• In our ongoing multi-wavelength study of cluster AGN, we find ~75% of the spectroscopically identified cluster X-ray point sources (XPS) with L(0.3-8.0keV)>10^{42} erg s^{-1} and cluster radio galaxies with P(1.4 GHz) > 3x10^{23} W Hz^{-1} in 11 moderate redshift clusters (0.2<z<0.4) are located within 500 kpc from the cluster center. In addition, these sources are much more centrally concentrated than luminous cluster red sequence (CRS) galaxies. With the exception of one luminous X-ray source, we find that cluster XPSs are hosted by passive red sequence galaxies, have X-ray colors consistent with an AGN power-law spectrum, and have little intrinsic obscuring columns in the X-ray (in agreement with previous studies). Our cluster radio sources have properties similar to FR1s, but are not detected in X-ray probably because their predicted X-ray emission falls below our sensitivity limits. Based on the observational properties of our XPS population, we suggest that the cluster XPSs are low-luminosity BL Lac objects, and thus are beamed low-power FR 1s. Extrapolating the X-ray luminosity function of BL Lacs and the Radio luminosity function of FR 1s down to fainter radio and X-ray limits, we estimate that a large fraction, perhaps all CRSs with L>L* possess relativistic jets which can inject energy into the ICM, potentially solving the uniform heating problem in the central region of clusters.
  • Using Chandra imaging spectroscopy and VLA L-band maps, we have identified radio galaxies at P(1.4 GHz) >= 3x10^{23} W Hz^{-1} and X-ray point sources (XPSs) at L(0.3-8 keV) >= 10^{42} ergs s^{-1} in 11 moderate redshift (0.2<z<0.4) clusters of galaxies. Each cluster is uniquely chosen to have a total mass similar to predicted progenitors of the present-day Coma Cluster. Within a projected radius of 1 Mpc we detect 20 radio galaxies and 8 XPSs confirmed to be cluster members above these limits. 75% of these are detected within 500 kpc of the cluster center. This result is inconsistent with a random selection from bright, red sequence ellipticals at the > 99.999% level. All but one of the XPSs are hosted by luminous ellipticals which otherwise show no other evidence for AGN activity. These objects are unlikely to be highly obscured AGN since there is no evidence for large amounts of X-ray or optical absorption. The most viable model for these sources are low luminosity BL Lac Objects. The expected numbers of lower luminosity FR 1 radio galaxies and BL Lacs in our sample converge to suggest that very deep radio and X-ray images of rich clusters will detect AGN in a large fraction of bright elliptical galaxies in the inner 500 kpc. Because both the radio galaxies and the XPSs possess relativistic jets, they can inject heat into the ICM. Using the most recent scalings of P_jet ~ L_radio^{0.5} from Birzan et al. (2008), radio sources weaker than our luminosity limit probably contribute the majority of the heat to the ICM. If a majority of ICM heating is due to large numbers of low power radio sources, triggered into activity by the increasing ICM density as they move inward, this may be the feedback mechanism necessary to stabilize cooling in cluster cores.
  • A recently developed spectral-element adaptive refinement incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code [Rosenberg, Fournier, Fischer, Pouquet, J. Comp. Phys. 215, 59-80 (2006)] is applied to simulate the problem of MHD island coalescence instability (MICI) in two dimensions. MICI is a fundamental MHD process that can produce sharp current layers and subsequent reconnection and heating in a high-Lundquist number plasma such as the solar corona [Ng and Bhattacharjee, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 4028 (1998)]. Due to the formation of thin current layers, it is highly desirable to use adaptively or statically refined grids to resolve them, and to maintain accuracy at the same time. The output of the spectral-element static adaptive refinement simulations are compared with simulations using a finite difference method on the same refinement grids, and both methods are compared to pseudo-spectral simulations with uniform grids as baselines. It is shown that with the statically refined grids roughly scaling linearly with effective resolution, spectral element runs can maintain accuracy significantly higher than that of the finite difference runs, in some cases achieving close to full spectral accuracy.
  • The Collective Beam-Beam interaction is studied in the framework of maps with a ``kick-lattice'' model in the 4-D phase space of the transverse motion. A novel approach to the classical method of averaging is used to derive an approximate map which is equivalent to a flow within the averaging approximation. The flow equation is a continuous-time Vlasov equation which we call the averaged Vlasov equation, the new model of this paper. The power of this approach is evidenced by the fact that the averaged Vlasov equation has exact equilibria and the associated linearized equations have uncoupled azimuthal Fourier modes. The equation for the Fourier modes leads to a Fredholm integral equation of the third kind and the setting is ready-made for the development of a weakly nonlinear theory to study the coupling of the pi and sigma modes. The pi and sigma eigenmodes are calculated from the third kind integral equation. These results are compared with the kick-lattice model using our weighted macroparticle tracking code and a newly developed, density tracking, parallel, Perron-Frobenius code.
  • We present high sensitivity 12/13CO(1-0) molecular line maps covering the full extent of the parsec scale L1551 molecular outflow, including the redshifted east-west (EW) flow. We also present 12CO(3-2) data that extends over a good fraction of the area mapped in the 1-0 transition. We compare the molecular data to widefield, narrow-band optical emission in H$\alpha$. While there are multiple outflows in the L1551 cloud, the main outflow is oriented at 50\arcdeg position angle and appears to be driven by embedded source(s) in the central IRS 5 region. The 3-2 data indicate that there may be molecular emission associated with the L1551 NE jet, within the redshifted lobe of main outflow. We have also better defined the previously known EW flow and believe we have identified its blueshifted counterpart. We further speculate that the origin of the EW outflow lies near HH 102. We use velocity dependent opacity correction to estimate the mass and the energy of the outflow. The resulting mass spectral indices from our analysis, are systematically lower (less steep) than the power law indices obtained towards other outflows in several recent studies that use a similar opacity correction method. We show that systematic errors and biases in the analysis procedures for deriving mass spectra could result in errors in the determination of the power-law indices. The mass spectral indices, the morphological appearance of the position-velocity plots and integrated intensity emission maps of the molecular data, compared with the optical, suggest that jet-driven bow-shock entrainment is the best explanation for the driving mechanism of outflows in L1551. The kinetic energy of the outflows is found to be comparable to the binding energy of the cloud and sufficient to maintain the turbulence in the L1551 cloud.
  • We have studied morphological evolution in clusters simulated in the adiabatic limit and with radiative cooling. Cluster morphology in the redshift range, $0 < z < 0.5$, is quantified by multiplicity and ellipticity. In terms of ellipticity, our result indicates slow evolution in cluster shapes compared to those observed in the X-ray and optical wavelengths. The result is consistent with Floor, Melott & Motl (2003). In terms of multiplicity, however, the result indicate relatively stronger evolution (compared to ellipticity but still weaker than observation) in the structure of simulated clusters suggesting that for comparative studies of simulation and observation, sub-structure measures are more sensitive than the shape measures. We highlight a few possibilities responsible for the discrepancy in the shape evolution of simulated and real clusters.
  • Ultracold collisions of polar OH molecules are considered in the presence of an electrostatic field. The field exerts a strong influence on both elastic and state-changing inelastic collision rate constants, leading to clear experimental signatures that should help disentangle the theory of cold molecule collisions. Based on the collision rates we discuss the prospects for evaporative cooling of electrostatically trapped OH. We also find that the scattering properties at ultralow temperatures prove to be remarkably independent of the details of the short-range interaction, owing to avoided crossings in the long-range adiabatic potential curves. The behavior of the scattering rate constants is qualitatively understood in terms of a novel set of long-range states of the [OH]$_2$ dimer.
  • We present the first World Atlas of the zenith artificial night sky brightness at sea level. Based on radiance calibrated high resolution DMSP satellite data and on accurate modelling of light propagation in the atmosphere, it provides a nearly global picture of how mankind is proceeding to envelope itself in a luminous fog. Comparing the Atlas with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) population density database we determined the fraction of population who are living under a sky of given brightness. About two thirds of the World population and 99% of the population in US (excluding Alaska and Hawaii) and EU live in areas where the night sky is above the threshold set for polluted status. Assuming average eye functionality, about one fifth of the World population, more than two thirds of the US population and more than one half of the EU population have already lost naked eye visibility of the Milky Way. Finally, about one tenth of the World population, more than 40% of the US population and one sixth of the EU population no longer view the heavens with the eye adapted to night vision because the sky brightness.
  • We extend the method introduced by Cinzano et al. (2000a) to map the artificial sky brightness in large territories from DMSP satellite data, in order to map the naked eye star visibility and telescopic limiting magnitudes. For these purposes we take into account the altitude of each land area from GTOPO30 world elevation data, the natural sky brightness in the chosen sky direction, based on Garstang modelling, the eye capability with naked eye or a telescope, based on the Schaefer (1990) and Garstang (2000b) approach, and the stellar extinction in the visual photometric band. For near zenith sky directions we also take into account screening by terrain elevation. Maps of naked eye star visibility and telescopic limiting magnitudes are useful to quantify the capability of the population to perceive our Universe, to evaluate the future evolution, to make cross correlations with statistical parameters and to recognize areas where astronomical observations or popularisation can still acceptably be made. We present, as an application, maps of naked eye star visibility and total sky brightness in V band in Europe at the zenith with a resolution of approximately 1 km.
  • We present a method to map the artificial sky brightness across large territories in astronomical photometric bands with a resolution of approximately 1 km. This is useful to quantify the situation of night sky pollution, to recognize potential astronomical sites and to allow future monitoring of trends. The artificial sky brightness present in the chosen direction at a given position on the Earth's surface is obtained by the integration of the contributions produced by every surface area in the surrounding. Each contribution is computed based on detailed models for the propagation in the atmosphere of the upward light flux emitted by the area. The light flux is measured with top of atmosphere radiometric observations made by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System. We applied the described method to Europe obtaining the maps of artificial sky brightness in V and B bands.
  • We present theoretical arguments and simulation data indicating that the scaling of earthquake events in models of faults with long-range stress transfer is composed of at least three distinct regions. These regions correspond to three classes of earthquakes with different underlying physical mechanisms. In addition to the events that exhibit scaling, there are larger ``breakout'' events that are not on the scaling plot. We discuss the interpretation of these events as fluctuations in the vicinity of a spinodal critical point.
  • We present the map of the artificial sky brightness in Europe in V band with a resolution of approximately 1 km. The aim is to understand the state of night sky pollution in Europe, to quantify the present situation and to allow future monitoring of trends. The artificial sky brightness in each site at a given position on the sky is obtained by integration of the contributions produced by every surface area in the surroundings of the site. Each contribution is computed taking into account based on detailed models the propagation in the atmosphere of the upward light flux emitted by the area and measured by the Operational Linescan System of DMSP satellites. The modelling technique, introduced and developed by Garstang and also applied by Cinzano, takes into account the extinction along light paths, a double scattering of light from atmospheric molecules and aerosols, Earth curvature and allows to associate the predictions to the aerosol content of the atmosphere.
  • We present a project to map the artificial sky brightness in Europe in the main astronomical photometrical bands with a resolution better than 3 km. The aim is to understand the state of night sky pollution in Europe, to quantify the present situation and to allow future monitoring of trends. The artificial sky brightness in each site at a given position on the sky is obtained by the integration of the contributions produced by every surface area in the surroundings of the site. Each contribution is computed taking in account the propagation in the atmosphere of the upward light flux emitted by the area and measured from DMSP satellites. The project is a long term study in which we plan to take in account successively of many different details in order to improve the maps. We present, as a preliminary result, a map of the V-band artificial sky brightness in Italy in 1998 and we compare it with the map obtained 27 years earlier by Bertiau, Treanor and De Graeve. Predictions for the artificial sky brightness within the next 27 years are also shown.
  • We study the effects of the ionizing and dissociating photons produced by PopIII objects on the surrounding intergalactic medium. We find that the typical size of a H_2 photodissociated region, R_d ~ 1-5 kpc, is smaller than the mean distance between sources at z ~ 20-30, but larger than the ionized region by a factor depending on the detailed properties of the emission spectrum. This implies that clearing of intergalactic H_2 occurs before reionization of the universe is complete. In the same redshift range, the soft-UV background in the Lyman-Werner bands, when the intergalactic H and H_2 opacity is included, is found to be J_LW ~ 1d-30 - 1d-27 erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} Hz^{-1}. This value is well below the threshold required for the negative feedback of PopIII objects on the subsequent galaxy formation to be effective in that redshift range.
  • We have prepared the internal states of two trapped ions in both the Bell-like singlet and triplet entangled states. In contrast to all other experiments with entangled states of either massive particles or photons, we do this in a deterministic fashion, producing entangled states on demand without selection. The deterministic production of entangled states is a crucial prerequisite for large-scale quantum computation.
  • Using a combination of first-principles total energies, a cluster expansion technique, and Monte Carlo simulations, we have studied the Li/Co ordering in LiCoO_2 and Li-vacancy/Co ordering in CoO_2. We find: (i) A ground state search of the space of substitutional cation configurations yields the (layered) CuPt structure as the lowest-energy state in the octahedral system LiCoO_2 (and CoO_2), in agreement with the experimentally observed phase. (ii) Finite temperature calculations predict that the solid-state order- disorder transitions for LiCoO_2 and CoO_2 occur at temperatures (~5100 K and ~4400 K, respectively) much higher than melting, thus making these transitions experimentally inaccessible. (iii) The energy of the reaction E(LiCoO_2) - E(CoO_2) - E(Li) gives the average battery voltage V of a Li_xCoO_2/Li cell. Searching the space of configurations for large average voltages, we find that CuPt (a monolayer <111> superlattice) has a high voltage (V=3.78 V), but that this could be increased by cation randomization (V=3.99 V), partial disordering (V=3.86 V), or by forming a 2-layer Li_2Co_2O_4 superlattice along <111> (V=4.90 V).