• Electrical readout of spin qubits requires fast and sensitive measurements, but these are hindered by poor impedance matching to the device. We demonstrate perfect impedance matching in a radio-frequency readout circuit, realized by incorporating voltage-tunable varactors to cancel out parasitic capacitances. In the optimized setup, a capacitance sensitivity of $1.6~\mathrm{aF}/\sqrt{\mathrm{Hz}}$ is achieved at a maximum source-drain bias of $170~\mu$V root-mean-square and with bandwidth above $15~$MHz. Coulomb blockade is measured via both conductance and capacitance in a quantum dot, and the two contributions are found to be proportional, as expected from a quasistatic tunneling model. We benchmark our results against the requirements for single-shot qubit readout using quantum capacitance, a goal that has so far been elusive.
  • We present a method of forming and controlling large arrays of gate-defined quantum devices. The method uses a novel, on-chip, multiplexed charge-locking system and helps to overcome the restraints imposed by the number of wires available in cryostat measurement systems. Two device innovations are introduced. Firstly, a multiplexer design which utilises split gates to allow the multiplexer to divide three or more ways at each branch. Secondly we describe a device architecture that utilises a multiplexer-type scheme to lock charge onto gate electrodes. The design allows access to and control of gates whose total number exceeds that of the available electrical contacts and enables the formation, modulation and measurement of large arrays of quantum devices. We fabricate devices utilising these innovations on n-type GaAs/AlGaAs substrates and investigate the stability of the charge locked on to the gates. Proof-of-concept is shown by measurement of the Coulomb blockade peaks of a single quantum dot formed by a floating gate in the device. The floating gate is seen to drift by approximately one Coulomb oscillation per hour.
  • We present a thermometry scheme to extract the temperature of a 2DEG by monitoring the charge occupation of a weakly tunnel-coupled 'thermometer' quantum dot using a quantum point contact detector. Electronic temperatures between 97 mK and 307 mK are measured by this method with an accuracy of up to 3 mK, and agree with those obtained by measuring transport through a quantum dot. The thermometer does not pass a current through the 2DEG, and can be incorporated as an add-on to measure the temperature simultaneously with another operating device. Further, the tuning is independent of temperature.
  • We investigate radio-frequency (rf) reflectometry in a tunable carbon nanotube double quantum dot coupled to a resonant circuit. By measuring the in-phase and quadrature components of the reflected rf signal, we are able to determine the complex admittance of the double quantum dot as a function of the energies of the single-electron states. The measurements are found to be in good agreement with a theoretical model of the device in the incoherent limit. Besides being of fundamental interest, our results present an important step forward towards non-invasive charge and spin state readout in carbon nanotube quantum dots.
  • We investigate atomic force microscope nanolithography of single and bilayer graphene. In situ tip current measurements show that cutting of graphene is not current driven. Using a combination of transport measurements and scanning electron microscopy we show that, while indentations accompanied by tip current appear in the graphene lattice for a range of tip voltages, real cuts are characterized by a strong reduction of the tip current above a threshold voltage. The reliability and flexibility of the technique is demonstrated by the fabrication, measurement, modification and re-measurement of graphene nanodevices with resolution down to 15 nm.
  • We report Pauli spin blockade in an impurity defined carbon nanotube double quantum dot. We observe a pronounced current suppression for negative source-drain bias voltages which is investigated for both symmetric and asymmetric coupling of the quantum dots to the leads. The measured differential conductance agrees well with a theoretical model of a double quantum dot system in the spin-blockade regime which allows us to estimate the occupation probabilities of the relevant singlet and triplet states. This work shows that effective spin-to-charge conversion in nanotube quantum dots is feasible and opens the possibility of single-spin readout in a material that is not limited by hyperfine interaction with nuclear spins.
  • We investigate charge pumping in carbon nanotube quantum dots driven by the electric field of a surface acoustic wave. We find that at small driving amplitudes, the pumped current reverses polarity as the conductance is tuned through a Coulomb blockade peak using a gate electrode. We study the behavior as a function of wave amplitude, frequency and direction and develop a model in which our results can be understood as resulting from adiabatic charge redistribution between the leads and quantum dots on the nanotube.
  • Recent investigations of fractal conductance fluctuations (FCF) in electron billiards reveal crucial discrepancies between experimental behavior and the semiclassical Landauer-Buttiker (SLB) theory that predicted their existence. In particular, the roles played by the billiard's geometry, potential profile and the resulting electron trajectory distribution are not well understood. We present measurements on two custom-made devices - a 'disrupted' billiard device and a 'bilayer' billiard device - designed to probe directly these three characteristics. Our results demonstrate that intricate processes beyond those proposed in the SLB theory are required to explain FCF.
  • We describe the transport properties of a 5 $\mu$m long one-dimensional (1D) quantum wire. Reduction of conductance plateaux due to the introduction of weakly disorder scattering are observed. In an in-plane magnetic field, we observe spin-splitting of the reduced conductance steps. Our experimental results provide evidence that deviation from conductance quantisation is very small for electrons with spin parallel and is about 1/3 for electrons with spin anti-parallel. Moreover, in a high in-plane magnetic field, a spin-polarised 1D channel shows a plateau-like structure close to $0.3 \times e^2/h$ which strengthens with {\em increasing} temperatures. It is suggested that these results arise from the combination of disorder and the electron-electron interactions in the 1D electron gas.
  • A shoulder-like feature close to $(0.7\times 2e^{2}/h)$, "the 0.7 structure" at zero magnetic field was observed in clean one-dimensional (1D) channels [K.J. Thomas et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 135 (1996)]. To provide further understanding of this structure, we have performed low-temperature measurements of a novel design of 1D channel with overlaying finger gates to study the 0.7 structure as a function of lateral confinement strength and potential profile. We found that the structure persists when the lateral confinement strength is changed by a factor of 2. We have also shown that the 0.7 structure present in two 1D channels in series behaves like a single 1D channel which shows the 0.7 structure, demonstrating that the 0.7 structure is not a transmission effect through a ballistic channel at zero in-plane magnetic field.
  • We have measured the low-temperature transport properties of an open quantum dot formed in a clean one-dimensional channel. For the first time, at zero magnetic field, continuous and periodic oscillations superimposed upon ballistic conductance steps are observed when the conductance through the dot $G$ exceeds $2e^2/h$. We ascribe the observed conductance oscillations to evidence for Coulomb charging effects in an open dot. This is supported by the evolution of the oscillating features for $G>2e^2/h$ as a function of both temperature and barrier transparency. Our results strongly suggest that at zero magnetic field, current theoretical and experimental understanding of Coulomb charging effects overlooks charging in the presence of fully transmitted 1D channels.
  • We have measured the low-temperature transport properties of a quantum dot formed in a one-dimensional channel. In zero magnetic field this device shows quantized ballistic conductance plateaus with resonant tunneling peaks in each transition region between plateaus. Studies of this structure as a function of applied perpendicular magnetic field and source-drain bias indicate that resonant structure deriving from tightly bound states is split by Coulomb charging at zero magnetic field.