• Future experiments seeking to measure the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) require stable and homogeneous magnetic fields. Normally these experiments use a coil internal to a passively magnetically shielded volume to generate the magnetic field. The stability of the magnetic field generated by the coil within the magnetically shielded volume may be influenced by a number of factors. The factor studied here is the dependence of the internally generated field on the magnetic permeability $\mu$ of the shield material. We provide measurements of the temperature-dependence of the permeability of the material used in a set of prototype magnetic shields, using experimental parameters nearer to those of nEDM experiments than previously reported in the literature. Our measurements imply a range of $\frac{1}{\mu}\frac{d\mu}{dT}$ from 0-2.7\%/K. Assuming typical nEDM experiment coil and shield parameters gives $\frac{\mu}{B_0}\frac{dB_0}{d\mu}=0.01$, resulting in a temperature dependence of the magnetic field in a typical nEDM experiment of $\frac{dB_0}{dT}=0-270$~pT/K for $B_0=1~\mu$T. The results are useful for estimating the necessary level of temperature control in nEDM experiments.
  • The effect of passive magnetic shielding on dc magnetic field gradients imposed by both external and internal sources is studied. It is found that for concentric cylindrical or spherical shells of high permeability material, higher order multipoles in the magnetic field are shielded progressively better, by a factor related to the order of the multipole. In regard to the design of internal coil systems for the generation of uniform internal fields, we show how one can take advantage of the coupling of the coils to the innermost magnetic shield to further optimize the uniformity of the field. These results demonstrate quantitatively a phenomenon that was previously well-known qualitatively: that the resultant magnetic field within a passively magnetically shielded region can be much more uniform than the applied magnetic field itself. Furthermore we provide formulae relevant to active magnetic compensation systems which attempt to stabilize the interior fields by sensing and cancelling the exterior fields close to the outermost magnetic shielding layer. Overall this work provides a comprehensive framework needed to analyze and optimize dc magnetic shields, serving as a theoretical and conceptual design guide as well as a starting point and benchmark for finite-element analysis.
  • Optical pumping of He-3 produces large (hyper) nuclear-spin polarizations independent of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) field strength. This allows lung MRI to be performed at reduced fields with many associated benefits, such as lower tissue susceptibility gradients and decreased power absorption rates. Here we present results of 2D imaging as well as accurate 1D gas diffusion mapping of the human lung using He-3 at very low field (3 mT). Furthermore, measurements of transverse relaxation in zero applied gradient are shown to accurately track pulmonary oxygen partial pressure, opening the way for novel imaging sequences.
  • We present measurements of the magnetic field dependence of the penetration depth Lambda(H) for untwinned YBa_2Cu_3O_6.95 for temperatures from 1.2 to 70 K in dc fields up to 42 gauss and directions 0, 45 and 90 degrees with respect to the crystal b-axis. The experiment uses an ac susceptometer with fields applied parallel to the ab-plane of thin platelet samples. The resolution is about 0.15 Angstroms in zero dc field, degrading to 0.2 or 0.3 Angstroms at the higher fields. At low temperatures the field dependencies are essentially linear in H, ranging from 0.04 Angstroms/gauss for Delta-Lambda_a to 0.10 Angstroms/gauss for Delta-Lambda_b, values comparable to the T=0 Yip and Sauls prediction for a d-wave superconductor. However, the systematics versus temperature and orientation do not agree with the d-wave scenario probably due, in part, to residual sample problems.