• The Polarized Instrument for Long-wavelengthObservation of the Tenuous interstellar medium (PILOT) is a balloon-borne experiment aiming at measuring the polarized emission of thermal dust at a wavelength of 240 mm(1.2 THz). A first PILOT flight (flight#1) of the experiment took place from Timmins, Ontario, Canada, in September 2015 and a second flight (flight#2) took place from Alice Springs, Australia in april 2017. In this paper, we present the inflight performance of the instrument during these two flights. We concentrate on performances during flight#2, but allude to flight#1 performances if significantly different.We first present a short description of the instrument and the flights. We determine the time constants of our detectors combining inflight information from the signal decay following high energy particle impacts (glitches) and of our internal calibration source. We use these time constants to deconvolve the data timelines and analyse the optical quality of the instrument as measured on planets. We then analyse the structure and polarization of the instrumental background. We measure the detector response flat field and its time variations using the signal from the residual atmosphere and of our internal calibration source. Finally, we analyze the detector noise spectral and temporal properties. The in-flight performances are found to be satisfactory and globally in line with expectations from ground calibrations. We conclude by assessing the expected in-flight sensitivity of the instrument in light of the above in-flight performances.
  • The Herschel survey of the Galactic Plane (Hi-GAL) provides a unique opportunity to study star formation over large areas of the sky and different environments in the Milky Way. We use the best studied Hi-GAL fields to date, two 2x2 tiles centered on (l, b) = (30, 0) deg and (l, b) = (59, 0) deg, to study the star formation activity using a large sample of well selected young stellar objects (YSOs). We estimate the star formation rate (SFR) for these fields using the number of candidate YSOs and their average time scale to reach the Zero Age Main Sequence, and compare it with the rate estimated using their integrated luminosity at 70 micron combined with an extragalactic star formation indicator. We measure a SFR of (9.5 +- 4.3)*10^{-4} Msol/yr and (1.6 +- 0.7)*10^{-4} Msol/yr with the source counting method, in l=30 deg and l=59 deg, respectively. Results with the 70 micron estimator are (2.4 +- 0.4)*10^{-4} Msol/yr and (2.6 +- 1.1)*10^{-6} Msol/yr. Since the 70 micron indicator is derived from averaging extragalactic star forming complexes, we perform an extrapolation of these values to the whole Milky Way and obtain SFR_{MW} = (0.71 +- 0.13) Msol/yr from l = 30 deg and SFR_{MW} = (0.10 +- 0.04) Msol/yr from l=59 deg. The estimates in l=30 deg are in agreement with the most recent results on the Galactic star formation activity, indicating that the characteristics of this field are likely close to those of the star-formation dominated galaxies used for its derivation. Since the sky coverage is limited, this analysis will improve when the full Hi-GAL survey will be available.