• Since the invention of the bolometer, its main design principles relied on efficient light absorption into a low-heat-capacity material and its exceptional thermal isolation from the environment. While the reduced thermal coupling to its surroundings allows for an enhanced thermal response, it in turn strongly reduces the thermal time constant and dramatically lowers the detector's bandwidth. With its unique combination of a record small electronic heat capacity and a weak electron-phonon coupling, graphene has emerged as an extreme bolometric medium that allows for both, high sensitivity and high bandwidths. Here, we introduce a hot-electron bolometer based on a novel Johnson noise readout of the electron gas in graphene, which is critically coupled to incident radiation through a photonic nanocavity. This proof-of-concept operates in the telecom spectrum, achieves an enhanced bolometric response at charge neutrality with a noise equivalent power NEP < 5pW/ Sqrt(Hz), a thermal relaxation time of {\tau} < 34ps, an improved light absorption by a factor ~3, and an operation temperature up to T=300K.
  • We propose to measure the photo-production cross section of $J/{\psi}$ near threshold, in search of the recently observed LHCb hidden-charm resonances $P_c$(4380) and $P_c$(4450) consistent with 'pentaquarks'. The observation of these resonances in photo-production will provide strong evidence of the true resonance nature of the LHCb states, distinguishing them from kinematic enhancements. A bremsstrahlung photon beam produced with an 11 GeV electron beam at CEBAF covers the energy range of $J/{\psi}$ production from the threshold photo-production energy of 8.2 GeV, to an energy beyond the presumed $P_c$(4450) resonance. The experiment will be carried out in Hall C at Jefferson Lab using a 50{\mu}A electron beam incident on a 9% copper radiator. The resulting photon beam passes through a 15 cm liquid hydrogen target, producing $J/{\psi}$ mesons through a diffractive process in the $t$-channel, or through a resonant process in the $s$- and $u$-channel. The decay $e^+e^-$ pair of the $J/{\psi}$ will be detected in coincidence using the two high-momentum spectrometers of Hall C. The spectrometer settings have been optimized to distinguish the resonant $s$- and $u$-channel production from the diffractive $t$-channel $J/{\psi}$ production. The $s$- and $u$-channel production of the charmed 5-quark resonance dominates the $t$-distribution at large $t$. The momentum and angular resolution of the spectrometers is sufficient to observe a clear resonance enhancement in the total cross section and $t$-distribution. We request a total of 11 days of beam time with 9 days to carry the main experiment and 2 days to acquire the needed $t$-channel elastic $J/{\psi}$ production data for a calibration measurement. This calibration measurement in itself will greatly enhance our knowledge of $t$-channel elastic $J/{\psi}$ production near threshold.
  • Pressure dependence of longitudinal relaxation time (T$_1$) due to the cell wall was observed previously at both room temperature and low temperature in valved Rb-coated refillable $^3$He gaseous cells in \cite{Zheng2}. The diffusion of $^3$He from measurement cell through a capillary tube to the valve and the subsequent depolarization on the surface of the valve was proposed to possibly explain such a pressure dependence at room temperature \cite{Saam}. In this paper, we investigate this diffusion effect through measurements of T$_1$ with newly designed Rb-coated Pyrex glass cells at 295 K as well as finite element analysis (FEA) studies. Both the experimental results and FEA studies show that the diffusion effect is insufficient to explain the observed linear pressure-dependent behavior of T$_1$.
  • A series of five unusual slow glitches of the radio pulsar B1822-09 (PSR J1825-0935) were observed over the 1995-2005 interval. This phenomenon is understood in a solid quark star model, where the reasonable parameters for slow glitches are presented in the paper. It is proposed that, because of increasing shear stress as a pulsar spins down, a slow glitch may occur, beginning with a collapse of a superficial layer of the quark star. This layer of material turns equivalently to viscous fluid at first, the viscosity of which helps deplete the energy released from both the accumulated elastic energy and the gravitation potential. This performs then a process of slow glitch. Numerical calculations show that the observed slow glitches could be reproduced if the effective coefficient of viscosity is ~10^2 cm^{2}/s and the initial velocity of the superficial layer is order of 10^{-10} cm/s in the coordinate rotating frame of the star.
  • Hubble Space Telescope observations of the gravitational lens PG 1115+080 in the infrared show the known z =0.310 lens galaxy and reveal the z = 1.722 quasar host galaxy. The main lens galaxy G is a nearly circular (ellipticity < 0.07) elliptical galaxy with a de Vaucouleurs profile and an effective radius of R_e = 0.59 +/- 0.06 arcsec (1.7 +/- 0.2 h^{-1} kpc for Omega = 1 and h = H_0/100 km/s/Mpc). G is part of a group of galaxies that is a required component of all successful lens models. The new quasar and lens positions (3 milliarcsecond errors) yield constraints for these models that are statistically degenerate, but several conclusions are firmly established. (1) The principal lens galaxy is an elliptical galaxy with normal structural properties, lying close to the fundamental plane for its redshift. (2) The potential of the main lens galaxy is nearly round, even when not constrained by the small ellipticity of the light of this galaxy. (3) All models involving two mass distributions place the group component near the luminosity-weighted centroid of the brightest nearby group members. (4) All models predict a time delay ratio r_{ABC} = 1.3. (5) Our lens models predict H_0 = 44 +/- 4 km/s/Mpc if the lens galaxy contains dark matter and has a flat rotation curve, and H_0 = 65 +/- 5 km/s/Mpc if it has a constant mass-to-light ratio. (6) Any dark halo of the main lens galaxy must be truncated near 1.5 arcsec (4 h^{-1} kpc) before the inferred Ho rises above 60 km/s/Mpc. (7) The quasar host galaxy is lensed into an Einstein ring connecting the four quasar images, whose shape is reproduced by the models. Improved NICMOS imaging of the ring could be used to break the degeneracy of the lens models.