• Prior to the launch of the Swift mission several X-ray line detections were reported in Gamma Ray Burst afterglow spectra. To date, these pre-Swift era results have not been conclusively confirmed. The most contentious issue in this area is the choice of statistical method used to evaluate the significance of these features. In this paper we compare three different methods already extant in the literature for assessing the significance of possible line features and discuss their relative advantages and disadvantages. The methods are demonstrated by application to observations of 40 bursts from the archive of Swift XRT at early times (< few ks post trigger in the rest frame of the burst). Based on this thorough analysis we found no strong evidence for emission lines. For each of the three methods we have determined detection limits for emission line strengths in bursts with spectral parameters typical of the Swift-era sample. We also discuss the effects of the current calibration status on emission line detection.
  • We report the discovery and subsequent multi-wavelength afterglow behaviour of the high redshift (z = 4.27) Gamma Ray Burst GRB 050505. This burst is the third most distant burst, measured by spectroscopic redshift, discovered after GRB 000131 (z = 4.50) and GRB 050904 (z = 6.29). GRB 050505 is a long GRB with a multipeaked gamma-ray light curve, with a duration of T_90 = 63+/-2 s and an inferred isotropic release in gamma-rays of ~4.44 x 10^53 ergs in the 1-10^4 keV rest frame energy range. The Swift X-Ray Telescope followed the afterglow for 14 days, detecting two breaks in the light curve at 7.4(+/-1.5) ks and 58.0 (+9.9/-15.4) ks after the burst trigger. The power law decay slopes before, between and after these breaks were 0.25 (+0.16/-0.17), 1.17 (+0.08/-0.09) and 1.97 (+0.27/-0.28) respectively. The light curve can also be fit with a `smoothly broken' power law model with a break observed at ~ T+18.5 ks, with decay slopes of ~0.4 and ~1.8 before and after the break respectively. The X-ray afterglow shows no spectral variation over the course of the Swift observations, being well fit with a single power law of photon index ~1.90. This behaviour is expected for the cessation of continued energisation of the ISM shock followed by a break caused by a jet, either uniform or structured. Neither break is consistent with a cooling break. The spectral energy distribution indeed shows the cooling frequency to be below the X-ray but above optical frequencies. The optical -- X-ray spectrum also shows that there is significant X-ray absorption in excess of that due to our Galaxy but very little optical/UV extinction, with E(B-V) ~0.10 for a SMC-like extinction curve.