• We compare the noise in interferometric measurements of the Vela pulsar from ground- and space-based antennas with theoretical predictions. The noise depends on both the flux density and the interferometric phase of the source. Because the Vela pulsar is bright and scintillating, these comparisons extend into both the low and high signal-to-noise regimes. Furthermore, our diversity of baselines explores the full range of variation in interferometric phase. We find excellent agreement between theoretical expectations and our estimates of noise among samples within the characteristic scintillation scales. Namely, the noise is drawn from an elliptical Gaussian distribution in the complex plane, centered on the signal. The major axis, aligned with the signal phase, varies quadratically with the signal, while the minor axis, at quadrature, varies with the same linear coefficients. For weak signal, the noise approaches a circular Gaussian distribution. Both the variance and covariance of the noise are also affected by artifacts of digitization and correlation. In particular, we show that gating introduces correlations between nearby spectral channels.
  • We present measurements of the linear diameter of the emission region of the Vela pulsar at observing wavelength lambda=18 cm. We infer the diameter as a function of pulse phase from the distribution of visibility on the Mopra-Tidbinbilla baseline. As we demonstrate, in the presence of strong scintillation, finite size of the emission region produces a characteristic W-shaped signature in the projection of the visibility distribution onto the real axis. This modification involves heightened probability density near the mean amplitude, decreased probability to either side, and a return to the zero-size distribution beyond. We observe this signature with high statistical significance, as compared with the best-fitting zero-size model, in many regions of pulse phase. We find that the equivalent full width at half maximum of the pulsar's emission region decreases from more than 400 km early in the pulse to near zero at the peak of the pulse, and then increases again to approximately 800 km near the trailing edge. We discuss possible systematic effects, and compare our work with previous results.