• We report the parallax and proper motion of five L dwarfs obtained with observations from the robotic Liverpool Telescope. Our derived proper motions are consistent with published values and have considerably smaller errors. Based on our spectral type versus absolute magnitude diagram, we do not find any evidence for binaries among our sample, or, at least no comparable mass binaries. Their space velocities locate them within the thin disk and based on the model comparisons they have solar-like abundances. For all five objects, we derived effective temperature, luminosity, radius, gravity and mass from a evolutionary model(CBA00) and our measured parallax; moreover, we derived their effective temperature by integrating observed optical and near-infrared spectra and model spectra (BSH06 or BT-Dusty respectively) at longer wavelengths to obtain bolometric {\bf flux using} the classical Stefan-Boltzmann law: generally the three temperatures for one object derived using two different methods with three models are consistent, while at lower temperature(e.g. for L4) the differences among the three temperatures are slightly larger than that at higher temperature(e.g. for L1).
  • We use signal enhancement techniques and a matched filter analysis to search for the K band spectroscopic absorption signature of the close orbiting extrasolar giant planet, HD 189733b. With timeseries observations taken with NIRSPEC at the Keck II telescope, we investigate the relative abundances of H2O and carbon bearing molecules, which have now been identified in the dayside spectrum of HD 189733b. We detect a candidate planet signature with a low level of significance, close to the ~153 km/s velocity amplitude of HD 189733b. However, some systematic variations, mainly due to imperfect telluric line removal, remain in the residual spectral timeseries in which we search for the planetary signal. The robustness of our candidate signature is assessed, enabling us to conclude that it is not possible to confirm the presence of any planetary signal which appears at Fp/F* contrasts deeper than the 95.4 per cent confidence level. Our search does not enable us to detect the planet at a contrast ratio of Fp/F* = 1/1920 with 99.9 per cent confidence. We also investigate the effect of model uncertainties on our ability to reliably recover a planetary signal. The use of incorrect temperature, model opacity wavelengths and model temperature-pressure profiles have important consequences for the least squares deconvolution procedure that we use to boost the S/N ratio in our spectral timeseries observations. We find that mismatches between the empirical and model planetary spectrum may weaken the significance of a detection by ~30-60 per cent, thereby potentially impairing our ability to recover a planetary signal with high confidence.
  • We have carried out a search for the 2.14 micron spectroscopic signature of the close orbiting extrasolar giant planet, HD 179949b. High cadence time series spectra were obtained with the CRIRES spectrograph at VLT1 on two closely separated nights. Deconvolution yielded spectroscopic profiles with mean S/N ratios of several thousand, enabling the near infrared contrast ratios predicted for the HD 179949 system to be achieved. Recent models have predicted that the hottest planets may exhibit spectral signatures in emission due to the presence of TiO and VO which may be responsible for a temperature inversion high in the atmosphere. We have used our phase dependent orbital model and tomographic techniques to search for the planetary signature under the assumption of an absorption line dominated atmospheric spectrum, where T and V are depleted from the atmospheric model, and an emission line dominated spectrum, where TiO and VO are present. We do not detect a planet in either case, but the 2.120 - 2.174 micron wavelength region covered by our observations enables the deepest near infrared limits yet to be placed on the planet/star contrast ratio of any close orbiting extrasolar giant planet system. We are able to rule out the presence of an atmosphere dominated by absorption opacities in the case of HD 179949b at a contrast ratio of F_p/F_* ~ 1/3350, with 99 per cent confidence.
  • We obtained 238 spectra of the close orbiting extrasolar giant planet HD 189733b with resolution R ~ 15,000 during one night of observations with the near infrared spectrograph, NIRSPEC, at the Keck II Telescope. We have searched for planetary absorption signatures in the 2.0 - 2.4 micron region where H_2O and CO are expected to be the dominant atmospheric opacities. We employ a phase dependent orbital model and tomographic techniques to search for the planetary absorption signatures in the combined stellar and planetary spectra. Because potential absorption signatures are hidden in the noise of each single exposure, we use a model list of lines to apply a spectral deconvolution. The resulting mean profile possesses a S/N ratio that is 20 times greater than that found in individual lines. Our spectral timeseries thus yields spectral signatures with a mean S/N = 2720. We are unable to detect a planetary signature at a contrast ratio of log_10(F_p/F_*) = -3.40, with 63.8 per cent confidence. Our findings are not consistent with model predictions which nevertheless give a good fit to mid-infrared observations of HD 189733. The 1-sigma result is a factor of 1.7 times less than the predicted 2.185 micron planet/star flux ratio of log_10(F_p/F_*) ~ -3.16.
  • We present a search for the near infrared spectroscopic signature of the close orbiting extrasolar giant planet HD 75289b. We obtained ~230 spectra in the wavelength range 2.18 - 2.19 microns using the Phoenix spectrograph at Gemini South. By considering the direct spectrum, derived from irradiated model atmospheres, we search for the absorption profile signature present in the combined star and planet light. Since the planetary spectrum is separated from the stellar spectrum at most phases, we apply a phase dependent orbital model and tomographic techniques to search for absorption signatures. Because the absorption signature lies buried in the noise of a single exposure we apply a multiline deconvolution to the spectral lines available in order to boost the effective S/N ratio of the data. The wavelength coverage of 80 angstroms is expected to contain ~100 planetary lines, enabling a mean line with S/N ratio of ~800 to be achieved after deconvolution. We are nevertheless unable to detect the presence of the planet in the data and carry out further simulations to show that broader wavelength coverage should enable a planet like HD 75289b to be detected with 99.9 per cent (4 sigma) confidence. We investigate the sensitivity of our method and estimate detection tolerances for mismatches between observed and model planetary atmospheres.