• We analyze GRB 151027A within the binary-driven hypernova (BdHN) approach, with progenitor a carbon-oxygen core on the verge of a supernova (SN) explosion and a binary companion neutron star (NS). The hypercritical accretion of the SN ejecta onto the NS leads to its gravitational collapse into a black hole (BH), to the emission of the GRB and to a copious $e^+e^-$ plasma. The impact of this $e^+e^-$ plasma on the SN ejecta explains the properties of \textit{\textbf{all}} early SXF observed in long GRBs. We here apply this approach to the UPE and to the HXFs. We use GRB 151027A as a prototype. From the time-integrated and the time-resolved analysis we identify a double component in the UPE and confirm its ultra-relativistic nature. We confirm the mildly-relativistic nature of the SXF, of the HXF and of the ETE. By a relativistic analysis, we show that the ETE identifies the transition from a SN to the HN. We then address the theoretical justification of these observations by integrating the hydrodynamical propagation equations of the $e^+ e^-$ into the SN ejecta, the latter independently obtained from 3D smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics simulations. We conclude that the UPE, the HXF and the SXF do not form a causally connected sequence. They are the manifestation of \textbf{the same} physical process of the BH formation as seen through different viewing angles, implied by the morphology and the $\sim 300$~s rotation period of the HN ejecta.
  • We describe the afterglows of long GRBs within the context of a binary-driven hypernova (BdHN). In this paradigm afterglows originate from the interaction between a newly born neutron star (vNS), created by an Ic supernova (SN), and a mildly relativistic ejecta of a hypernova (HN). Such a HN in turn results from the impact of the GRB on the original SN Ic. The mildly relativistic expansion velocity of the afterglow ($\Gamma$~3) is determined, using our model indipendent approach, from the thermal emission between 196s and 461s. The observed power-law afterglow in the optical and X-ray bands is shown to arise from the synchrotron emission of relativistic electrons in the expanding magnetized HN ejecta. Two components contribute to the injected energy: the kinetic energy of the mildly relativistic expanding HN and the rotational energy of the fast rotating highly magnetized vNS. As an example we reproduce the observed afterglow of GRB130427A [...]. Initially, the emission is dominated by the loss of kinetic energy of the HN component. After $10^5$s the emission is dominated by the loss of rotational energy of the vNS, for which we adopt an initial rotation period of 2ms and a dipole/quadrupole magnetic field of $\lesssim7x10^{12}$G/~$10^{14}$G. This approach opens new views on the roles of the GRB interaction with the SN ejecta, on the mildly relativistic kinetic energy of the HN and on the pulsar-like phenomena of the vNS. This scenario differs from the current ultra-relativistic treatments of the afterglows and is consistent with the current observations of the mildly relativistic expansions determined in a model independent approach in the Hard X-ray flares (HXFs), extended thermal emission (ETE), soft X-ray flares (SXFs) and flare-plateau-afterglow (FPA) phase in the BdHN, as well as of the thermal emission between 196s and 461s first presented in this paper.
  • We address the significance of the observed GeV emission from \textit{Fermi}-LAT on the understanding of the structure of long GRBs. We examine 82 X-ray Flashs (XRFs), in none of them GeV radiation is observed, adding evidence to the absence of a black hole (BH) formation in their merging process. By examining $329$ Binary-driven Hypernovae (BdHNe) we find that out of $48$ BdHNe observable by \textit{Fermi}-LAT in \textit{only} $21$ of them the GeV emission is observed. The Gev emission in BdHNE follows a universal power-law relation between the luminosity and time, when measured in the rest frame of the source. The power-law index in BdHNe is of $-1.20 \pm 0.04$, very similar to the one discovered in S-GRBs, $-1.29 \pm 0.06$. The GeV emission originates from the newly-born BH and allows to determine its mass and spin. We further give the first evidence for observing a new GRB subclass originating from the merging of a hypernova (HN) and an already formed BH binary companion. We conclude that the GeV emission is a necessary and sufficient condition to confirm the presence of a BH in the hypercritical accretion process occurring in a HN. The remaining $27$ BdHNe, recently identified as sources of flaring in X-rays and soft gamma-rays, have no GeV emission. From this and previous works, we infer that the observability of the GeV emission in some BdHNe is hampered by the presence of the HN ejecta. We conclude that the GeV emission can only be detected when emitted within a half-opening angle $\approx$60$^{\circ}$ normal to the orbital plane of the BdHN.
  • Within the classification of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in different subclasses we give further evidence that short bursts, originating from binary neutron star (B-NS) progenitors, exist in two subclasses: the short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs) and the short gamma-ray bursts (S-GRBs). It has already been shown that S-GRFs occur when the B-NS mergers lead to a massive neutron star (M-NS), having the isotropic energy $\lesssim$ $10^{52}$ erg and a soft spectrum with a peak at a value of $E_{\rm p,i}\sim 0.2$--$2$ MeV. Similarly, S-GRBs occur when B-NS merging leads to the formation of a black hole (BH), with isotropic energy $\gtrsim 10^{52}$ erg and a hard spectrum with a peak at a value of $E_{\rm p,i}\sim 2$--$8$ MeV. We here focus on 18 S-GRFs and 6 S-GRBs, all with known or derived cosmological redshifts following \textit{Fermi}-LAT observations. We evidence that \textit{all} S-GRFs have no GeV emission. The S-GRBs \textit{all} have GeV emission and their $0.1$--$100$ GeV luminosity light-curves as a function of time in the rest-frame follow a universal power-law, $L(t)= (0.88\pm 0.13) \times 10^{52}~t^{-(1.29 \pm 0.06)}$~erg~s$^{-1}$. From the mass formula of a Kerr BH we can correspondingly infer for S-GRBs a minimum BH mass in the range of $2.24$--$2.89 M_\odot$ and a corresponding maximum dimensionless spin in the range of $0.18$--$0.33$.
  • We analyze the early X-ray flares in the GRB "flare-plateau-afterglow" (FPA) phase observed by Swift-XRT. The FPA occurs only in one of the seven GRB subclasses: the binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe). This subclass consists of long GRBs with a carbon-oxygen core and a neutron star (NS) binary companion as progenitors. The hypercritical accretion of the supernova (SN) ejecta onto the NS can lead to the gravitational collapse of the NS into a black hole. Consequently, one can observe a GRB emission with isotropic energy $E_{iso}\gtrsim10^{52}$~erg, as well as the associated GeV emission and the FPA phase. Previous work had shown that gamma-ray spikes in the prompt emission occur at $\sim 10^{15}$--$10^{17}$~cm with Lorentz gamma factor $\Gamma\sim10^{2}$--$10^{3}$. Using a novel data analysis we show that the time of occurrence, duration, luminosity and total energy of the X-ray flares correlate with $E_{iso}$. A crucial feature is the observation of thermal emission in the X-ray flares that we show occurs at radii $\sim10^{12}$~cm with $\Gamma\lesssim 4$. These model independent observations cannot be explained by the "fireball" model, which postulates synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation from a single ultra relativistic jetted emission extending from the prompt to the late afterglow and GeV emission phases. We show that in BdHNe a collision between the GRB and the SN ejecta occurs at $\simeq10^{10}$~cm reaching transparency at $\sim10^{12}$~cm with $\Gamma\lesssim4$. The agreement between the thermal emission observations and these theoretically derived values validates our model and opens the possibility of testing each BdHN episode with the corresponding Lorentz gamma factor.
  • Theoretical and observational evidences have been recently gained for a two-fold classification of short bursts: 1) short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}<10^{52}$~erg and no BH formation, and 2) the authentic short gamma-ray bursts (S-GRBs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}>10^{52}$~erg evidencing a BH formation in the binary neutron star merging process. The signature for the BH formation consists in the on-set of the high energy ($0.1$--$100$~GeV) emission, coeval to the prompt emission, in all S-GRBs. No GeV emission is expected nor observed in the S-GRFs. In this paper we present two additional S-GRBs, GRB 081024B and GRB 140402A, following the already identified S-GRBs, i.e., GRB 090227B, GRB 090510 and GRB 140619B. We also return on the absence of the GeV emission of the S-GRB 090227B, at an angle of $71^{\rm{o}}$ from the \textit{Fermi}-LAT boresight. All the correctly identified S-GRBs correlate to the high energy emission, implying no significant presence of beaming in the GeV emission. The existence of a common power-law behavior in the GeV luminosities, following the BH formation, when measured in the source rest-frame, points to a commonality in the mass and spin of the newly-formed BH in all S-GRBs.
  • There is mounting evidence for the binary nature of the progenitors of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). For a long GRB, the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm proposes as progenitor, or "in-state", a tight binary system composed of a carbon-oxygen core (CO$_{core}$) undergoing a supernova (SN) explosion which triggers hypercritical accretion onto a neutron star (NS) companion. For a short GRB, a NS-NS merger is traditionally adopted as the progenitor. We divide long and short GRBs into two sub-classes, depending on whether or not a black hole (BH) is formed in the merger or in the hypercritical accretion process exceeding the NS critical mass. For long bursts, when no BH is formed we have the sub-class of X-ray flashes (XRFs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}\lesssim10^{52}$ erg and rest-frame spectral peak energy $E_{p,i}\lesssim200$ keV. When a BH is formed we have the sub-class of binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe), with $E_{iso}\gtrsim10^{52}$ erg and $E_{p,i}\gtrsim200$ keV. In analogy, short bursts are similarly divided into two sub-classes. When no BH is formed, short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs) occur, with $E_{iso}\lesssim10^{52}$ erg and $E_{p,i}\lesssim2$ MeV. When a BH is formed, the authentic short GRBs (S-GRBs) occur, with $E_{iso}\gtrsim10^{52}$ erg and $E_{p,i}\gtrsim2$ MeV. We give examples and observational signatures of these four sub-classes and their rate of occurrence. From their respective rates it is possible that "in-states" of S-GRFs and S-GRBs originate from the "out-states" of XRFs. We indicate two additional progenitor systems: white dwarf-NS and BH-NS. These systems have hybrid features between long and short bursts. In the case of S-GRBs and BdHNe evidence is given of the coincidence of the onset of the high energy GeV emission with the birth of a Kerr BH.
  • In a new classification of merging binary neutron stars (NSs) we separate short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in two sub-classes. The ones with $E_{iso}\lesssim10^{52}$ erg coalesce to form a massive NS and are indicated as short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs). The hardest, with $E_{iso}\gtrsim10^{52}$ erg, coalesce to form a black hole (BH) and are indicated as genuine short-GRBs (S-GRBs). Within the fireshell model, S-GRBs exhibit three different components: the P-GRB emission, observed at the transparency of a self-accelerating baryon-$e^+e^-$ plasma; the prompt emission, originating from the interaction of the accelerated baryons with the circumburst medium; the high-energy (GeV) emission, observed after the P-GRB and indicating the formation of a BH. GRB 090510 gives the first evidence for the formation of a Kerr BH or, possibly, a Kerr-Newman BH. Its P-GRB spectrum can be fitted by a convolution of thermal spectra whose origin can be traced back to an axially symmetric dyadotorus. A large value of the angular momentum of the newborn BH is consistent with the large energetics of this S-GRB, which reach in the 1--10000 keV range $E_{iso}=(3.95\pm0.21)\times10^{52}$ erg and in the 0.1--100 GeV range $E_{LAT}=(5.78\pm0.60)\times10^{52}$ erg, the most energetic GeV emission ever observed in S-GRBs. The theoretical redshift $z_{th}=0.75\pm0.17$ that we derive from the fireshell theory is consistent with the spectroscopic measurement $z=0.903\pm0.003$, showing the self-consistency of the theoretical approach. All S-GRBs exhibit GeV emission, when inside the Fermi-LAT field of view, unlike S-GRFs, which never evidence it. The GeV emission appears to be the discriminant for the formation of a BH in GRBs, confirmed by their observed overall energetics.
  • Following the recently established "Binary-driven HyperNova" (BdHN) paradigm, we here interpret GRB 970828 in terms of the four episodes typical of such a model. The "Episode 1", up to 40 s after the trigger time t_0, with a time varying thermal emission and a total energy of E_{iso,1st} = 2.60 x 10^{53} erg, is interpreted as due to the onset of an hyper-critical accretion process onto a companion neutron star, triggered by the companion star, an FeCO core approaching a SN explosion. The "Episode 2", observed up t_0+90 s, is interpreted as a canonical gamma ray burst, with an energy of E^{e^+e^-}_{tot} = 1.60 x 10^{53} erg, a baryon load of B = 7 x 10^{-3} and a bulk Lorentz factor at transparency of \Gamma = 142.5. From this Episode 2, we infer that the GRB exploded in an environment with a large average particle density <n> \approx 10^3 particles/cm^3 and dense clouds characterized by typical dimensions of (4 \div 8) x 10^{14} cm and \delta n / n ~ 10. The "Episode 3" is identified from t_0+90 s all the way up to 10^{5-6} s: despite the paucity of the early X-ray data, typical in the BATSE, pre-Swift era, we find extremely significant data points in the late X-ray afterglow emission of GRB 970828, which corresponds to the ones observed in all BdHNe sources. The "Episode 4", related to the Supernova emission, does not appear to be observable in this source, due to the presence of darkening from the large density of the GRB environment, also inferred from the analysis of the Episode 2.
  • We have performed our data analysis of the observations by Swift and Fermi satellites in order to probe the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm for GRBs associated with supernovae (SNe), in the "terra incognita" of GRB 130427A. We compare and contrast our data analysis with those in the literature. We have verified that the GRB 130427A conforms to the IGC paradigm by examining the power law behavior of the luminosity in the early $10^4$ s of the Swift-XRT observations. This has led to the successful prediction of the occurrence of SN 2013cq and to the identification of the four different episodes of the "binary driven hypernovae" (BdHNe). The exceptional quality of the data has allowed the identification of novel features in Episode 3 including: a) the confirmation and the extension of the existence of the recently discovered "nested structure" in the late X-ray luminosity in GRB 130427A, as well as the identification of a spiky structure at $10^2$ s in the cosmological rest-frame of the source; b) a power law emission of the GeV luminosity light curve and its onset at the end of Episode 2 c) different Lorentz $\Gamma$ factors for the emitting regions of the X-ray and GeV emissions in this Episode 3. These results make it possible to test the details of the physical and astrophysical regimes at work in the BdHNe: 1) a newly born neutron star and the supernova ejecta, originating in Episode 1, 2) a newly formed black hole originating in Episode 2, and 3) the possible interaction among these components, observable in the standard features of Episode 3.
  • CONTEXT: The induced gravitational collapse (IGC) scenario has been introduced in order to explain the most energetic gamma ray bursts (GRBs), Eiso=10^{52}-10^{54}erg, associated with type Ib/c supernovae (SNe). It has led to the concept of binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) originating in a tight binary system composed by a FeCO core on the verge of a SN explosion and a companion neutron star (NS). Their evolution is characterized by a rapid sequence of events: [...]. AIMS: We investigate whether GRB 090423, one of the farthest observed GRB at z=8.2, is a member of the BdHN family. METHODS: We compare and contrast the spectra, the luminosity evolution and the detectability in the observations by Swift of GRB 090423 with the corresponding ones of the best known BdHN case, GRB 090618. RESULTS: Identification of constant slope power-law behavior in the late X-ray emission of GRB 090423 and its overlapping with the corresponding one in GRB 090618, measured in a common rest frame, represents the main result of this article. This result represents a very significant step on the way to using the scaling law properties, proven in Episode 3 of this BdHN family, as a cosmological standard candle. CONCLUSIONS: Having identified GRB 090423 as a member of the BdHN family, we can conclude that SN events, leading to NS formation, can already occur already at z=8.2, namely at 650 Myr after the Big Bang. It is then possible that these BdHNe originate stem from 40-60 M_{\odot} binaries. They are probing the Population II stars after the completion and possible disappearance of Population III stars.
  • Context: The induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm addresses the very energetic (10^{52}-10^{54}erg) long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated to supernovae (SNe). Unlike the traditional "collapsar" model, an evolved FeCO core with a companion neutron star (NS) in a tight binary system is considered as the progenitor. This special class of sources, here named "binary driven hypernovae" (BdHNe), presents a composite sequence composed of four different episodes [...]. Aims: We first compare and contrast the steep decay, the plateau and the power-law decay of the X-ray luminosities of three selected BdHNe [...]. Second, to explain the different sizes and Lorentz factors of the emitting regions of the four Episodes, [...]. Finally, we show the possible role of r-process, which originates in the binary system of the progenitor.. Methods: We compare and contrast the late X-ray luminosity of the above three BdHNe. We examine correlations between the time at the starting point of the constant late power-law decay, t^*_a, the average prompt luminosity, <L_{iso}>, and the luminosity at the end of the plateau, L_a. We analyze a thermal emission (~0.97-0.29 keV), observed during the X-ray steep decay phase of GRB 090618. Results: The late X-ray luminosities of the three BdHNe [...] show a precisely constrained "nested" structure [...]. Conclusions: We confirm a constant slope power-law behavior for the late X-ray luminosity in the source rest-frame, which may lead to a new distance indicator for BdHNe. These results, as well as the emitter size and Lorentz factor, appear to be inconsistent with the traditional afterglow model based on synchrotron emission from an ultra-relativistic [...] collimated jet outflow. We argue, instead, for the possible role of r-process, originating in the binary system, to power the mildly relativistic X-ray source.
  • GRB 090510, observed both by Fermi and AGILE satellites, is the first bright short-hard Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) with an emission from the keV up to the GeV energy range. Within the Fireshell model, we interpret the faint precursor in the light curve as the emission at the transparency of the expanding e+e- plasma: the Proper-GRB (P-GRB). From the observed isotropic energy we assume a total energy Ee+e-=(1.10+-0.06)*10^53 erg and derive a Baryon load B=(1.45+-0.28)*10^(-3) and a Lorentz factor at transparency Gamma=(6.7+-1.6)*10^2. The main emission 0.4 s after the initial spike is interpreted as the extended afterglow, due to the interaction of the ultrarelativistic baryons with the CircumBurst Medium (CBM). Using the condition of fully radiative regime, we infer a CBM average spherically symmetric density of nCBM=(1.85+-0.14)10^3 cm^(-3), one of the highest found in the Fireshell model. The value of the filling factor, 1.5*10^(-10)<R<3.8*10^(-8), leads to the estimate of filaments with densities nfil=nCBM/R=(10^6 - 10^14) cm^(-3). The sub-MeV and the MeV emissions are well reproduced. When compared to the canonical GRBs with nCBM=1 cm^(-3) and to the disguised short GRBs with nCBM=10^(-3) cm^(-3), the case of GRB 090510 leads to the existence of a new family of bursts exploding in an over-dense galactic region with hn nCBM=10^3 cm^(-3). The joint effect of the high Lorentz factor and the high density compresses in time and "inflates" in intensity the extended afterglow, making it appear as a short burst, which we here define as "disguised short GRB by excess". The determination of the above parameters values may represent an important step towards the explanation of the GeV emission.
  • We present the results of the analysis of GRB 101023 in the fireshell scenario. Its redshift has not been determined due to the lack of data in the optical band, so we tried to infer it from the Amati Relation, obtaining z=0.9. Its light curve presents a double emission, which makes it very similar to the already studied GRB 091018. We performed a time-resolved spectral analysis with XSPEC using different spectral models, and fitted the light curve with the numerical code GRBsim. We used Fermi GBM data to build the light curve, in particular the second INa detector, in the range (8-440 keV). We found that the first emission does not match the requirements for a GRB, while the second part perfectly agrees with being a canonical GRB, with a P-GRB lasting 4s.
  • This is a summary of the two talks presented at the Rome GRB meeting by C.L. Bianco and R. Ruffini. It is shown that by respecting the Relative Space-Time Transformation (RSTT) paradigm and the Interpretation of the Burst Structure (IBS) paradigm, important inferences are possible: a) in the new physics occurring in the energy sources of GRBs, b) on the structure of the bursts and c) on the composition of the interstellar matter surrounding the source.
  • We analyze the data of the Gamma-Ray Burst/Supernova GRB030329/SN2003dh system obtained by HETE-2 (GCN [1]), R-XTE (GCN [2]), XMM (Tiengo et al. [3]) and VLT (Hjorth et al. [4]) within our theory (Ruffini et al. [5] and references therein) for GRB030329. By fitting the only three free parameters of the EMBH theory, we obtain the luminosity in fixed energy bands for the prompt emission and the afterglow (see Fig.1). Since the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) analysis is consistent with a spherically symmetric expansion, the energy of GRB030329 is E = 2.1 * 10^{52} erg, namely ~ 2 * 10^3 times larger than the Supernova energy. We conclude that either the GRB is triggering an induced-supernova event or both the GRB and the Supernova are triggered by the same relativistic process. In no way the GRB can be originated from the supernova. We also evidence that the XMM observations (Tiengo et al. [3]), much like in the system GRB980425/SN1998bw (Ruffini et al. [6], Pian et al. [7]), are not part of the GRB afterglow, as interpreted in the literature (Tiengo et al. [3]), but are associated to the Supernova phenomenon. A dedicated campaign of observations is needed to confirm the nature of this XMM source as a newly born neutron star cooling by generalized URCA processes.
  • We consider the gamma-ray burst of 1997 February 28 (GRB 970228) within the ElectroMagnetic Black Hole (EMBH) model. We first determine the value of the two free parameters that characterize energetically the GRB phenomenon in the EMBH model, that is to say the dyadosphere energy, $E_{dya}=5.1\times10^{52}$ ergs, and the baryonic remnant mass $M_{B}$ in units of $E_{dya}$, $B=M_{B}c^{2}/E_{dya}=3.0\times10^{-3}$. Having in this way estimated the energy emitted during the beam-target phase, we evaluate the role of the InterStellar Medium (ISM) number density (n$_{ISM}$) and of the ratio ${\cal R}$ between the effective emitting area and the total surface area of the GRB source, in reproducing the observed profiles of the GRB 970228 prompt emission and X-ray (2-10 keV energy band) afterglow. The importance of the ISM distribution three-dimensional treatment around the central black hole is also stressed in this analysis.
  • Our GRB theory, previously developed using GRB 991216 as a prototype, is here applied to GRB 980425. We fit the luminosity observed in the 40--700 keV, 2--26 keV and 2--10 keV bands by the BeppoSAX satellite. In addition the supernova SN1998bw is the outcome of an ``induced gravitational collapse'' triggered by GRB 980425, in agreement with the GRB-Supernova Time Sequence (GSTS) paradigm (\citet{lett3}). A further outcome of this astrophysically exceptional sequence of events is the formation of a young neutron star generated by the SN1998bw event (\citet{cospar02}). A coordinated observational activity is recommended to further enlighten the underlying scenario of this most unique astrophysical system.
  • A theoretical attempt to identify the physical process responsible for the afterglow emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) is presented, leading to the occurrence of thermal emission in the comoving frame of the shock wave giving rise to the bursts. The determination of the luminosities and spectra involves integration over an infinite number of Planckian spectra, weighted by appropriate relativistic transformations, each one corresponding to a different viewing angle in the past light cone of the observer. The relativistic transformations have been computed using the equations of motion of GRBs within our theory, giving special attention to the determination of the equitemporal surfaces. The only free parameter of the present theory is the ``effective emitting area'' in the shock wave front. A self consistent model for the observed hard-to-soft transition in GRBs is also presented. When applied to GRB 991216 a precise fit $(\chi^2\simeq 1.078)$ of the observed luminosity in the 2--10 keV band is obtained. Similarly, detailed estimates of the observed luminosity in the 50--300 keV and in the 10--50 keV bands are obtained.
  • The properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) maps carry valuable cosmological information. Here we report the results of the analysis hot and cold CMB anisotropy spots in the BOOMERanG 150 GHz map in terms of number, area, ellipticity, vs. temperature threshold. We carried out this analysis for the map obtained by summing independent measurement channels (signal plus noise map) and for a comparison map (noise only map) obtained by differencing the same channels. The anisotropy areas (spots) have been identified for both maps for various temperature thresholds and a catalog of the spots has been produced. The orientation (obliquity) of the spots is random for both maps. We computed the mean elongation of spots obtained from the maps at a given temperature threshold using a simple estimator. We found that for the sum map there is a region of temperature thresholds where the average elongation is not dependent on the threshold. Its value is ~ 2.3 for cold areas and ~ 2.2 for hot areas. This is a non-trivial result. The bias of the estimator is less than 0.4 for areas of size less than 30', and smaller for larger areas. The presence of noise also biases the ellipticity by less than 0.3. These biases have not been subtracted in the results quoted above. The threshold independent and random obliquity behaviour in the sum map is stable against pointing reconstruction accuracy and noise level of the data, thus confirming that these are actual properties of the dataset. The data used here give a hint of high ellipticity for the largest spots. Analogous elongation properties of CMB anisotropies had been detected for COBE-DMR 4-year data. If this is due to geodesics mixing, it would point to a non zero curvature of the Universe.
  • If due attention is given in formulating the basic equations for the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) phenomenon and in performing the corresponding quantitative analysis, GRBs open a main avenue of inquiring on totally new physical and astrophysical regimes. This program is one of the greatest computational efforts in physics and astrophysics and cannot be actuated using shortcuts. A systematic approach has been highlighted in three paradigms: the relative space-time transformation (RSTT) paradigm, the interpretation of the burst structure (IBS) paradigm, the GRB-supernova time sequence (GSTS) paradigm. In fundamental physics new regimes are explored: (1) the process of energy extraction from black holes; (2) the quantum and general relativistic effects of matter-antimatter creation near the black hole horizon; (3) the physics of ultrarelativisitc shock waves with Lorentz gamma factor $\gamma > 100$. In astronomy and astrophysics also new regimes are explored: (i) the occurrence of gravitational collapse to a black hole from a critical mass core of mass $M\agt 10M_\odot$, which clearly differs from the values of the critical mass encountered in the study of stars ``catalyzed at the endpoint of thermonuclear evolution" (white dwarfs and neutron stars); (ii) the extremely high efficiency of the spherical collapse to a black hole, where almost 99.99% of the core mass collapses leaving negligible remnant; (iii) the necessity of developing a fine tuning in the final phases of thermonuclear evolution of the stars, both for the star collapsing to the black hole and the surrounding ones, in order to explain the possible occurrence of the "induced gravitational collapse". A new class of space missions to acquire information on such extreme new regimes are urgently needed.
  • We have proposed three paradigms for the theoretical interpretation of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). (1) The relative space-time transformation (RSTT) paradigm emphasizes how the knowledge of the entire world-line of the source from the moment of gravitational collapse is a necessary condition to interpret GRB data. (2) The interpretation of the burst structure (IBS) paradigm differentiates in all GRBs between an injector phase and a beam-target phase. (3) The GRB-supernova time sequence (GSTS) paradigm introduces the concept of induced supernova explosion in the supernovae-GRB association. These three paradigms are illustrated using our theory based on the vacuum polarization process occurring around an electromagnetic black hole (EMBH theory) and using GRB 991216 as a prototype. We illustrate the five fundamental eras of the EMBH theory: the self acceleration of the $e^+e^-$ pair-electromagnetic plasma (PEM pulse), its interaction with the baryonic remnant of the progenitor star (PEMB pulse). We then study the approach of the PEMB pulse to transparency, the emission of the proper GRB (P-GRB) and its relation to the ``short GRBs''. Finally the three different regimes of the afterglow are described within the fully radiative and radial approximations. The best fit of the theory leads to an unequivocal identification of the ``long GRBs'' as extended emission occurring at the afterglow peak (E-APE). The relative intensities, the time separation and the hardness ratio of the P-GRB and the E-APE are used as distinctive observational test of the EMBH theory and the excellent agreement between our theoretical predictions and the observations are documented. The afterglow power-law indexes in the EMBH theory are compared and contrasted with the ones in the literature, and no beaming process is found for GRB 991216.
  • Using GRB 991216 as a prototype, it is shown that the intensity substructures observed in what is generally called the "prompt emission" in gamma ray bursts (GRBs) do originate in the collision between the accelerated baryonic matter (ABM) pulse with inhomogeneities in the interstellar medium (ISM). The initial phase of such process occurs at a Lorentz factor $\gamma\sim 310$. The crossing of ISM inhomogeneities of sizes $\Delta R\sim 10^{15}$ cm occurs in a detector arrival time interval of $\sim 0.4$ s implying an apparent superluminal behavior of $\sim 10^5c$. The long lasting debate between the validity of the external shock model vs. the internal shock model for GRBs is solved in favor of the first.
  • Given the very accurate data from the BATSE experiment and RXTE and Chandra satellites, we use the GRB 991216 as a prototypical case to test the EMBH theory linking the origin of the energy of GRBs to the electromagnetic energy of black holes. The fit of the afterglow fixes the only two free parameters of the model and leads to a new paradigm for the interpretation of the burst structure, the IBS paradigm. It leads as well to a reconsideration of the relative roles of the afterglow and burst in GRBs by defining two new phases in this complex phenomenon: a) the injector phase, giving rise to the proper-GRB (P-GRB), and b) the beam-target phase, giving rise to the extended afterglow peak emission (E-APE) and to the afterglow. Such differentiation leads to a natural possible explanation of the bimodal distribution of GRBs observed by BATSE. The agreement with the observational data in regions extending from the horizon of the EMBH all the way out to the distant observer confirms the uniqueness of the model.
  • The GRB 991216 and its relevant data acquired from the BATSE experiment and RXTE and Chandra satellites are used as a prototypical case to test the theory linking the origin of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) to the process of vacuum polarization occurring during the formation phase of a black hole endowed with electromagnetic structure (EMBH). The relative space-time transformation paradigm (RSTT paradigm) is presented. It relates the observed signals of GRBs to their past light cones, defining the events on the worldline of the source essential for the interpretation of the data. Since GRBs present regimes with unprecedently large Lorentz $\gamma$ factor, also sharply varying with time, particular attention is given to the constitutive equations relating the four time variables: the comoving time, the laboratory time, the arrival time at the detector, duly corrected by the cosmological effects. This paradigm is at the very foundation of any possible interpretation of the data of GRBs.