• We review efforts to realise so-called mermaid (or short-ranged attraction/long ranged repulsion) interactions in 3d real space. The repulsive and attractive contributions to these interactions in charged colloids and colloid-polymer mixtures, may be accurately realised, by comparing particle-resolved studies with colloids to computer simulation. However, when we review work where these interactions have been combined, despite early indications of behaviour consistent with predictions, closer analysis reveals that in the non-aqueous systems used for particle-resolved studies, the idea of summing the attractive and repulsive components leads to wild deviations with experiment. We suggest that the origin lies in the weak ion dissociation in these systems with low dielectric constant solvents. Ultimately this leads even to non-centro-symmetric interactions and a new level of complexity in these systems.
  • We study the joint variability of structural information in a hard sphere fluid biased to avoid crystallisation and form fivefold symmetric geometric motifs. We show that the structural covariance matrix approach, originally proposed for on-lattice liquids [Ronceray and Harrowell, JCP 2016], can be meaningfully employed to understand structural relationships between different motifs and can predict, within the linear-response regime, structural changes related to motifs distinct from that used to bias the system.
  • We propose a novel microfluidic "opposed-flow" geometry in which the continuous fluid phase is fed into a junction in a direction opposite the dispersed phase. This pulls out the dispersed phase into a micron-sized jet, which decays into micron-sized droplets. As the driving pressure is tuned to a critical value, the jet radius vanishes as a power law down to sizes below 1 $\mu$m. By contrast, the conventional "coflowing" junction leads to a first order jetting transition, in which the jet disappears at a finite radius of several $\mu$m, to give way to a "dripping" state, resulting in much larger droplets. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by producing the first microfluidic silicone oil emulsions with a sub micron particle radius, and utilize these droplets to produce colloidal clusters.
  • Crucial to gaining control over crystallisation in multicomponent materials or accurately modelling rheological behaviour of magma flows is to understand the mechanisms by which crystal nuclei form. The microscopic nature of such nuclei, however, makes this extremely hard in experiments, while computer simulations have hitherto been hampered by their short timescales and small system sizes due to limited computational power. Here we use highly-efficient GPU simulation techniques to access system sizes around 100 times larger than previous studies. This makes it possible to elucidate the nucleation mechanism in a well-studied binary glassformer. We discover that the supercooled liquid is inherently unstable for system sizes of 10,000 particles and larger. This effect is due to compositional fluctuations leading to regions comprised of large particles only which rapidly nucleate. We argue that this mechanism provides a minimum rate of crystallisation in mixtures in general, and use our results to stabilise a model binary mixture and predict glassforming ability for the CuZr metallic glassformer.
  • In trajectory space, dynamical heterogeneities in glass-forming liquids correspond to the emergence of a dynamical phase transition between an active phase poor in local structure and an inactive phase which is rich in local structure. We support this scenario with the study of a model additive mixture of Lennard-Jones particles, quantifying how the choice of the relevant structural and dynamical observable affects the transition in trajectory space. We find that the low mobility, structure-rich phase is dominated by icosahedral order. Applying a nonequilibrium rheological protocol, we connect local order to the emergence of mechanical rigidity.
  • We consider the yielding under simple shear of a binary Lennard-Jones glassformer whose super-Arrhenius dynamics are correlated with the formation of icosahedral structures. We recast this glassformer as an effective system of icosahedra [Pinney et al. J. Chem. Phys. 143 244507 (2015)]. Looking at the small-strain region of sheared simulations, we observe that shear rates affect the shear localisation behavior particularly at temperatures below the glass transition as defined with a fit to the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation. At higher temperature, shear localisation starts immediately upon shearing for all shear rates. At lower temperatures, faster shear rates can result in a delayed start in shear localisation; which begins close to the yield stress. Building from a previous work which considered steady-state shear [Pinney et al. J. Chem. Phys. 143 244507 (2016)], we interpret the response to shear and the shear localisation in terms of a \emph{local} effective temperature with our system of icosahedra. We find that the effective temperatures of the regions undergoing shear localisation increase significantly with increasing strain (before reaching a steady state plateau).
  • A quasi two-dimensional colloidal suspension is studied under the influence of immobilisation (pinning) of a random fraction of its particles. We introduce a novel experimental method to perform random pinning and, with the support of numerical simulation, we find that increasing the pinning concentration smoothly arrests the system, with a cross-over from a regime of high mobility and high entropy to a regime of low mobility and low entropy. At the local level, we study fluctuations in area fraction and concentration of pins and map them to entropic structural signatures and local mobility, obtaining a measure for the local entropic fluctuations of the experimental system.
  • We combine experiments and simulations to study the link between criticality and gelation in sticky spheres. We employ confocal microscopy to image colloid-polymer mixtures, and Monte Carlo simulations of the square-well (SW) potential as a reference model. To this end, we map our experimental samples onto the SW model. We find excellent structural agreement between experiments and simulations, both for locally favored structures at the single particle level and large-scale fluctuations at criticality. We follow in detail the rapid structural change of the critical fluid when approaching the gas-liquid binodal and highlight the role of critical density fluctuations for this structural crossover. Our results link the arrested spinodal decomposition to long-lived energetically favored structures, which grow even away from the binodal due to the critical scaling of the bulk correlation length and static susceptibility.
  • Understanding the phase behaviour of mixtures continues to pose challenges, even for systems that might be considered "simple". Here we consider a very simple mixture of two colloidal and one non-adsorbing polymer species which can be simplified even further to a size-asymmetrical binary mixture, in which the effective colloid-colloid interactions depend on the polymer concentration. We show that this basic system exhibits surprisingly rich phase behaviour. In particular, we enquire whether such a system features only a liquid-vapor phase separation (as in one-component colloid-polymer mixtures) or whether, additionally, liquid-liquid demixing of two colloidal phases can occur. Particle-resolved experiments show demixing-like behaviour, but when combined with bespoke Monte Carlo simulations, this proves illusory, and we reveal that only a single liquid-vapor transition occurs. Progressive migration of the small particles to the liquid phase as the polymer concentration increases gives rise to composition inversion - a maximum in the large particle concentration in the liquid phase. Near criticality the density fluctuations are found to be dominated by the larger colloids.
  • Whether the glass transition is caused by an underlying singularity or is a purely kinetic phenomenon is a significant outstanding question. Studying an atomistic glass former, we introduce a sampling method to access temperatures corresponding to dynamical regimes usually hard to reach with computer simulation. We find a peak in the specific heat, which we interpret as a drop in the density of states. We further present evidence of a liquid-liquid transition to a state rich in locally favoured structures related to a recently discovered dynamical phase transition.
  • Tackling the low-temperature fate of supercooled liquids is challenging due to the immense timescales involved, which prevent equilibration and lead to the operational glass transition. Relating glassy behaviour to an underlying, thermodynamic phase transition is a long-standing open question in condensed matter physics. Like experiments, computer simulations are limited by the small time window over which a liquid can be equilibrated. Here we address the challenge of low temperature equilibration using trajectory sampling in a system undergoing a nonequilibrium phase transition. This transition occurs in trajectory space between the normal supercooled liquid and a glassy state rich in low-energy geometric motifs. Our results indicate that this transition might become accessible in equilibrium configurational space at a temperature close to the so-called Kauzmann temperature, and provide a possible route to unify dynamical and thermodynamical theories of the glass transition.
  • Among the key insights into the glass transition has been the identification of a non-equilibrium phase transition in trajectory space which reveals phase coexistence between the normal supercooled liquid (active phase) and a glassy state (inactive phase). Here we present evidence that such a transition occurs in experiment. In colloidal hard spheres we find a non-Gaussian distribution of trajectories leaning towards those rich in locally favoured structures (LFS), associated with the emergence of slow dynamics. This we interpret as evidence for an non-equilibrium transition to an inactive LFS-rich phase. Reweighting trajectories reveals a first-order phase transition in trajectory space between a normal liquid and a LFS-rich phase. We further find evidence of a purely dynamical transition in trajectory space.
  • Geometric frustration describes the inability of a local molecular arrangement, such as icosahedra found in metallic glasses and in model atomic glass-formers, to tile space. Local icosahedral order however is strongly frustrated in Euclidean space, which obscures any causal relationship with the observed dynamical slowdown. Here we relieve frustration in a model glass-forming liquid by curving 3-dimensional space onto the surface of a 4-dimensional hypersphere. For sufficient curvature, frustration vanishes and the liquid freezes in a fully icosahedral structure via a sharp `transition'. Frustration increases upon reducing the curvature, and the transition to the icosahedral state smoothens while glassy dynamics emerges. Decreasing the curvature leads to decoupling between dynamical and structural length scales and the decrease of kinetic fragility. This sheds light on the observed glass-forming behavior in the Euclidean space.
  • We consider a model of self-propelled dynamics for athermal active particles, where the non-equilibrium active forces are modelled by a Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. In the limit of no-driving force, the model reduces to the passive, Brownian dynamics of an atomistic glass forming fluid, the Wahnstr\"om binary mixture. The Wahnstr\"om mixture is known to show strong correlations between the emergence of slow dynamics and the formation of locally favoured structures based on icosahedra. Here, we study how the non-equilibrium forces affect the local structure of the system, and find that these strongly promote icosahedral order. The phases rich in local icosahedral order correspond to configurations of very low potential energy, suggesting that the non-equilibrium dynamics in the self propelled model can be effectively exploited to explore the potential energy surface of the binary mixture and have access to states that are difficult to attain using passive dynamics.
  • We consider the sedimentation of a colloidal gel under confinement in the direction of gravity. The confinement allows us to compare directly experiments and computer simulations, for the same system size in the vertical direction. The confinement also leads to qualitatively different behaviour compared to bulk systems: in large systems gelation suppresses sedimentation, but for small systems sedimentation is enhanced relative to non-gelling suspensions, although the rate of sedimentation is reduced when the strength of the attraction between the colloids is strong. We map interaction parameters between a model experimental system (observed in real space) and computer simulations. Remarkably, we find that when simulating the system using Brownian dynamics in which hydrodynamic interactions between the particles are neglected, we find that sedimentation occurs on the same timescale as the experiments, however the thickness of the "arms" of the gel is rather larger in the experiments, compared with the simulations. An analysis of local structure in the simulations showed similar behaviour to gelation in the absence of gravity.
  • We consider a binary Lennard-Jones glassformer whose super-Arrhenius dynamics are correlated with the formation of particles organized into icosahedra under simple steady state shear. We recast this glassformer as an effective system of icosahedra [Pinney et al. J. Chem. Phys. 143 244507 (2015)]. From the observed population of icosahedra in each steady state, we obtain an effective temperature which is linearly dependent on the shear rate in the range considered. Upon shear banding, the system separates into a region of high shear rate and a region of low shear rate. The effective temperatures obtained in each case show that the low shear regions correspond to a significantly lower temperature than the high shear regions. Taking a weighted average of the effective temperature of these regions (weight determined by region size) yields an estimate of the effective temperature which compares well with an effective temperature based on the global mesocluster population of the whole system.
  • We investigate the static and dynamic properties of a weakly polydisperse hard sphere system in the deeply supercooled state, i.e. at densities higher than that corresponding to the mode-coupling transition. The structural analysis reveals the emergence of icosahedral locally favoured structures, previously only found in trace quantities. We present a new approach to probe the shape of dynamically heterogeneous regions, which is insensitive to particle packing effects that can hamper such analysis. Our results indicate that the shape of the dynamically heterogeneous regions changes only weakly and moreover hint that the often-used four-point correlation length may exhibit a growth in excess of that which our method identifies. The growth of the size of the dynamically heterogeneous regions appears instead to be in line with the one of structural and dynamic propensity correlations.
  • We have developed Norland Optical Adhesive (NOA) flow focusing devices, making use of the excellent solvent compatibility and surface properties of NOA to generate micron scale oil-in-water emulsions with polydispersities as low as 5%. While current work on microfluidic oil-in-water emulsification largely concerns the production of droplets with sizes on the order of 10s of micrometres, large enough that Brownian motion is negligible, our NOA devices can produce droplets with radii ranging from 2 {\mu}m to 12 {\mu}m. To demonstrate the utility of these emulsions as colloidal model systems we produce fluorescently labelled polydimethylsiloxane droplets suitable for particle resolved studies with confocal microscopy. We analyse the structure of the resulting emulsion in 3D using coordinate tracking and the topological cluster classification and reveal a new mono-disperse thermal system.
  • The formation of colloidal gels is strongly dependent on the volume fraction of the system and the strength of the interactions between the colloids. Here we explore very dilute solutions by the means of numerical simulations, and show that, in the absence of hydrodynamic interactions and for sufficiently strong interactions, percolating colloidal gels can be realised at very low values of the volume fraction. Characterising the structure of the network of the arrested material we find that, when reducing the volume fraction, the gels are dominated by low-energy local structures, analogous to the isolated clusters of the interaction potential. Changing the strength of the interaction allows us to tune the compactness of the gel as characterised by the fractal dimension, with low interaction strength favouring more chain-like structures.
  • We investigate the effects of the reversal of the gravitational field onto a sedimented and partially crystallised suspension of nearly-hard sphere colloids. We analyse the structural changes that take place during the melting of the crystalline regions and the reorganisation and assembly of the sedimenting particles. Through a comparison with numerical simulation, we access the single-particle kinetics and identify the key structural mechanism in the competition between five-fold symmetric and cubic crystalline structures. With the use of a coarse-grained, discrete model, we reproduce the kinetic network of reactions underpinning crystallisation and highlight the main microscopic transitions.
  • For binary fluid mixtures of spherical particles in which the two species are sufficiently different in size, the dominant wavelength of oscillations of the pair correlation functions is predicted to change from roughly the diameter of the large species to that of the small species along a sharp crossover line in the phase diagram [C. Grodon, M. Dijkstra, R. Evans & R. Roth, J.Chem.Phys. 121, 7869 (2004)]. Using particle-resolved colloid experiments in 3d we demonstrate that crossover exists and that its location in the phase diagram is in quantitative agreement with the results of both theory and our Monte-Carlo simulations. In contrast with previous work [J. Baumgartl, R. Dullens, M. Dijkstra, R. Roth & C. Bechinger, Phys.Rev.Lett. 98, 198303 (2007)], where a correspondence was drawn between crossover and percolation of both species, in our 3d study we find that structural crossover is unrelated to percolation.
  • We consider a binary Lennard-Jones glassformer whose super-Arrhenius dynamics are correlated with the formation of icosahedral structures. Upon cooling these icosahedra organize into mesoclusters. We recast this glassformer as an effective system of icosahedra which we describe with a population dynamics model. This model we parameterize with data from the temperature regime accessible to molecular dynamics simulations. We then use the model to determine the population of icosahedra in mesoclusters at arbitrary temperature. Using simulation data to incorporate dynamics into the model we predict relaxation behavior at temperatures inaccessible to conventional approaches. Our model predicts super-Arrhenius dynamics whose relaxation time remains finite for non-zero temperature.
  • Colloidal gels are out-of-equilibrium structures, made up of a rarefied network of colloidal particles. Comparing experiments to numerical simulations, with hydrodynamic interactions switched off, we demonstrate the crucial role of the solvent for gelation. Hydrodynamic interactions suppress the formation of larger local equilibrium structures of closed geometry, and instead lead to the formation of highly anisotropic threads, which promote an open gel network. We confirm these results with simulations which include hydrodynamics. Based on three-point correlations, we propose a scale-resolved quantitative measure for the anisotropy of the gel structure. We find a strong discrepancy for interparticle distances just under twice the particle diameter between systems with and without hydrodynamics, quantifying the role of hydrodynamics from a structural point of view.
  • Geometric frustration is an approach to the glass transition based upon the consideration of locally favoured structures (LFS), which are geometric motifs which minimise the local free energy. Geometric frustration proposes that a transition to a crystalline state is frustrated because these LFS do not tile space. However, this concept is based on icosahedra which are not always the LFS for a given system. The LFS of the popular Kob-Andersen (KA) model glassformer is the bicapped square antiprism, which does tile space. Such an LFS-crystal is indeed realised in the $\mathrm{Al_{2}Cu}$ structure, which is predicted to be a low energy state for the KA model with a 2:1 composition. We therefore hypothesise that upon changing the composition in the KA model towards 2:1, geometric frustration may be progressively relieved, leading to larger and larger domains of LFS which would ultimately correspond to the $\mathrm{Al_{2}Cu}$ crystal. Remarkably, rather than an increase, upon changing composition we find a small decrease in the LFS population, and the system remains impervious to nucleation of LFS crystals. We suggest that this may be related to the composition of the LFS, as only a limited subset are compatible with the crystal. We further demonstrate that the $\mathrm{Al_{2}Cu}$ crystal will grow from a seed in the KA model with 2:1 composition and identify the melting temperature to be 0.447(2).
  • Amorphous solids, or glasses, are distinguished from crystalline solids by their lack of long-range structural order. At the level of two-body structural correlations, glassformers show no qualitative change upon vitrifying from a supercooled liquid. Nonetheless the dynamical properties of a glass are so much slower that it appears to take on the properties of a solid. While many theories of the glass transition focus on dynamical quantities, a solid's resistance to flow is often viewed as a consequence of its structure. Here we address the viewpoint that this remains the case for a glass. Recent developments using higher-order measures show a clear emergence of structure upon dynamical arrest in a variety of glass formers and offer the tantalising hope of a structural mechanism for arrest. However a rigorous fundamental identification of such a causal link between structure and arrest remains elusive. We undertake a critical survey of this work in experiments, computer simulation and theory and discuss what might strengthen the link between structure and dynamical arrest. We move on to highlight the relationship between crystallisation and glass-forming ability made possible by this deeper understanding of the structure of the liquid state, and emphasize the potential to design materials with optimal glassforming and crystallisation ability, for applications such as phase-change memory. We then consider aspects of the phenomenology of glassy systems where structural measures have yet to make a large impact, such as polyamorphism (the existence of multiple liquid states), aging (the time-evolution of non-equilibrium materials below their glass transition) and the response of glassy materials to external fields such as shear.