• PSR J1747-2958 is a young (tau=26 kyr), energetic (Edot=2.5x10^36 erg/s) supersonic pulsar at an estimated distance d=5 kpc. It powers the Mouse pulsar wind nebula (PWN; G359.23-0.82), which consists of a pulsar tail spanning 12' in radio and 45" in X-rays. We present the results of our analysis of Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS and HRC observations of the pulsar and its X-ray nebula, as well as an analysis of archival lower-frequency data. The HRC image reveals a point-like source at the pulsar position, $\approx$1" from the bow shock apex of the PWN. The deep ACIS image and radio/gamma-ray pulse profiles indicate that the compact nebula is composed of a flattened equatorial outflow deformed by the ram pressure, and that the angle between the pulsar's spin axis and the line of sight is about $70^\circ$, while the magnetic dipole axis is inclined to the spin axis by about the same angle. The spatially-resolved spectral map of the X-ray tail shows that the photon index of the power-law (PL) spectrum increases from Gamma=1.65$\pm$0.02 to 3.0$\pm$0.1 over the 45" extent, while the spatially-averaged spectrum of the X-ray tail fits a single absorbed PL with Gamma=2.09$\pm$0.03. We detected the Mouse PWN in 150 MHz GMRT data and found evidence of its detection in 24 ${\rm \mu}$m Spitzer data. The radio and infrared data suggest that, at low frequencies, the spectrum of the X-ray-emitting region of the tail can be described by a broken PL with at least one spectral turnover between radio and X-ray frequencies. Using the multiwavelength data, we estimated a magnetic field $B\sim200$ ${\rm \mu G}$ in the tail (which is consistent with the rapid synchrotron cooling observed) and a bulk flow speed $v\sim4000$ km/s. Together, the estimates also suggest the particle acceleration mechanism produces a broad electron SED, spanning $\gtrsim5$ orders of magnitude.
  • We have investigated the mode-changing properties of PSR B0329+54 using 31 epochs of simultaneous 13 cm/3 cm single-pulse observations obtained with Shanghai Tian Ma 65 m telescope. The pulsar was found in the abnormal emission mode 17 times, accounting for ~13% of the 41.6 hours total observation time. Single pulse analyses indicate that mode changes took place simultaneously at 13 cm/3 cm within a few rotational periods. We detected occasional bright and narrow pulses whose peak flux densities were 10 times higher than that of the integrated profile in both bands. At 3 cm, about 0.66% and 0.27% of single pulses were bright in the normal mode and abnormal mode respectively, but at 13 cm the occurrence rate was only about 0.007%. We divided the pulsar radiation window into three components (C1, C2 and C3) corresponding to the main peaks of the integrated profile. The bright pulses preferentially occurred at pulse phases corresponding to the peaks of C2 and C3. Fluctuation spectra showed that C2 had excess red noise in the normal mode, but broad quasi-periodic features with central frequencies around 0.12 cycles/period in the abnormal mode. At 3 cm, C3 had a stronger quasi-periodic modulation centered around 0.06 cycles/period in the abnormal mode. Although there were some asymmetries in the two-dimensional fluctuation spectra, we found no clear evidence for systematic subpulse drifting. Consistent with previous low-frequency observations, we found a very low nulling probability for B0329+54 with upper limits of 0.13% and 1.68% at 13 cm/3 cm respectively.
  • We report a systematic analysis of the spin, orbital, and superorbital modulations of 4U 0114+650, a high-mass X-ray binary consists of one of the slowest spinning neutron stars. Utilizing the dynamic power spectrum, we found that the spin period varied dramatically and anti-correlated with the long-term X-ray flux variation that can be observed using RXTE ASM, Swift BAT, and MAXI. The spin-up rate over the entire dataset is consistent with previously reported values; however, the local spin-up rate is considerably higher. The corresponding local spin-up timescale is comparable to the local spin-up rate of OAO 1657-415, indicating that 4U 0114+650 could also have a transient disk. Moreover, the spin period evolution shows two ~1000-day spin-down/random-walk epochs that appeared together with depressions of the superorbital modulation amplitude. This implies that the superorbital modulation was closely related to the presence of the accretion disk, which is not favored in the spin-down/random-walk epochs because the accretion is dominated by the direct wind accretion.The orbital period is stable during the entire time span; however, the orbital profile changes with time significantly. We found that the depth of the dip near the inferior conjunction of the companion is highly variable, which disfavors the eclipsing scenario. Moreover, the dip was less obvious during the spin-down/random-walk epochs, indicating its correlation with the accretion disk. Further monitoring in both X-ray and optical bands could reveal the establishment of the accretion disk in this system.
  • Most massive stars end their lives in core-collapse supernova explosions and enrich the interstellar medium with explosively nucleosynthesized elements. Following core collapse, the explosion is subject to instabilities as the shock propagates outwards through the progenitor star. Observations of the composition and structure of the innermost regions of a core-collapse supernova provide a direct probe of the instabilities and nucleosynthetic products. SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is one of very few supernovae for which the inner ejecta can be spatially resolved but are not yet strongly affected by interaction with the surroundings. Our observations of SN 1987A with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) are of the highest resolution to date and reveal the detailed morphology of cold molecular gas in the innermost regions of the remnant. The 3D distributions of carbon and silicon monoxide (CO and SiO) emission differ, but both have a central deficit, or torus-like distribution, possibly a result of radioactive heating during the first weeks ("nickel heating"). The size scales of the clumpy distribution are compared quantitatively to models, demonstrating how progenitor and explosion physics can be constrained.
  • We report the discovery of a synchrotron nebula, G283.1-0.59, associated with PSR J1015-5719. Radio observations using the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 36, 16, 6, and 3 cm reveal a complex morphology. The pulsar is embedded in the "head" of the nebula with fan-shaped diffuse emission. This is connected to a circular bubble of 20" radius and a collimated tail extending over 1'. Polarization measurements show a highly ordered magnetic field in the nebula. It wraps around the edge of the head and shows an azimuthal configuration near the pulsar, then switches direction quasi-periodically near the bubble and in the tail. Together with the flat radio spectrum observed, we suggest that this system is most plausibly a pulsar wind nebula (PWN), with the head as a bow shock that has a low Mach number and the bubble as a shell expanding in a dense environment. The bubble could act as a magnetic bottle trapping the relativistic particles. A comparison with other bow-shock PWNe with higher Mach numbers shows similar structure and B-field geometry, implying that pulsar velocity may not be the most critical factor in determining the properties of these systems. We also derive analytic expressions for the projected standoff distance and shape of an inclined bow shock. It is found that the projected distance is always larger than the true distance in three dimensions. On the other hand, the projected shape is not sensitive to the inclination after rescaling with the projected standoff distance.
  • The Type IIn supernova (SN) 1978K in the nearby galaxy NGC 1313 has remained bright in multiwavelengths for more than $\sim 25$ yr. The archival data of SN 1978K collected with ROSAT, ASCA, XMM-Newton, and Chandra from 1990 to 2006 show no significant variation of the soft X-ray emission but a hint of flux decrease in hard X-rays. In this work, we perform a detailed analysis using more than 15 yr of XMM-Newton observations. Both the 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV light-curves decline as $t^{-1}$ from 2000 to 2015. The transition of light curve profiles can be explained in a way that the reverse shock was radiative at an early phase and then became adiabatic at late times. Such a scenario is also supported by the spectral analysis results. We also found a decrease in the absorption column density, which indicates the presence of a cool shell during the radiative phase.
  • We report on a timing and spectral analysis of the young, high magnetic field rotation-powered pulsar (RPP) B1509-58 using Chandra continuous-clocking mode observation. The pulsar's X-ray light curve can be fit by the two Gaussian components and the pulsed fraction shows moderate energy dependence over the Chandra band. The pulsed X-ray spectrum is well described by a power law with a photon index 1.16(4), which is harder than the values measured with RXTE PCA and NuSTAR. This result supports the log-parabolic model for the broadband X-ray spectrum. With the unprecedented angular resolution of Chandra, we clearly identified off-pulse X-ray emission from the pulsar, and its spectrum is best fit by a power law plus blackbody model. The latter component has a temperature of ~0.14 keV with a bolometric luminosity comparable to the luminosities of other young and high magnetic field RPPs, and it lies between the temperature of magnetars and typical RPPs. In addition, we found that the nonthermal X-ray emission of PSR B1509-58 is significantly softer in the off-pulse phase than in the pulsed phase, with the photon index varying between 1.0 and 1.8 and anticorrelated with the flux. This is similar to the behavior of three other young pulsars. We interpreted it as different contributions of pair-creation processes at different altitudes from the neutron star surface according to the outer-gap model.
  • NGC 7793 P13 is an ultraluminous X-ray source harboring an accreting pulsar. We report on the detection of a ~65 d period X-ray modulation with Swift observations in this system. The modulation period found in the X-ray band is P=65.05+/-0.10 d and the profile is asymmetric with a fast rise and a slower decay. On the other hand, the u-band light curve collected by Swift UVOT confirmed an optical modulation with a period of P=64.24+/-0.13 d. We explored the phase evolution of the X-ray and optical periodicities and propose two solutions. A superorbital modulation with a period of ~2,700-4,700 d probably caused by the precession of a warped accretion disk is necessary to interpret the phase drift of the optical data. We further discuss the implication if this ~65d periodicity is caused by the superorbital modulation. Estimated from the relationship between the spin-orbital and orbital-superorbital periods of known disk-fed high-mass X-ray binaries, the orbital period of P13 is roughly estimated as 3-7 d. In this case, an unknown mechanism with a much longer time scale is needed to interpret the phase drift. Further studies on the stability of these two periodicities with a long-term monitoring could help us to probe their physical origins.
  • We report on six new Chandra observations of the Geminga pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The PWN consists of three distinct elongated structures - two $\approx 0.2 d_{250}$ pc long lateral tails and a segmented axial tail of $\approx 0.05 d_{250}$ pc length, where $d_{250}=d/(250 {\rm pc})$. The photon indices of the power law spectra of the lateral tails, $\Gamma \approx 1$, are significantly harder than those of the pulsar ($\Gamma \approx 1.5$) and the axial tail ($\Gamma \approx 1.6$). There is no significant diffuse X-ray emission between the lateral tails -- the ratio of the X-ray surface brightness between the south tail and this sky area is at least 12. The lateral tails apparently connect directly to the pulsar and show indication of moving footpoints. The axial tail comprises time-variable emission blobs. However, there is no evidence for constant or decelerated outward motion of these blobs. Different physical models are consistent with the observed morphology and spectra of the Geminga PWN. In one scenario, the lateral tails could represent an azimuthally asymmetric shell whose hard emission is caused by the Fermi acceleration mechanism of colliding winds. In another scenario, the lateral tails could be luminous, bent polar outflows, while the blobs in the axial tail could represent a crushed torus. In a resemblance to planetary magnetotails, the blobs of the axial tail might also represent short-lived plasmoids which are formed by magnetic field reconnection in the relativistic plasma of the pulsar wind tail.
  • The radio and gamma-ray pulsar PSR J2032+4127 was recently found to be in a decades-long orbit with the Be star MT91 213, with the pulsar moving rapidly towards periastron. This binary shares many similar characteristics with the previously unique binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883. Here, we describe radio, X-ray, and optical monitoring of PSR J2032+4127/MT91 213. Our extended orbital phase coverage in radio, supplemented with Fermi gamma-ray data, allows us to update and refine the orbital period to 45-50 yr and time of periastron passage to 2017 November. We analyse archival and recent Chandra and Swift observations and show that PSR J2032+4127/MT91 213 is now brighter in X-rays by a factor of ~70 since 2002 and ~20 since 2010. While the pulsar is still far from periastron, this increase in X-rays is possibly due to collisions between pulsar and Be star winds. Optical observations of the Halpha emission line of the Be star suggest that the size of its circumstellar disc may be varying by ~2 over timescales as short as 1-2 months. Multiwavelength monitoring of PSR J2032+4127/MT91 213 will continue through periastron passage, and the system should present an interesting test case and comparison to PSR B1259-63/LS 2883.
  • We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) observations of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) associated with PSR B0355+54 (eight observations with a 395 ks total exposure, performed over an 8 month period). We investigated the spatial and spectral properties of the emission coincident with the pulsar, compact nebula (CN), and extended tail. We find that the CN morphology can be interpreted in a way that suggests a small angle between the pulsar spin axis and our line-of-sight, as inferred from the radio data. On larger scales, emission from the 7' (2 pc) tail is clearly seen. We also found hints of two faint extensions nearly orthogonal to the direction of the pulsar's proper motion. The spectrum extracted at the pulsar position can be described with an absorbed power-law + blackbody model. The nonthermal component can be attributed to magnetospheric emission, while the thermal component can be attributed to emission from either a hot spot (e.g., a polar cap) or the entire neutron star surface. Surprisingly, the spectrum of the tail shows only a slight hint of cooling with increasing distance from the pulsar. This implies either a low magnetic field with fast flow speed, or particle re-acceleration within the tail. We estimate physical properties of the PWN and compare the morphologies of the CN and the extended tail with those of other bow shock PWNe observed with long CXO exposures.
  • PSR J1509-5850 is a middle-aged pulsar with the period P ~ 89 ms, spin-down power Edot = 5.1 x 10^35 erg/s, at a distance of about 3.8 kpc. We report on deep Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of this pulsar and its pulsar wind nebula (PWN). In addition to the previously detected tail extending up to 7' southwest from the pulsar (the southern outflow), the deep images reveal a similarly long, faint diffuse emission stretched toward the north (the northern outflow) and the fine structure of the compact nebula (CN) in the pulsar vicinity. The CN is resolved into two lateral tails and one axial tail pointing southwest (a morphology remarkably similar to that of the Geminga PWN), which supports the assumption that the pulsar moves towards the northeast. The luminosities of the southern and northern outflows are about 1 x 10^33 and 4 x 10^32 erg/s, respectively. The spectra extracted from four regions of the southern outflow do not show any softening with increasing distance from the pulsar. The lack of synchrotron cooling suggests a high flow speed or in-situ acceleration of particles. The spectra extracted from two regions of the northern outflow show a hint of softening with distance from the pulsar, which may indicate slower particle propagation. We speculate that the northern outflow is associated with particle leakage from the bow shock apex into the ISM, while the southern outflow represents the tail of the shocked pulsar wind behind the moving pulsar. We estimate the physical parameters of the observed outflows and compare the J1509-5850 PWN with PWNe of other supersonically moving pulsars.
  • Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are suggested to be acceleration sites of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. While the magnetic field plays an important role in the acceleration process, previous observations of magnetic field configurations of PWNe are rare, particularly for evolved systems. We present a radio polarization study of the "Snail" PWN inside the supernova remnant G327.1-1.1 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This PWN is believed to have been recently crushed by the supernova (SN) reverse shock. The radio morphology is composed of a main circular body with a finger-like protrusion. We detected a strong linear polarization signal from the emission, which reflects a highly ordered magnetic field in the PWN and is in contrast to the turbulent environment with a tangled magnetic field generally expected from hydrodynamical simulations. This could suggest that the characteristic turbulence scale is larger than the radio beam size. We built a toy model to explore this possibility, and found that a simulated PWN with a turbulence scale of about one-eighth to one-sixth of the nebula radius and a pulsar wind filling factor of 50--75% provides the best match to observations. This implies substantial mixing between the SN ejecta and pulsar wind material in this system.
  • Central compact objects (CCOs) are a handful of young neutron stars found at the center of supernova remnants (SNRs). They show high thermal X-ray luminosities but no radio emission. Spin-down rate measurements of the three CCOs with X-ray pulsations indicate surface dipole fields much weaker than those of typical young pulsars. To investigate if CCOs and known radio pulsars are objects at different evolutionary stages, we carried out a census of all weak-field (<1e11 G) isolated radio pulsars in the Galactic plane to search for CCO-like X-ray emission. None of the 12 candidates is detected at X-ray energies, with luminosity limits of 1e32-1e34 erg/s. We consider a scenario in which the weak surface fields of CCOs are due to rapid accretion of supernova materials and show that as the buried field diffuses back to the surface, a CCO descendant is expected to leave the P-Pdot parameter space of our candidates at a young age of a few times 10kyr. Hence, the candidates are likely to be just old ordinary pulsars in this case. We suggest that further searches for orphaned CCO, which are aged CCOs with parent SNRs dissipated, should include pulsars with stronger magnetic fields.
  • Neutron stars lose the bulk of their rotational energy in the form of a pulsar wind: an ultra-relativistic outflow of predominantly electrons and positrons. This pulsar wind significantly impacts the environment and possible binary companion of the neutron star, and studying the resultant pulsar wind nebulae is critical for understanding the formation of neutron stars and millisecond pulsars, the physics of the neutron star magnetosphere, the acceleration of leptons up to PeV energies, and how these particles impact the interstellar medium. With the SKA1 and the SKA2, it could be possible to study literally hundreds of PWNe in detail, critical for understanding the many open questions in the topics listed above.
  • We report on two years of flux and spin evolution monitoring of 1E 1048.1$-$5937, a 6.5-s X-ray pulsar identified as a magnetar. Using {\it Swift} XRT data, we observed an X-ray outburst consisting of an increase in the persistent 1--10 keV flux by a factor of 6.3$\pm$0.2, beginning on 2011 December 31 (MJD 55926). Following a delay of $\sim100$ days, the magnetar entered a period of large torque variability, with $\dot{\nu}$ reaching a factor of $4.55\pm0.05$ times the nominal value, before decaying in an oscillatory manner over a time scale of months. We show by comparing to previous outbursts from the source that this pattern of behavior may repeat itself with a quasi-period of $\sim1800$ days. We compare this phenomenology to periodic torque variations in radio pulsars, finding some similarities which suggest a magnetospheric origin for the behavior of 1E 1048.1$-$5937.
  • We report the discovery of PSR J1101-6101, a 62.8 ms pulsar in IGR J11014-6103, a hard X-ray source with a jet and a cometary tail that strongly suggests it is moving away from the center of the supernova remnant (SNR) MSH 11-61A at v>1000 km/s. Two XMM-Newton observations were obtained with the EPIC pn in small window mode, resulting in the measurement of its spin-down luminosity E_dot = 1.36e36 erg/s, characteristic age Tau_c = 116 kyr, and surface magnetic field strength B_s = 7.4e11 G. In comparison to Tau_c, the 10-30 kyr age estimated for MSH 11-61A suggests that the pulsar was born in the SNR with initial period in the range 54 < P_0 < 60 ms. PSR J1101-6101 is the least energetic of the 15 rotation-powered pulsars detected by INTEGRAL, and has a high efficiency of hard X-ray radiation and jet power. We examine the shape of the cometary nebula in a Chandra image, which is roughly consistent with a bow shock at the velocity inferred from the SNR age and the pulsar's E-dot. However, its structure differs in detail from the classic bow shock, and we explore possible reasons for this.
  • The expanding remnant from SN 1987A is an excellent laboratory for investigating the physics of supernovae explosions. There are still a large number of outstanding questions, such the reason for the asymmetric radio morphology, the structure of the pre-supernova environment, and the efficiency of particle acceleration at the supernova shock. We explore these questions using three-dimensional simulations of the expanding remnant between days 820 and 10,000 after the supernova. We combine a hydrodynamical simulation with semi-analytic treatments of diffusive shock acceleration and magnetic field amplification to derive radio emission as part of an inverse problem. Simulations show that an asymmetric explosion, combined with magnetic field amplification at the expanding shock, is able to replicate the persistent one-sided radio morphology of the remnant. We use an asymmetric Truelove & McKee progenitor with an envelope mass of $10 M_{\sun}$ and an energy of $1.5 \times 10^{44} J$. A termination shock in the progenitor's stellar wind at a distance of $0\farcs43-0\farcs51$ provides a good fit to the turn on of radio emission around day 1200. For the H\textsc{ii} region, a minimum distance of $0\farcs63\pm0\farcs01$ and maximum particle number density of $(7.11\pm1.78) \times 10^7$ m$^{-3}$ produces a good fit to the evolving average radius and velocity of the expanding shocks from day 2000 to day 7000 after explosion. The model predicts a noticeable reduction, and possibly a temporary reversal, in the asymmetric radio morphology of the remnant after day 7000, when the forward shock left the eastern lobe of the equatorial ring.
  • We report on X-ray and gamma-ray observations of the millisecond pulsar B1937+21 taken with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, XMM-Newton, and the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The pulsar X-ray emission shows a purely non-thermal spectrum with a hard photon index of 0.9+/-0.1, and is nearly 100% pulsed. We found no evidence of varying pulse profile with energy as previously claimed. We also analyzed 5.5 yr of Fermi survey data and obtained much improved constraints on the pulsar's timing and spectral properties in gamma-rays. The pulsed spectrum is adequately fitted by a simple power-law with a photon index of 2.38+/-0.07. Both the gamma-ray and X-ray pulse profiles show similar two-peak structure and generally align with the radio peaks. We found that the aligned profiles and the hard spectrum in X-rays seem to be common properties among millisecond pulsars with high magnetic fields at the light cylinder. We discuss a possible physical scenario that could give rise to these features.
  • We present a long-term X-ray flux and spectral analysis for 1RXS J170849.0-400910 using Swift/XRT spanning over 8 years from 2005-2013. We also analyze two observations from Chandra and XMM in the period from 2003-2004. In this 10-yr period, 1RXS J170849.0-400910 displayed several rotational glitches. Previous studies have claimed variations in the X-ray emission associated with some of the glitches. From our analysis we find no evidence for significant X-ray flux variations and evidence for only low-level spectral variations. We also present an updated timing solution for 1RXS J170849.0-400910, from RXTE and Swift observations, which includes a previously unreported glitch at MJD 56019. We discuss the frequency and implications of radiatively quiet glitches in magnetars.
  • Supernovae and their remnants are believed to be prodigious sources of Galactic cosmic rays and interstellar dust. Understanding the mechanisms behind their surprisingly high production rate is helped by the study of nearby young supernova remnants. There has been none better in modern times than SN1987A, for which radio observations have been made for over a quarter of a century. We review extensive observations made with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at centimetre wavelengths. Emission at frequencies from 1 to 100 GHz is dominated by synchrotron radiation from an outer shock front which has been growing exponentially in strength from day 3000, and is currently sweeping around the circumstellar ring at about 4000 km s$^{-1}$. Three dimensional models of the propagation of the shock into the circumstellar medium are able to reproduce the main observational features of the remnant, and their evolution. We find that up to 4% of the electrons encountered by the shock are accelerated to relativistic energies. High-frequency ALMA observations will break new ground in the understanding of dust and molecule production.
  • We present radio imaging observations of supernova remnant 1987A at 9 GHz, taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array over 21 years from 1992 to 2013. By employing a Fourier modeling technique to fit the visibility data, we show that the remnant structure has evolved significantly since day 7000 (mid-2006): the emission latitude has gradually decreased, such that the overall geometry has become more similar to a ring structure. Around the same time, we find a decreasing trend in the east-west asymmetry of the surface emissivity. These results could reflect the increasing interaction of the forward shock with material around the circumstellar ring, and the relative weakening of the interaction with the lower-density material at higher latitudes. The morphological evolution caused an apparent break in the remnant expansion measured with a torus model, from a velocity of 4600+150-200 km/s between day 4000 and 7000 to 2400+100-200 km/s after day 7000. However, we emphasize that there is no conclusive evidence for a physical slowing of the shock at any given latitude in the expanding remnant, and that a change of radio morphology alone appears to dominate the evolution. This is supported by our ring-only fits which show a constant expansion of 3890+/-50 km/s without deceleration between days 4000 and 9000. We suggest that once the emission latitude no longer decreases, the expansion velocity obtained from the torus model should return to the same value as that measured with the ring model.
  • Pulsars are remarkable objects that emit across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, providing a powerful probe of the interstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the relation between dispersion measure (DM) and X-ray absorption column density NH using 68 radio pulsars detected at X-ray energies with the Chandra X-ray Observatory or XMM-Newton. We find a best-fit empirical linear relation of NH (10^20 cm^-2)= 0.30+0.13-0.09 DM (pc cm^-3), which corresponds to an average ionization of 10+4-3%, confirming the ratio of one free electron per ten neutral hydrogen atoms commonly assumed in the literature. We also compare different NH estimates and note that some NH values obtained from X-ray observations are higher than the total Galactic HI column density along the same line of sight, while the optical extinction generally gives the best NH predictions.
  • High-magnetic-field radio pulsars are important transition objects for understanding the connection between magnetars and conventional radio pulsars. We present a detailed study of the young radio pulsar J1119-6127, which has a characteristic age of 1900yr and a spin-down-inferred magnetic field of 4.1e13G, and its associated supernova remnant G292.2-0.5, using deep XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray Observatory exposures of over 120ks from each telescope. The pulsar emission shows strong modulation below 2.5keV, with a single-peaked profile and a large pulsed fraction of 0.48+/-0.12. Employing a magnetic, partially ionized hydrogen atmosphere model, we find that the observed pulse profile can be produced by a single hot spot of temperature 0.13keV covering about one third of the stellar surface, and we place an upper limit of 0.08keV for an antipodal hot spot with the same area. The nonuniform surface temperature distribution could be the result of anisotropic heat conduction under a strong magnetic field, and a single-peaked profile seems common among high-B radio pulsars. For the associated remnant G292.2-0.5, its large diameter could be attributed to fast expansion in a low-density wind cavity, likely formed by a Wolf-Rayet progenitor, similar to two other high-B radio pulsars.
  • On 2011 July 14, a transient X-ray source, Swift J1822.3-1606, was detected by Swift BAT via its burst activities. It was subsequently identified as a new magnetar upon the detection of a pulse period of 8.4 s. Using follow-up RXTE, Swift, and Chandra observations, we have determined a spin-down rate of $\dot{P}\sim3\times10^{-13}$, implying a dipole magnetic field of $\sim5\times10^{13}$\,G, second lowest among known magnetars, although our timing solution is contaminated by timing noise. The post-outburst flux evolution is well modelled by surface cooling resulting from heat injection in the outer crust, although we cannot rule out other models. We measure an absorption column density similar to that of the open cluster M17 at 10\arcmin\ away, arguing for a comparable distance of $\sim$1.6\,kpc. If confirmed, this could be the nearest known magnetar.