreme HB (EHB) stars (Teff>20000K) could exist, as observed in the field, with ~15% of the objects being helium depleted by a factor of ten with respect to the main population. The distribution of helium abundance above 30000K is bimodal, but we detect a fraction of He-poor objects lower than previous investigations. The observations are consistent with these being stars evolving off the HB. Their spatial distribution is not uniform, but this asymmetric distribution is only marginally significative. We also find that EHB stars with anomalously high spectroscopic mass could be present in OmegaCentauri, as previously found in other clusters. The derived temperature-color relation reveals that stars hotter than 11000K are fainter than the expectations of the canonical models in the U band, while no anomaly is detected in B and V. This behavior, not observed in NGC6752, is a new peculiarity of OmegaCentauri HB stars.
  • We measured the surface mass density of the Galactic disk at the solar position, up to 4 kpc from the plane,by means of the kinematics of ~400 thick disk stars. The results match the expectations for the visible mass only, and no dark matter is detected in the volume under analysis. The current models of dark matter halo are excluded with a significance higher than 5sigma, unless a highly prolate halo is assumed, very atypical in cold dark matter simulations. The resulting lack of dark matter at the solar position challenges the current models.
  • We estimated the dynamical surface mass density Sigma at the solar position between Z=1.5 and 4 kpc from the Galactic plane, as inferred from the kinematics of thick disk stars. The formulation is exact within the limit of validity of a few basic assumptions. The resulting trend of Sigma(Z) matches the expectations of visible mass alone, and no dark component is required to account for the observations. We extrapolate a dark matter (DM) density in the solar neighborhood of 0+-1 mM_sun pc^-3, and all the current models of a spherical DM halo are excluded at a confidence level higher than 4sigma. A detailed analysis reveals that a small amount of DM is allowed in the volume under study by the change of some input parameter or hypothesis, but not enough to match the expectations of the models, except under an exotic combination of non-standard assumptions. Identical results are obtained when repeating the calculation with kinematical measurements available in the literature. We demonstrate that a DM halo would be detected by our method, and therefore the results have no straightforward interpretation. Only the presence of a highly prolate (flattening q>2) DM halo can be reconciled with the observations, but this is highly unlikely in LambdaCDM models. The results challenge the current understanding of the spatial distribution and nature of the Galactic DM. In particular, our results may indicate that any direct DM detection experiment is doomed to fail, if the local density of the target particles is negligible.
  • We show the preliminary analysis of some Galactic stellar clusters (GSCls) candidates and the results of the analysis of two new interesting GSCls found in the "VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea" (VVV) Survey. The VVV photometric data are being used also to improve the knowledge of the Galactic structure. The photometric data are obtained with the new automatic photometric pipeline VVV-SkZ_pipeline.