• We use hydrodynamical simulations of a Cartwheel-like ring galaxy, modelled as a nearly head-on collision of a small companion with a larger disc galaxy, to probe the evolution of the gaseous structures and flows, and to explore the physical conditions setting the star formation activity. Star formation is first quenched by tides as the companion approaches, before being enhanced shortly after the collision. The ring ploughs the disc material as it radially extends, and almost simultaneously depletes its stellar and gaseous reservoir into the central region, through the spokes, and finally dissolve 200 Myr after the collision. Most of star formation first occurs in the ring before this activity is transferred to the spokes and then the nucleus. We thus propose that the location of star formation traces the dynamical stage of ring galaxies, and could help constrain their star formation histories. The ring hosts tidal compression associated with strong turbulence. This compression yields an azimuthal asymmetry, with maxima reached in the side furthest away from the nucleus, which matches the star formation activity distribution in our models and in observed ring systems. The interaction triggers the formation of star clusters significantly more massive than before the collision, but less numerous than in more classical galaxy interactions. The peculiar geometry of Cartwheel-like objects thus yields a star (cluster) formation activity comparable to other interacting objects, but with notable second order differences in the nature of turbulence, the enhancement of the star formation rate, and the number of massive clusters formed.
  • Galaxy mergers are believed to trigger strong starbursts. This is well assessed by observations in the local Universe. However the efficiency of this mechanism has poorly been tested so far for high redshift, actively star forming, galaxies. We present a suite of pc-resolution hydrodynamical numerical simulations to compare the star formation process along a merging sequence of high and low z galaxies, by varying the gas mass fraction between the two models. We show that, for the same orbit, high-redshift gas-rich mergers are less efficient than low-redshift ones at producing starbursts: the star formation rate excess induced by the merger and its duration are both around 10 times lower than in the low gas fraction case. The mechanisms that account for the star formation triggering at low redshift - the increased compressive turbulence, gas fragmentation, and central gas inflows - are only mildly, if not at all, enhanced for high gas fraction galaxy encounters. Furthermore, we show that the strong stellar feedback from the initially high star formation rate in high redshift galaxies does not prevent an increase of the star formation during the merger. Our results are consistent with the observed increase of the number of major mergers with increasing redshift being faster than the respective increase in the number of starburst galaxies.
  • We present the first Herschel spectroscopic detections of the [OI]63 and [CII]158 micron fine-structure transitions, and a single para-H2O line from the 35 x 15 kpc^2 shocked intergalactic filament in Stephan's Quintet. The filament is believed to have been formed when a high-speed intruder to the group collided with clumpy intergroup gas. Observations with the PACS spectrometer provide evidence for broad (> 1000 km s^-1) luminous [CII] line profiles, as well as fainter [OI]63micron emission. SPIRE FTS observations reveal water emission from the p-H2O (111-000) transition at several positions in the filament, but no other molecular lines. The H2O line is narrow, and may be associated with denser intermediate-velocity gas experiencing the strongest shock-heating. The [CII]/PAH{tot) and [CII]/FIR ratios are too large to be explained by normal photo-electric heating in PDRs. HII region excitation or X-ray/Cosmic Ray heating can also be ruled out. The observations lead to the conclusion that a large fraction the molecular gas is diffuse and warm. We propose that the [CII], [OI] and warm H2 line emission is powered by a turbulent cascade in which kinetic energy from the galaxy collision with the IGM is dissipated to small scales and low-velocities, via shocks and turbulent eddies. Low-velocity magnetic shocks can help explain both the [CII]/[OI] ratio, and the relatively high [CII]/H2 ratios observed. The discovery that [CII] emission can be enhanced, in large-scale turbulent regions in collisional environments has implications for the interpretation of [CII] emission in high-z galaxies.
  • We compare Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph observations of SQ-A & SQ-B in Stephan's Quintet, Ambartzumian's knot in Arp 105, Arp 242-N3, Arp 87-N1, a bridge star forming region, NGC 5291 N and NGC 5291 S. The PAHs tend to be mainly neutral grains with a typical size of 50 - 100 carbon atoms. The interstellar radiation field is harder than typical starburst galaxies, being similar to that found in dwarf galaxies. The neon line ratios are consistent with a recent episode of star formation. We detect warm H2 in SQ-A, Arp 87N1 and SQ-B. Using our 8 um images of 14 interacting systems we identify 62 tidal star forming knots (TSFKs). The estimated stellar masses range from super star cluster (10^4-10^6 Msun) to TDG (~10^9 Msun) sizes. The stellar mass, with some scatter, scales with the 8 um luminosity and tends to be an order of magnitude smaller than the KISS sample of star forming dwarfs. An exception to this are the more massive TSFKs in Arp 242. The TSFKs, form two distinct clumps in a mid-infrared color diagram. There are 38 red-TSFKs with [4.5] - [8.0] > 3 and [3.6] - [4.5] < 0.4. This populations has significantly enhanced non-stellar emission, most likely due to PAHs and/or hot dust. The second group of 21 sources has 1.2 < [4.5] - [8.0] < 3 and [3.6] - [4.5] < 0.4, these colors are similar to star forming dwarf and spiral galaxies. The redder [4.5] - [8.0] population tends to have the sources with a rising 8-24 um SED while the blue population tends to contain the sources with a descending SED. The rising SED is typical of spiral and starburst galaxies with a dominant 40 - 60 K dust component and the declining SED probably indicates a dominant hot dust component.
  • Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDG), concentrations of interstellar gas and stars in the tidal features of interacting galaxies, have been the subject of much scrutiny. The `smoking gun' that will prove the TDG hypothesis is the discovery of independent dwarf galaxies that are detached from other galaxies, but have clear tidal histories. As part of a search for TDGs we are using GALEX to conduct a large UV imaging survey of interacting galaxies selected from the Arp Atlas. As part of that study, we present a GALEX UV and SDSS and SARA optical study of the gas-rich interacting galaxy pair Arp 305. The GALEX UV data reveal much extended diffuse UV emission and star formation outside the disks including a candidate TDG between the two galaxies. We have used a smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model the interaction and determine the fate of the candidate TDG.
  • We present an empirical assessment of the use of broadband optical colours as age indicators for unresolved extragalactic clusters and investigate stochastic sampling effects on integrated colours. We use the integrated properties of Galactic open clusters as models for unresolved extragalactic clusters. The population synthesis code Starburst99 (Leitherer et al. 1999) and four optical colours were used to estimate how well we can recover the ages of 62 well-studied Galactic open clusters with published ages. We provide a method for estimating the ages of unresolved clusters and for reliably determining the uncertainties in the age estimates. Our results support earlier conclusions based on comparisons to synthetic clusters, namely the (U-B) colour is critical to the estimation of the ages of star forming regions. We compare the observed optical colours with those obtained from Starburst99 using the published ages and get good agreement. The scatter in the (B-V)_observed-(B-V)_model is larger for lower luminosity clusters, perhaps due to stochastic effects.
  • To help understand the effects of galaxy interactions on star formation, we analyze Spitzer infrared and GALEX ultraviolet images of the interacting galaxy pair Arp 82 (NGC 2535/6), and compare to a numerical simulation of the interaction. We investigate the UV and IR properties of several star forming regions (clumps). Using the FUV/NUV colors of the clumps we constrain the ages. The 8 micron and 24 micron luminosities are used to estimate the far-infrared luminosities and the star formation rates of the clumps. We investigate possible gradients in the UV and IR colors. See Smith et al. (2006a,b) for global results on our entire interacting sample.
  • We present the first results from the COLA (Compact Objects in Low-power AGN) project which aims to determine the relationship between one facet of AGN activity, the compact radio core, with star formation in the circumnuclear region of the host galaxy. This will be accomplished by the comparison of the multi-wavelength properties of a sample of AGN with compact radio cores to those of a sample of AGN without compact cores and a matched sample of galaxies without AGN. In this paper we discuss the selection criteria for our galaxy samples and present the initial radio observations of the 107 Southern galaxies in our sample. Low-resolution ATCA observations at 4.8, 2.5 and 1.4 GHz and high resolution, single baseline snapshots at 2.3 GHz with the Australian LBA are presented. We find that for the majority of the galaxies in our sample, the radio luminosity is correlated with the FIR luminosity. Compact radio cores are detected in 9 galaxies. The majority (8/9) of these galaxies exhibit a significant radio excess and 50% (7/14) of the galaxies which lie above the radio-FIR correlation by more than 1 sigma have compact radio cores. The emission from the cores is too weak to account for this radio excess and there is no evidence that the radio luminosity of the compact cores is correlated with the FIR galaxy luminosity. The galaxies with compact cores tend to be classified optically as AGN, with two thirds (6/9) exhibiting Seyfert-like optical emission line ratios, and the remaining galaxies classified either as composite objects (2/9) or starburst (1/9). (Abridged)
  • We present VLA observations of the distribution and kinematics of the HI gas in the classical ring galaxy VIIZw466 and its immediate surroundings. The HI gas corresponding to the bright optical star forming ring exhibits the typical profile of a rotating-expanding ring. The systemic velocity of the galaxy is found to be 14,468km/s. A formal fit to the HI kinematics in the ring is consistent with both ring rotation and expansion (expansion velocity 32 km/s). However, H\,I in the northeast quadrant of the ring is severely disturbed, showing evidence of tidal interaction. We also detect a hydrogen plume from the southern edge-on companion galaxy (G2) pointing towards the ring galaxy. This, and other peculiarities associated with G2 suggest that it is the intruder galaxy which recently collided with VIIZw466 and formed the ring. Numerical hydrodynamic models are presented which show that most of the observed features can be accounted for as a result of the impact splash between two gas disks. The resultant debris is stretched by ring wave motion in the bridge and later forms accretion streams onto the two galaxies.Finally, we detect HI emission from two previously unknown dwarf galaxies located northeast and southeast of VIIZw466 respectively. This brings the total number of members of the VIIZw466 group to five. Using the projected mass method, the upper limit of the dynamical mass of the group was estimated to be Mo =3.5x10^{12} M_sun, which implies that the mass to light ratio of the group is (M/L)_{group} \approx$ 70. This rather low value of M/L, as compared with other loose groups, suggests the group may be in a state of collapse at the present time. Plunging orbits would naturally lead to an enhanced probability of head-on collisions and ring galaxy formation.