• Young planets with masses approaching Jupiter's have tides strong enough to clear gaps around their orbits in the protostellar disk. Gas flow through the gaps regulates the planets' further growth and governs the disks' evolution. Magnetic forces may drive that flow if the gas is sufficiently ionized to couple to the fields. We compute the ionizing effects of the X-rays from the central young star, using Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations to find the spectrum of Compton-scattered photons reaching the planet's vicinity. The scattered X-rays ionize the gas at rates similar to or greater than the interstellar cosmic ray rate near planets the mass of Saturn and of Jupiter, located at 5 au and at 10 au, in disks with the interstellar mass fraction of sub-micron dust and with the dust depleted a factor 100. Solving a simplified gas-grain recombination reaction network yields charged particle populations whose ability to carry currents is sufficient to partly couple the magnetic fields to the gas around the planet. However the material near the planet's orbit has ambipolar and/or Hall diffusivity so large in all the cases we examine that the non-ideal terms dominate the magnetic field's evolution. Thus the flow of gas in the gaps opened by the giant planets depends critically on the finite conductivity and its spatial variation.
  • Turbulence is the leading candidate for angular momentum transport in protoplanetary disks and therefore influences disk lifetimes and planet formation timescales. However, the turbulent properties of protoplanetary disks are poorly constrained observationally. Simon et al. (2015) suggested that the ratio of the peak line flux to the flux at line center of the CO J=3-2 transition is a reasonable diagnostic of turbulence, while Flaherty et al. (2015) and Flaherty et al. (2017) found turbulent speeds in HD 163296 smaller than what fully-developed MRI would produce based on the Simon et al. (2015) simulation results. Yet Simon et al. (2015) and Flaherty et al. (2015) assumed a constant CO/H2 ratio of 0.0001 in locations where CO is not frozen-out or photodissociated. Yu et al. (2016) found that the CO abundance varies both with distance from the star and as a function of time because CO molecules are gradually dissociated, with the liberated carbon forming complex organic molecules that freeze out on grain surfaces. We simulate the emission lines of CO based on chemical evolution models presented in Yu et al. (2016), and find that the peak-to-trough ratio changes as a function of time as CO is destroyed. Specifically, a CO-depleted disk with high turbulent velocity mimics the peak-to-trough ratios of a non-CO-depleted disk with lower turbulent velocity. We suggest that disk observers and modelers take into account the possibility of CO depletion when using line peak-to-trough ratios to constrain the degree of turbulence in disks. Assuming that CO/H2 = 0.0001 at all disk radii can lead to underestimates of turbulent speeds in the disk by at least 0.2 km/s.
  • We present hemispherically resolved spectra of the surface of Europa from ~3.1--4.13 microns, which we obtained using the near infrared spectrometer NIRSPEC on the Keck II telescope. These include the first high-quality L-band spectra of the surface to extend beyond 4 microns. In our data we identify a previously unseen spectral feature at 3.78 microns on the trailing hemisphere. The longitudinal distribution of the feature is consistent with that of a radiolytic product created by electron or Iogenic ion bombardment. This feature is coincident with an absorption feature of SO2 frost seen in both laboratory spectra and spectra of Io. However, the corresponding, typically stronger 4.07 micron feature of SO2 frost is absent from our data. This result is contrary to the suggested detection of SO2 at 4.05 microns in Galileo NIMS data of the trailing hemisphere, which was severely affected by radiation noise. We use simple spectral modeling to argue that the 3.78 micron feature is not easily explained by the presence of SO2 frost on the surface. We explore alternative explanations and discuss other potential candidate species.
  • The pre-main-sequence evolution of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs is studied numerically starting from the formation of a protostellar/proto-brown dwarf seed and taking into account the mass accretion onto the central object during the initial several Myr of evolution. The stellar evolution was computed using the STELLAR evolution code developed by Yorke & Bodenheimer with recent modifications by Hosokawa et al. The mass accretion rates were taken from numerical hydrodynamics models of Vorobyov & Basu computing the circumstellar disk evolution starting from the gravitational collapse of pre-stellar cloud cores of various mass and angular momentum. The resulting stellar evolution tracks were compared with the isochrones and isomasses calculated using non-accreting models. We find that mass accretion in the initial several Myr of protostellar evolution can have a strong effect on the subsequent evolution of young stars and brown dwarfs. The disagreement between accreting and non-accreting models in terms of the total stellar luminosity L_st, stellar radius R_st and effective temperature T_eff depends on the thermal efficiency of accretion, i.e., on the fraction of accretion energy absorbed by the central object. The largest mismatch is found for the cold accretion case, in which essentially all accretion energy is radiated away. The relative deviations in L_st and R_st in this case can reach 50% for 1.0-Myr-old objects and remain notable even for 10-Myr-old objects. In the hot and hybrid accretion cases, in which a constant fraction of accretion energy is absorbed, the disagreement between accreting and non-accreting models becomes less pronounced, but still remains notable for 1.0-Myr-old objects. These disagreements may lead to the wrong age estimate for objects of (sub-)solar mass when using the isochrones based on non-accreting models (abridged).
  • We report the discovery and analysis of the most metal-poor damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) system currently known, based on observations made with the Keck HIRES spectrograph. The metal paucity of this system has only permitted the determination of three element abundances: [C/H] = -3.43 +/- 0.06, [O/H] = -3.05 +/- 0.05, and [Si/H] = -3.21 +/- 0.05, as well as an upper limit on the abundance of iron: [Fe/H] < -2.81. This DLA is among the most carbon-poor environment currently known with detectable metals. By comparing the abundance pattern of this DLA to detailed models of metal-free nucleosynthesis, we find that the chemistry of the gas is consistent with the yields of a 20.5 M_sun metal-free star that ended its life as a core-collapse supernova; the abundances we measure are inconsistent with the yields of pair-instability supernovae. Such a tight constraint on the mass of the progenitor Population III star is afforded by the well-determined C/O ratio, which we show depends almost monotonically on the progenitor mass when the kinetic energy of the supernova explosion is E_exp > 1.5x10^51 erg. We find that the DLA presented here has just crossed the critical 'transition discriminant' threshold, rendering the DLA gas now suitable for low mass star formation. We also discuss the chemistry of this system in the context of recent models that suggest some of the most metal-poor DLAs are the precursors of the 'first galaxies', and are the antecedents of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies.
  • We consider an M/M/N/K/FCFS system (N>0, K>=N), where the servers operate at (possibly) heterogeneous service rates. In this situation, the steady state behavior depends on the routing policy that is used to select which idle server serves the next job in queue. We define a class of idle-time-order-based policies (including, for example, Longest Idle Server First (LISF)) and show that all policies in this class result in the same steady state behavior. In particular, they are all equivalent to the naive Random routing policy.
  • The known members of the class of hyperluminous X-ray sources (HLXs) are few in number, yet they are of great interest as they are regarded as the likeliest intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) candidates amongst the wider population of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Here we report optical photometry and spectroscopy of a HLX candidate associated with the galaxy IC 4320, that reveal it is a background AGN. We discuss the implications of the exclusion of this object from the small number of well-studied HLXs, that appears to accentuate the difference in characteristics between the good IMBH candidate ESO 243-49 HLX-1 and the small handful of other HLXs.
  • We report the discovery of deuterium absorption in the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.88) damped Lyman-alpha system at z_abs = 3.06726 toward the QSO SDSS J1358+6522. On the basis of 13 resolved D I absorption lines and the damping wings of the H I Lyman alpha transition, we have obtained a new, precise measure of the primordial abundance of deuterium. Furthermore, to bolster the present statistics of precision D/H measures, we have reanalyzed all of the known deuterium absorption-line systems that satisfy a set of strict criteria. We have adopted a blind analysis strategy (to remove human bias), and developed a software package that is specifically designed for precision D/H abundance measurements. For this reanalyzed sample of systems, we obtain a weighted mean of (D/H)_p = (2.53 +/- 0.04) x 10^-5, corresponding to a Universal baryon density100 Omega_b h^2 = 2.202 +/- 0.046 for the standard model of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. By combining our measure of (D/H)_p with observations of the cosmic microwave background, we derive the effective number of light fermion species, N_eff = 3.28 +/- 0.28. We therefore rule out the existence of an additional (sterile) neutrino (i.e. N_eff = 4.046) at 99.3 percent confidence (2.7 sigma), provided that N_eff and the baryon-to-photon ratio (eta_10) did not change between BBN and recombination. We also place a strong bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, xi_D = +0.05 +/- 0.13 based only on the CMB+(D/H)_p observations. Combining xi_D with the current best literature measure of Y_p, we find |xi| <= +0.062. In future, improved measurements of several key reaction rates, in particular d(p,gamma)3He, and further measures of (D/H)_p with a precision comparable to those considered here, should allow even more stringent limits to be placed on new physics beyond the standard model.
  • The location of warm dust producing the Mid-infrared (MIR) emission in Type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) is complex and not yet fully known. We explore this problem by studying how the MIR covering factor (CF_{MIR} =L_{MIR}/L_{bol}) correlates with the fundamental parameters of AGN accretion process (such as L_{bol}, black hole mass MBH, and Eddington ratio L/LEdd) and the properties of narrow emission lines (as represented by [O III] 5007), using large data sets derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS) and the Wide Infrared Sky Survey (WISE). Firstly we find that the luminosity of the [O III] wing component (Lwing) correlates more tightly with the continuum luminosity (L5100) than the luminosity of the line core component (Lcore) does, which is in line with our previous conclusion that the wing component, generally blueshifted, originates from the polar outflows in the inner narrow-line region (NLR). We then find that the MIR CF shows the strongest correlation with Lwing/L_{bol} rather than with Lcore/L_{bol} or the above fundamental AGN parameters, and the correlation becomes stronger as the infrared wavelength increases. We also confirm the anti-correlations of CF_{MIR} with L_{bol} and MBH, and the lack of dependence of CF_{MIR} on the Eddington ratio. These results suggest that a large fraction of the warm dust producing MIR emission in AGNs is likely embedded in polar outflows in the NLR instead of in the torus.
  • The primary goal of the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) is to find well screened galaxy candidates at z>7 (z' dropout) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDFS). To this end, TENIS provides relatively deep J and Ks data (~25.3 ABmag, 5-sigma) for an area of 0.5*0.5 degree. Leveraged with existing data at mid-infrared to optical wavelengths, this allows us to screen for the most luminous high-z objects, which are rare and thus require a survey over a large field to be found. We introduce new color selection criteria to select a z>7 sample with minimal contaminations from low-z galaxies and Galactic cool stars; to reduce confusion in the relatively low angular resolution IRAC images, we introduce a novel deconvolution method to measure the IRAC fluxes of individual sources. Illustrating perhaps the effectiveness at which we screen out interlopers, we find only one z>7 candidate, TENIS-ZD1. The candidate has a weighted z_phot of 7.8, and its colors and luminosity indicate a young (45M years old) starburst galaxy with a stellar mass of 3.2*10^10 M_sun. The result matches with the observational luminosity function analysis and the semi-analytic simulation result based on the Millennium Simulations, which may over predict the volume density for high-z massive galaxies. The existence of TENIS-ZD1, if confirmed spectroscopically to be at z>7, therefore poses a challenge to current theoretical models for how so much mass can accumulate in a galaxy at such a high redshift.
  • As part of the NASA-CNES agreement, the NASA Star and Exoplanet Database (NStED) serves as the official US portal for the public CoRoT data products. NStED is a general purpose archive with the aim of providing support for NASA's planet finding and characterization goals. Consequently, the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) developed, and NStED adapted, a periodogram service for CoRoT data to determine periods of variability phenomena and create phased photometric light curves. Through the NStED periodogram interface, the user may choose three different period detection algorithms to use on any photometric time series product, or even upload and analyze their own data. Additionally, the NStED periodogram is remotely accessed by the CoRoT archive as part of its interface. NStED is available at {\bf http://nsted.ipac.caltech.edu}.
  • Kepler is a space telescope that searches Sun-like stars for planets. Its major goal is to determine {\eta}_Earth, the fraction of Sunlike stars that have planets like Earth. When a planet 'transits' or moves in front of a star, Kepler can measure the concomitant dimming of the starlight. From analysis of the first four months of those measurements for over 150,000 stars, Kepler's science team has determined sizes, surface temperatures, orbit sizes and periods for over a thousand new planet candidates. In this paper, we characterize the period probability distribution function of the super-Earth and Neptune planet candidates with periods up to 132 days, and find three distinct period regimes. For candidates with periods below 3 days the density increases sharply with increasing period; for periods between 3 and 30 days the density rises more gradually with increasing period, and for periods longer than 30 days, the density drops gradually with increasing period. We estimate that 1% to 3% of stars like the Sun are expected to have Earth analog planets, based on the Kepler data release of Feb 2011. This estimate of is based on extrapolation from a fiducial subsample of the Kepler planet candidates that we chose to be nominally 'complete' (i.e., no missed detections) to the realm of the Earth-like planets, by means of simple power law models. The accuracy of the extrapolation will improve as more data from the Kepler mission is folded in. Accurate knowledge of {\eta}_Earth is essential for the planning of future missions that will image and take spectra of Earthlike planets. Our result that Earths are relatively scarce means that a substantial effort will be needed to identify suitable target stars prior to these future missions.
  • We report the discovery of a significant excess of candidate Halpha emitters (HAEs) in the field of the radio galaxy 4C 23.56 at z=2.483. Using the MOIRCS near-infrared imager on the Subaru Telescope we found 11 candidate emission-line galaxies to a flux limit of ~7.5 10^-17 erg s-1 cm-2, which is about 5 times excess from the expected field counts with ~3-sigma significance. Three of these are spectroscopically confirmed as redshifted Halpha at z=2.49. The distribution of candidate emitters on the sky is tightly confined to a 1.2-Mpc-radius area at z=2.49, locating 4C 23.56 at the western edge of the distribution. Analysis of the deep Spitzer MIPS 24 mu m imaging shows that there is also an excess of faint MIPS sources. All but two of the 11 HAEs are also found in the MIPS data. The inferred star-formation rate (SFR) of the HAEs based on the extinction-corrected Halpha luminosity (median SFR >~100 M_solar yr-1) is similar to those of HAEs in random fields at z~2. On the other hand, the MIPS-based SFR for the HAEs is on average 3.6 times larger, suggesting the existence of the star-formation significanly obscured by dust. The comparison of the Halpha-based star-formation activities of the HAEs in the 4C 23.56 field to those in another proto-cluster around PKS 1138-262 at z=2.16 reveals that the latter tend to have fainter Halpha emission despite similar K-band magnitudes. This suggests that star-formation may be suppressed in the PKS 1138-262 protocluster relative to the 4C 23.56 protocluster. This difference among the HAEs in the two proto-clusters at z > 2 may imply that some massive cluster galaxies are just forming at these epochs with some variation among clusters.
  • This expository review is devoted to fish swimming and bird/insect flight. (i) The simple waving motion of an elongated flexible ribbon plate of constant width, immersed in a fluid at rest, propagating a wave distally down the plate to swim forward is first considered to provide a fundamental concept on energy conservation. It is generalized to include variations in body width and thickness, vortex shedding from appended dorsal, ventral and caudal fins to closely simulate fish swimming for which a nonlinear theory is presented for large-amplitude propulsion. (ii) For bird flight, the pioneering studies on oscillating rigid wings are briefed, followed by presenting a nonlinear unsteady theory for flexible wing with arbitrary variations in shape and trajectory with a comparative study with experiments. (iii) For insect flight, more recent advances are reviewed under aerodynamic theory and modeling, computational methods, and experiments, on forward and hovering flights with producing leading-edge vortex to give unsteady high lift. (iv) Prospects are explored on extracting intrinsic flow energy by fish and bird to gain thrust for propulsion. (v) The mechanical and biological principles are drawn together for unified studies on the energetics in deriving metabolic power for animal locomotion, leading to a surprising discovery that the hydrodynamic viscous drag on swimming fish is largely associated with laminar boundary layers, thus drawing valid and sound evidences for a resolution to the fish-swim paradox proclaimed by Gray (1936, 1968).
  • Little is known about the properties of extremely massive HI-galaxies. They are extremely scarce and are - according to hierarchical structure formation - only forming now (z < 1). The forthcoming deep HI SKA Pathfinders surveys will uncover many more of them. This will lead to a better understanding of their evolution and frequency, and the shape of the bright end of the HI mass function. The recently discovered galaxy HIZOA J0836-43 is one of the most HI-rich galaxies (M(HI)=7.5 x 10^10Msun - and the nearest of its kind. As such it is an ideal local probe of these elusive galaxies. Results from a detailed investigation in the near- (IRSF) and far-infrared (Spitzer) of this local HI-massive galaxy are presented. Unlike other giant HI galaxies, it is not of low surface brightness. The galaxy is found to be a luminous starbursting galaxy at an unexpected early stage of stellar mass building, more typical of star-forming galaxies at higher redshift (z~0.7). With regard to its environment, hence possible clues to its formation, the near infrared imaging survey finds HIZOAJ0836-43 to lie in a region underdense in L* galaxies - consistent with the observation that HI-massive galaxies are preferentially found in low density regions - in the presence, however, of an uncommonly large number of low stellar mass galaxies.
  • Transiting extrasolar planets provide an opportunity to study the mass-radius relation of planets as well as their internal structure. The existence of a secondary eclipse enables further study of the thermal properties of the the planet by observing at infrared wavelengths. The probability of an observable secondary eclipse depends upon the orbital parameters of the planet, particularly eccentricity and argument of periastron. Here we provide analytical expressions for these probabilities, investigate their properties, and calculate their values for the known extrasolar planets. We furthermore quantitatively discuss constraints on existence and observability of primary transits if a secondary eclipse is observed. Finally, we calculate the a-posteriori transit probabilities of the known extrasolar planets, and we present several case studies in which orbital constraints resulting from the presence of a secondary eclipse may be applied in observing campaigns.
  • Astrometry can detect rocky planets in a broad range of masses and orbital distances and measure their masses and three-dimensional orbital parameters, including eccentricity and inclination, to provide the properties of terrestrial planets. The masses of both the new planets and the known gas giants can be measured unambiguously, allowing a direct calculation of the gravitational interactions, both past and future. Such dynamical interactions inform theories of the formation and evolution of planetary systems, including Earth-like planets. Astrometry is the only technique technologically ready to detect planets of Earth mass in the habitable zone (HZ) around solar-type stars within 20 pc. These Earth analogs are close enough for follow-up observations to characterize the planets by infrared imaging and spectroscopy with planned future missions such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the Terrestrial Planet Finder/Darwin. Employing a demonstrated astrometric precision of 1 microarcsecond and a noise floor under 0.1 micro-arcseconds, SIM Lite can make multiple astrometric measurements of the nearest 60 F-, G-, and K-type stars during a five-year mission. SIM Lite directly tests theories of rocky planet formation and evolution around Sun-like stars and identifies the nearest potentially habitable planets for later spaceborne imaging, e.g., with Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin. SIM was endorsed by the two recent Decadal Surveys and it meets the highest-priority goal of the 2008 AAAC Exoplanet Task Force.
  • We present the first Chandra/ACIS imaging study of the circumnuclear region of the nearby Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365. The X-ray emission is resolved into point-like sources and complex, extended emission. The X-ray morphology of the extended emission shows a biconical soft X-ray emission region extending ~5 kpc in projection from the nucleus, coincident with the high excitation outflow cones seen in optical emission lines particularly to the northwest. Harder X-ray emission is detected from a kpc-diameter circumnuclear ring, coincident with the star-forming ring prominent in the Spitzer mid-infrared images; this X-ray emission is partially obscured by the central dust lane of NGC 1365. Spectral fitting of spatially separated components indicates a thermal plasma origin for the soft extended X-ray emission (kT=0.57 keV). Only a small amount of this emission can be due to photoionization by the nuclear source. Detailed comparison with [OIII]5007 observations shows the hot interstellar medium (ISM) is spatially anticorrelated with the [OIII] emitting clouds and has thermal pressures comparable to those of the [OIII] medium, suggesting that the hot ISM acts as a confining medium for the cooler photoionized clouds. The abundance ratios of the hot ISM are fully consistent with the theoretical values for enrichment from Type II supernovae, suggesting that the hot ISM is a wind from the starburst circumnuclear ring. X-ray emission from a ~450 pc long nuclear radio jet is also detected to the southeast.
  • We have performed a survey of the Kuiper belt covering ~ 1/3 a square degree of the sky using Suprime-cam on the Subaru telescope, to a limiting magnitude of m(R)~ 26.8 (50% threshold) and have found 36 new KBOs. We have confirmed that the luminosity function of the Kuiper belt must break as previously observed (Bernstein et al. 2004; Fuentes & Holman 2008). From the luminosity function, we have inferred the underlying size distribution and find that it is consistent with a large object power-law slope q1~4.8 that breaks to a slope q2~1.9 at object diameter Db~60 km assuming 6% albedos. We have found no conclusive evidence that the size distribution of KBOs with inclinations i<5 is different than that of those with i>5. We discuss implications of this measurement for early accretion in the outer solar system and Neptune migration scenarios.
  • Mutual quasi-periodicities near the solar-rotation period appear in time series based on the Earth's magnetic field, the interplanetary magnetic field, and signed solar-magnetic fields. Dominant among these is one at 27.03 +/- 0.02 days that has been highlighted by Neugebauer, et al. 2000, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 2315. Extension of their study in time and to different data reveals decadal epochs during which the ~ 27.0 day, a ~ 28.3 day, or other quasi-periods dominate the signal. Space-time eigenvalue analyses of time series in 30 solar latitude bands, based on synoptic maps of unsigned photospheric fields, lead to two maximally independent modes that account for almost 30% of the data variance. One mode spans 45 degrees of latitude in the northern hemisphere and the other one in the southern. The modes rotate around the Sun rigidly, not differentially, suggesting connection with the subsurface dynamo. Spectral analyses yield familiar dominant quasi periods 27.04 +/- 0.03 days in the North and at 28.24 +/- 0.03 days in the South. These are replaced during cycle 23 by one at 26.45 +/- 0.03 days in the North. The modes show no tendency for preferred longitudes separated by ~ 180 degrees.
  • We report the first study of the depolarization behavior of spin polarized 3He in a mixture of 3He-4He at a temperature below the 4He Lambda point in a deuterated TetraPhenyl Butadiene-doped deuterated PolyStyrene (dTPB-dPS) coated acrylic cell. In our experiment the measured 3He relaxation time is due to the convolution of the 3He longitudinal relaxation time, T1, and the diffusion time constant of 3He in superfluid 4He since depolarization takes place on the walls. We have obtained a 3He relaxation time ~3000 seconds at a temperature around 1.9K. We have shown that it's possible to achieve values of wall depolarization probability on the order of (1-2)x10^-7 for polarized 3He in the superfluid 4He from a dTPB-dPS coated acrylic surface.
  • We quantify the intrinsic width of the red giant branches of three massive globular clusters in M31 in a search for metallicity spreads within these objects. We present HST/ACS observations of three massive clusters in M31, G78, G213, and G280. A thorough description of the photometry extraction and calibration is presented. After derivation of the color-magnitude diagrams, we quantify the intrinsic width of the red giant branch of each cluster. This width translates into a metallicity dispersion that indicates a complex star formation history for this type of system. For G78, sigma_[Fe/H]}=0.86 \pm 0.37; for G213, 0.89 \pm 0.20; and for G280, 1.03 \pm 0.26. We find that the metallicity dispersion of the clusters does not scale with mean metallicity. We also find no trend with the cluster mass. We discuss some possible formation scenarios that would explain our results.
  • Nine supergiant shells (SGSs) have been identified in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) based on H-alpha images, and twenty-three SGSs have been reported based on HI 21-cm line observations, but these sets do not always identify the same structures. We have examined the physical structure of the optically identified SGSs using HI channel maps and P-V diagrams to analyze the gas kinematics. There is good evidence for seven of the nine optically identified SGSs to be true shells. Of these seven H-alpha SGSs, four are the ionized inner walls of HI SGSs, while three are an ionized portion of a larger and more complex HI structure. All of the H-alpha SGSs are identified as such because they have OB associations along the periphery or in the center, with younger OB associations more often found along the periphery. After roughly 12 Myrs, if no new OB associations have been formed a SGS will cease to be identifiable at visible wavelengths. Thus, the presence and location of ionizing sources is the main distinction between shells seen only in HI and those also seen in H-alpha. Based on our analysis, H-alpha observations alone cannot unambiguously identify SGSs, especially in distant galaxies.
  • We present the first mid-infrared (5.5-14.5 micron) spectrum of a highly magnetic cataclysmic variable, EF Eridani, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectrum displays a relatively flat, featureless continuum. A spectral energy distribution model consisting of a 9500 K white dwarf, L5 secondary star, cyclotron emission corresponding to a B~13 MG white dwarf magnetic field, and an optically thin circumbinary dust disk is in reasonable agreement with the extant 2MASS, IRAC, and IRS observations of EF Eri. Cyclotron emission is ruled out as a dominant contributor to the infrared flux density at wavelengths >3 microns. The spectral energy distribution longward of ~5 microns is dominated by dust emission. Even longer wavelength observations would test the model's prediction of a continuing gradual decline in the circumbinary disk-dominated region of the spectral energy distribution.
  • In papers I and II in this series, we presented hydrodynamical simulations of jet models with parameters representative of the symbiotic system MWC 560. These were simulations of a pulsed, initially underdense jet in a high density ambient medium. Since the pulsed emission of the jet creates internal shocks and since the jet velocity is very high, the jet bow shock and the internal shocks are heated to high temperatures and should therefore emit X-ray radiation. In this paper, we investigate in detail the X-ray properties of the jets in our models. We have focused our study on the total X-ray luminosity and its temporal variability, the resulting spectra and the spatial distribution of the emission. Temperature and density maps from our hydrodynamical simulations with radiative cooling presented in the second paper are used together with emissivities calculated with the atomic database ATOMDB. The jets in our models show extended and variable X-ray emission which can be characterized as a sum of hot and warm components with temperatures that are consistent with observations of CH Cyg and R Aqr. The X-ray spectra of our model jets show emission line features which correspond to observed features in the spectra of CH Cyg. The innermost parts of our pulsed jets show iron line emission in the 6.4 - 6.7 keV range which may explain such emission from the central source in R Aqr. We conclude that MWC 560 should be detectable with Chandra or XMM-Newton, and such X-ray observations will provide crucial for understanding jets in symbiotic stars.