• The Advanced LIGO observatory recently reported the first direct detection of gravitational waves (GW) which triggered ALIGO on 2015 September 14. We report on observations taken with the Swift satellite two days after the trigger. No new X-ray, optical, UV or hard X-ray sources were detected in our observations, which were focussed on nearby galaxies in the GW error region and covered 4.7 square degrees (~2% of the probability in the rapidly-available GW error region; 0.3% of the probability from the final GW error region, which was produced several months after the trigger). We describe the rapid Swift response and automated analysis of the X-ray telescope and UV/Optical Telescope data, and note the importance to electromagnetic follow up of early notification of the progenitor details inferred from GW analysis.
  • We report on the detection and follow-up high cadence monitoring observations of MAXI J1659-152, a bright Galactic X-ray binary transient with a likely black-hole accretor, by Swift over a 27 day period after its initial outburst detection. MAXI J1659-152 was discovered almost simultaneously by Swift and MAXI on 2010 Sept 25, and was monitored intensively from the early stages of the outburst through the rise to a brightness of ~0.5 Crab by the Swift XRT, UVOT, and BAT. We present temporal and spectral analysis of the Swift observations. The broadband light-curves show variability characteristic of black-hole candidate transients. We present the evolution of thermal and non-thermal components of the 0.5-150 keV combined X-ray spectra during the outburst. MAXI J1659-152 displays accretion state changes typically associated with black-hole binaries, transitioning from its initial detection in the Hard State, to the Steep Power-Law State, followed by a slow evolution towards the Thermal State, signified by an increasingly dominant thermal component associated with the accretion disk, although this state change did not complete before Swift observations ended. We observe an anti-correlation between the increasing temperature and decreasing radius of the inner edge of the accretion disk, suggesting that the inner edge of the accretion disk in-falls towards the black-hole as the disk temperature increases. We observed significant evolution in the absorption column during the initial rise of the outburst, with the absorption almost doubling, suggestive of the presence of an evolving wind from the accretion disk. We detect quasi- periodic oscillations that evolve with the outburst, as well as irregular shaped dips that recur with a period of 2.42\pm0.09 hours, strongly suggesting an orbital period that would make MAXI J1659-152 the shortest period black-hole binary yet known.
  • Context: Gamma Ray Burst models predict the broadband spectral evolution and the temporal evolution of the energy flux. In contrast, standard data analysis tools and data repositories provide count-rate data, or use single flux conversion factors for all of the data, neglecting spectral evolution. Aims: To produce Swift BAT and XRT light curves in flux units, where the spectral evolution is accounted for. Methods: We have developed software to use the hardness ratio information to track spectral evolution of GRBs, and thus to convert the count-rate light curves from the BAT and XRT instruments on Swift into accurate, evolution-aware flux light curves. Results: The Swift Burst Analyser website (http://www.swift.ac.uk/burst_analyser) contains BAT, XRT and combined BAT-XRT flux light curves in three energy regimes for all GRBs observed by the Swift satellite. These light curves are automatically built and updated when data become available, are presented in graphical and plain-text format, and are available for download and use in research.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBSs) are produced by rare types of massive stellar explosions. Their rapidly fading afterglows are often bright enough at optical wavelengths, that they are detectable up to cosmological distances. Hirtheto, the highest known redshift for a GRB was z=6.7, for GRB 080913, and for a galaxy was z=6.96. Here we report observations of GRB 090423 and the near-infrared spectroscopic measurement of its redshift z=8.1^{+0.1}_{-0.3}. This burst happened when the Universe was only ~4% of its current age. Its properties are similar to those of GRBs observed at low/intermediate redshifts, suggesting that the mechanisms and progenitors that gave rise to this burst about 600 million years after the Big Bang are not markedly different from those producing GRBs ~10 billion years later.
  • An X-ray monitoring campaign with Chandra and Swift confirms that 1RXS J171824.2-402934 is accreting at the lowest rate among the known persistently accreting low-mass X-ray binaries. A thermonuclear X-ray burst was detected with the all-sky monitor on RXTE. This is only the second such burst seen in 1RXS J171824.2-402934 in more than 20 Ms of observations done over 19 years. The low burst recurrence rate is in line with the low accretion rate. The persistent nature and low accretion rate can be reconciled within accretion disk theory if the binary system is ultracompact. An unprecedentedly short orbital period of less than approximately 7 minutes would be implied. An ultracompact nature, together with the properties of the type I X-ray burst, suggests, in turn, that helium-rich material is accreted. Optical follow-up of the Chandra error region does not reveal an unambiguous counterpart.
  • We report on Suzaku observations of four unidentified sources from the INTEGRAL and Swift BAT Galactic plane surveys. All the sources have a large neutral hydrogen column density and are likely members of an emerging class of heavily absorbed high mass X-ray binary (HMXB) first identified in INTEGRAL observations. Two of the sources in our sample are approximately constant flux sources, one source shows periodic variation and one source exhibited a short, bright X-ray outburst. The periodicity is transient, suggesting it is produced by a neutron star in an elliptical orbit around a stellar wind source. We analyze the flaring source in several segments to look for spectral variation and discuss the implications of the findings for the nature of the source. We conclude that all four sources in our sample can be identified with the emerging class of highly absorbed HMXBs, that one is a newly identified transient X-ray pulsar and that at least one is a newly identified supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT).
  • Results are discussed of an X-ray and optical observation campaign of the low-mass X-ray binary A1246-58 performed with instruments on Satellite per Astronomia X ('BeppoSAX'), the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the X-ray Multi-mirror Mission ('XMM-Newton'), the Swift mission, and the Very Large Telescope. Spectra and flux time histories are studied. The most important results are the lack of hydrogen spectral features in the optical spectrum, supporting the proposition that this is an ultracompact X-ray binary (UCXB), the determination of a 4.3 kpc distance from time-resolved spectroscopy of thermonuclear X-ray bursts, and the detection of intermediately long thermonuclear bursts as seen in a number of other UCXBs. There is evidence for a Ne/O abundance ratio in the line of sight that is higher than solar and variable. This may be due to different changes in the ionization degrees of Ne and O, which may be related to the variable irradiating flux. We discuss the spectral variability and the peculiarities of the long-term light curve.
  • We have studied the relationship between the [O IV] lambda 25.89 micron emission line luminosities, obtained from Spitzer spectra, the X-ray continua in the 2-10 keV band, primarily from ASCA, and the 14-195 keV band obtained with the SWIFT/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), for a sample of nearby (z < 0.08) Seyfert galaxies. For comparison, we have examined the relationship between the [O III] 5007, the 2-10 keV and the 14-195 keV luminosities for the same set of objects. We find that both the [O IV] and [O III] luminosities are well-correlated with the BAT luminosities. On the other hand, the [O III] luminosities are better-correlated with 2-10 keV luminosities than are those of [O IV]. When comparing [O IV] and [O III] luminosities for the different types of galaxies, we find that the Seyfert 2's have significantly lower [O III] to [O IV] ratios than the Seyfert 1's. We suggest that this is due to more reddening of the narrow line region (NLR) of the Seyfert 2's. Assuming Galactic dust to gas ratios, the average amount of extra reddening corresponds to a hydrogen column density of ~ few times 10^21 cm^-2, which is a small fraction of the X-ray absorbing columns in the Seyfert 2's. The combined effects of reddening and the X-ray absorption are the probable reason why the [O III] versus 2-10 keV correlation is better than the [O IV] versus 2-10 keV, since the [O IV] emission line is much less affected by extinction. Overall, we find the [O IV] to be an accurate and truly isotropic indicator of the power of the AGN. This suggests that it can be useful in deconvolving the contribution of the AGN and starburst to the spectrum of Compton-thick and/or X-ray weak sources.
  • The origins of Gamma-ray Burst prompt emission are currently not well understood and in this context long, well-observed events are particularly important to study. We present the case of GRB 070616, analysing the exceptionally long-duration multipeaked prompt emission, and later afterglow, captured by all the instruments on-board Swift and by Suzaku WAM. The high energy light curve remained generally flat for several hundred seconds before going into a steep decline. Spectral evolution from hard to soft is clearly taking place throughout the prompt emission, beginning at 285 s after the trigger and extending to 1200 s. We track the movement of the spectral peak energy, whilst observing a softening of the low energy spectral slope. The steep decline in flux may be caused by a combination of this strong spectral evolution and the curvature effect. We investigate origins for the spectral evolution, ruling out a superposition of two power laws and considering instead an additional component dominant during the late prompt emission. We also discuss origins for the early optical emission and the physics of the afterglow. The case of GRB 070616 clearly demonstrates that both broadband coverage and good time resolution are crucial to pin down the origins of the complex prompt emission in GRBs.
  • We present an analysis of the X-ray variability of three symbiotic X-ray binaries, GX 1+4, 4U 1700+24, and 4U 1954+31, using observations made with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) All-Sky Monitor (ASM). Observations of 4U 1954+31 with the Swift BAT show modulation at a period near 5 hours. Models to explain this modulation are discussed including the presence of an exceptionally slow X-ray pulsar in the system and accretion instabilities. We conclude that the most likely interpretation is that 4U 1954+31 contains one of the slowest known X-ray pulsars. Unlike 4U 1954+31, neither GX 1+4 nor 4U 1700+24 show any evidence for modulation on a timescale of hours. An analysis of the RXTE ASM light curves of GX 1+4, 4U 1700+24, and 4U 1954+31 does not show the presence of periodic modulation in any source, although there is considerable variability on long timescales for all three sources. There is no modulation in GX 1+4 on either the optical 1161 day orbital period or a previously reported 304 day X-ray period. For 4U 1700+24 we do not confirm the 404 day X-ray period previously proposed for this source from a shorter duration ASM light curve. We conclude that all three sources have substantial low-frequency noise in their power spectra that may give the appearance of periodic modulation if this noise is not properly accounted for, particularly if short duration light curves are examined.
  • The black-hole X-ray binary transient GRO J1655-40 underwent an outburst beginning in early 2005. We present the results of our multi-wavelength observational campaign to study the early outburst spectral and temporal evolution, which combines data from X-ray (RXTE, INTEGRAL), radio (VLA) and optical (ROTSE, SMARTS) instruments. During the reported period the source left quiescence and went through four major accreting black hole states: low-hard, hard intermediate, soft intermediate and high-soft. We investigated dipping behavior in the RXTE band and compare our results to the 1996-1997 case, when the source was predominantly in the high-soft state, finding significant differences. We consider the evolution of the low frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and find that the frequency strongly correlates with the spectral characteristics, before shutting off prior to the transition to the high-soft state. We model the broad-band high-energy spectrum in the context of empirical models, as well as more physically motivated thermal and bulk-motion Comptonization and Compton reflection models. RXTE and INTEGRAL data together support a statistically significant high energy cut-off in the energy spectrum at 100~200 keV during the low-hard state. The RXTE data alone also show it very significantly during the transition, but cannot see one in the high-soft state spectra. We consider radio, optical and X-ray connections in the context of possible synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton origins of X-ray emission in low-hard and intermediate states. In this outburst of GRO J1655-40, the radio flux does not rise strongly with the X-ray flux.
  • Observations of the high-mass X-ray binary 4U 2206+54 with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) do not show modulation at the previously reported period of 9.6 days found from observations made with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) All-Sky Monitor (ASM). Instead, the strongest peak in the power spectrum of the BAT light curve occurs at a period of 19.25 +/- 0.08 days, twice the period found with the RXTE ASM. The maximum of the folded BAT light curve is also delayed compared to the maximum of the folded ASM light curve. The most recent ASM data folded on twice the 9.6 day period show similar morphology to the folded BAT light curve. This suggests that the apparent period doubling is a recent secular change rather than an energy-dependent effect. The 9.6 day period is thus not a permanent strong feature of the light curve. We suggest that the orbital period of 4U 2206+54 may be twice the previously proposed value.
  • We present the first results of our X-ray monitoring campaign on a 1.7 square degree region centered on Sgr A* using the satellites XMM-Newton and Chandra. The purpose of this campaign is to monitor the behavior (below 10 keV) of X-ray sources (both persistent and transient) which are too faint to be detected by monitoring instruments aboard other satellites currently in orbit (e.g., Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer; INTEGRAL). Our first monitoring observations (using the HRC-I aboard Chandra) were obtained on June 5, 2005. Most of the sources detected could be identified with foreground sources, such as X-ray active stars. In addition we detected two persistent X-ray binaries (1E 1743.1-2843; 1A 1742-294), two faint X-ray transients (GRS 1741.9-2853; XMM J174457-2850.3), as well as a possible new transient source at a luminosity of a few times 1E34 erg/s. We report on the X-ray results on these systems and on the non-detection of the transients in follow-up radio data using the Very Large Array. We discuss how our monitoring campaign can help to improve our understanding of the different types of X-ray transients (i.e., the very faint ones).
  • In this Paper we report on our analysis of three Chandra observations of the accretion-powered millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J00291+5934 obtained during the late stages of the 2004 outburst. We also report the serendipitous detection of the source in quiescence by ROSAT during MJD 48830-48839. The detected 0.3-10 keV source count rates varied significantly between the Chandra observations from (7.2+-1.2)x10^-3, (6.8+-0.9)x10^-3, and (1.4+-0.1)x10^-2 counts per second for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Chandra observation, on MJD 53371.88, 53383.99, and 53407.57, respectively. The count rate for the 3rd observation is 2.0+-0.4 times as high as that of the average of the first two observations. The unabsorbed 0.5-10 keV source flux for the best-fit power-law model to the source spectrum was (7.9+-2.5)x10^-14, (7.3+-2.0)x10^-14, and (1.17+-0.22)x10^-13 erg cm^-2 s^-1 for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Chandra observation, respectively. We find that this source flux is consistent with that found by ROSAT [~(5.4+-2.4)x10^-14 erg cm^-2 s^-1]. Under the assumption that the interstellar extinction, N_H, does not vary between the observations, we find that the blackbody temperature during the 2nd Chandra observation is significantly higher than that during the 1st and 3rd observation. Furthermore, the effective temperature of the neutron star derived from fitting an absorbed blackbody or neutron star atmosphere model to the data is rather high in comparison with many other neutron star soft X-ray transients in quiescence, even during the 1st and 3rd observation. If we assume that the source quiescent luminosity is similar to that measured for two other accretion powered millisecond pulsars in quiescence, the distance to IGR J00291+5934 is 2.6-3.6 kpc.
  • Three new X-ray pulsars have been detected in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and the positions of two others have been determined, with archive Chandra data. A series of five observations of the SMC took place between May and October 2002. Analysis of these data has revealed three previously unknown X-ray pulsars at pulse periods of 34, 503 and 138 seconds. The position of pulsar XTE J0052-725, which was originally detected by RXTE on June 19 2002, was also accurately determined and a previously detected 7.78s RXTE pulsar was identified as the source SMC X-3.
  • Regular monitoring of the SMC with RXTE has revealed a huge number of X-ray pulsars. Together with discoveries from other satellites at least 45 SMC pulsars are now known. One of these sources, a pulsar with a period of approximately 7.8 seconds, was first detected in early 2002 and since discovery it has been found to be in outburst nine times. The outburst pattern clearly shows a period of 45.1 +/- 0.4 d which is thought to be the orbital period of this system. Candidate outburst periods have also been obtained for nine other pulsars and continued monitoring will enable us to confirm these. This large number of pulsars, all located at approximately the same distance, enables a wealth of comparative studies. In addition, the large number of pulsars found (which vastly exceeds the number expected simply by scaling the relative mass of the SMC and the Galaxy) reveals the recent star formation history of the SMC which has been influenced by encounters with both the LMC and the Galaxy.
  • A search for pulsations from the Be X-ray binary SAX J2239.3+6116, through observations with the Narrow Field Instruments on BeppoSAX and the Proportional Counter Array on RXTE, yielded the clear presence of a 1247 s coherent oscillation. Given the fairly high X-ray luminosity on previous occasions (up to a few times 10^36 erg/s in 2 to 28 keV), the oscillation must be due to the spin of a neutron star. Assuming that the 262 day recurrence time is the orbital period, SAX J2239.3+6116 has both the longest orbital period and the longest pulse period of 24 Be X-ray binaries with measured orbital periods.
  • Four or five new outbursts were detected of the bright X-ray transient GRS 1747-312 in the globular cluster Terzan 6 between 1996 and 1999, through monitoring campaigns with the Wide Field Cameras (WFCs) on BeppoSAX and the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) on RossiXTE. This is the first time that the source is seen to exhibit recurrent outbursts after the discovery in September 1990 with ART-P on Granat. Three target-of-opportunity observations in 1998 and 1999, with the narrow-field instruments on BeppoSAX and the PCA, revealed one sharp drop in the flux which we identify as an eclipse of the compact X-ray source by the companion star. A detailed analysis of WFC data identifies further eclipses and we measure the orbital period at 12.360+/-0.009 hr. This is consistent with an identification as a low-mass X-ray binary, as suggested already by the association with a globular cluster. The eclipse duration is 0.72+/-0.06 hr. This implies that the inclination angle is larger than 74 deg. The 0.1-200 keV unabsorbed peak luminosity is 7X10^36 erg/s. The nature of the compact object is unclear.