• In this paper we report a clustering analysis of upper main-sequence stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using data from the VMC survey (the VISTA near-infrared YJKs survey of the Magellanic system). Young stellar structures are identified as surface overdensities on a range of significance levels. They are found to be organized in a hierarchical pattern, such that larger structures at lower significance levels contain smaller ones at higher significance levels. They have very irregular morphologies, with a perimeter-area dimension of 1.44 +/- 0.02 for their projected boundaries. They have a power-law mass-size relation, power-law size/mass distributions, and a lognormal surface density distribution. We derive a projected fractal dimension of 1.48 +/- 0.03 from the mass-size relation, or of 1.4 +/- 0.1 from the size distribution, reflecting significant lumpiness of the young stellar structures. These properties are remarkably similar to those of a turbulent interstellar medium (ISM), supporting a scenario of hierarchical star formation regulated by supersonic turbulence.
  • Star formation is a hierarchical process, forming young stellar structures of star clusters, associations, and complexes over a wide scale range. The star-forming complex in the bar region of the Large Magellanic Cloud is investigated with upper main-sequence stars observed by the VISTA Survey of the Magellanic Clouds. The upper main-sequence stars exhibit highly non-uniform distributions. Young stellar structures inside the complex are identified from the stellar density map as density enhancements of different significance levels. We find that these structures are hierarchically organized such that larger, lower-density structures contain one or several smaller, higher-density ones. They follow power-law size and mass distributions as well as a lognormal surface density distribution. All these results support a scenario of hierarchical star formation regulated by turbulence. The temporal evolution of young stellar structures is explored by using subsamples of upper main-sequence stars with different magnitude and age ranges. While the youngest subsample, with a median age of log($\tau$/yr)~=~7.2, contains most substructure, progressively older ones are less and less substructured. The oldest subsample, with a median age of log($\tau$/yr)~=~8.0, is almost indistinguishable from a uniform distribution on spatial scales of 30--300~pc, suggesting that the young stellar structures are completely dispersed on a timescale of $\sim$100~Myr. These results are consistent with the characteristics of the 30~Doradus complex and the entire Large Magellanic Cloud, suggesting no significant environmental effects. We further point out that the fractal dimension may be method-dependent for stellar samples with significant age spreads.
  • The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) are unique local laboratories for studying the formation and evolution of small galaxies in exquisite detail. The Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) is an NOAO community DECam survey of the Clouds mapping 480 square degrees (distributed over ~2400 square degrees at ~20% filling factor) to ~24th mag in ugriz with the goal of identifying broadly distributed, low surface brightness stellar populations associated with the stellar halos and tidal debris of the Clouds. SMASH will also derive spatially-resolved star formation histories covering all ages out to large radii from the MCs that will further complement our understanding of their formation. Here, we present a summary of the survey, its data reduction, and a description of the first public Data Release (DR1). The SMASH DECam data have been reduced with a combination of the NOAO Community Pipeline, PHOTRED, an automated PSF photometry pipeline based mainly on the DAOPHOT suite, and custom calibration software. The attained astrometric precision is ~15 mas and the accuracy is ~2 mas with respect to the Gaia DR1 astrometric reference frame. The photometric precision is ~0.5-0.7% in griz and ~1% in u with a calibration accuracy of ~1.3% in all bands. The median 5 sigma point source depths in ugriz bands are 23.9, 24.8, 24.5, 24.2, 23.5 mag. The SMASH data already have been used to discover the Hydra II Milky Way satellite, the SMASH 1 old globular cluster likely associated with the LMC, and very extended stellar populations around the LMC out to R~18.4 kpc. SMASH DR1 contains measurements of ~100 million objects distributed in 61 fields. A prototype version of the NOAO Data Lab provides data access, including a data discovery tool, SMASH database access, an image cutout service, and a Jupyter notebook server with example notebooks for exploratory analysis.
  • The 32 Orionis group was discovered almost a decade ago and despite the fact that it represents the first northern, young (age ~ 25 Myr) stellar aggregate within 100 pc of the Sun ($d \simeq 93$ pc), a comprehensive survey for members and detailed characterisation of the group has yet to be performed. We present the first large-scale spectroscopic survey for new (predominantly M-type) members of the group after combining kinematic and photometric data to select candidates with Galactic space motion and positions in colour-magnitude space consistent with membership. We identify 30 new members, increasing the number of known 32 Ori group members by a factor of three and bringing the total number of identified members to 46, spanning spectral types B5 to L1. We also identify the lithium depletion boundary (LDB) of the group, i.e. the luminosity at which lithium remains unburnt in a coeval population. We estimate the age of the 32 Ori group independently using both isochronal fitting and LDB analyses and find it is essentially coeval with the {\beta} Pictoris moving group, with an age of $24\pm4$ Myr. Finally, we have also searched for circumstellar disc hosts utilising the AllWISE catalogue. Although we find no evidence for warm, dusty discs, we identify several stars with excess emission in the WISE W4-band at 22 {\mu}m. Based on the limited number of W4 detections we estimate a debris disc fraction of $32^{+12}_{-8}$ per cent for the 32 Ori group.
  • We present new deep UBVRI images and high-resolution multi-object optical spectroscopy of the young (~ 6 - 10 Myr old), relatively nearby (800 pc) open cluster IC 2395. We identify nearly 300 cluster members and use the photometry to estimate their spectral types, which extend from early B to middle M. We also present an infrared imaging survey of the central region using the IRAC and MIPS instruments on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, covering the wavelength range from 3.6 to 24 microns. Our infrared observations allow us to detect dust in circumstellar disks originating over a typical range of radii ~ 0.1 to ~ 10AU from the central star. We identify 18 Class II, 8 transitional disk, and 23 debris disk candidates, respectively 6.5%, 2.9%, and 8.3% of the cluster members with appropriate data. We apply the same criteria for transitional disk identification to 19 other stellar clusters and associations spanning ages from ~ 1 to ~ 18 Myr. We find that the number of disks in the transitional phase as a fraction of the total with strong 24 micron excesses ([8] - [24] > 1.5) increases from 8.4 +\- 1.3% at ~ 3 Myr to 46 +\- 5% at ~ 10 Myr. Alternative definitions of transitional disks will yield different percentages but should show the same trend.
  • In this contribution I will discuss fundamental stellar parameters as determined from young star clusters; specifically those with ages less than or approximately equal to that of the Pleiades. I will focus primarily on the use of stellar evolutionary models to determine the ages and masses of stars, as well as discuss the limitations of such models using a combination of both young clusters and eclipsing binary systems. In addition, I will also highlight a few interesting recent results from large on-going spectroscopic surveys (specifically Gaia-ESO and APOGEE/IN-SYNC) which are continuing to challenge our understanding of the formation and early evolutionary stages of young clusters.
  • We present a self-consistent, absolute isochronal age scale for young (< 200 Myr), nearby (< 100 pc) moving groups, which is consistent with recent lithium depletion boundary ages for both the Beta Pic and Tucana-Horologium moving groups. This age scale was derived using a set of semi-empirical pre-main-sequence model isochrones that incorporate an empirical colour-Teff relation and bolometric corrections based on the observed colours of Pleiades members, with theoretical corrections for the dependence on log g. Absolute ages for young, nearby groups are vital as these regions play a crucial role in our understanding of the early evolution of low- and intermediate-mass stars, as well as providing ideal targets for direct imaging and other measurements of dusty debris discs, substellar objects and, of course, extrasolar planets.
  • We investigate the nature of the unusual eclipsing star OGLE LMC-ECL-11893 (OGLE J05172127-6900558) in the Large Magellanic Cloud recently reported by Dong et al. 2014. The eclipse period for this star is 468 days, and the eclipses exhibit a minimum of ~1.4 mag, preceded by a plateau of ~0.8 mag. Spectra and optical/IR photometry are consistent with the eclipsed star being a lightly reddened B9III star of inferred age ~150 Myr and mass of ~4 solar masses. The disk appears to have an outer radius of ~0.2 AU with predicted temperatures of ~1100-1400 K. We model the eclipses as being due to either a transiting geometrically thin dust disk or gaseous accretion disk around a secondary object; the debris disk produces a better fit. We speculate on the origin of such a dense circumstellar dust disk structure orbiting a relatively old low-mass companion, and on the similarities of this system to the previously discovered EE Cep.
  • We present an isochrone server for semi-empirical pre-main-sequence model isochrones in the following systems: Johnson-Cousins, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Two-Micron All-Sky Survey, Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) Wide-Field Camera, and INT Photometric H$\alpha$ Survey (IPHAS)/UV-Excess Survey (UVEX). The server can be accessed via the Cluster Collaboration webpage {http://www.astro.ex.ac.uk/people/timn/isochrones/}. To achieve this we have used the observed colours of member stars in young clusters with well-established age, distance and reddening to create fiducial loci in the colour-magnitude diagram. These empirical sequences have been used to quantify the discrepancy between the models and data arising from uncertainties in both the interior and atmospheric models, resulting in tables of semi-empirical bolometric corrections (BCs) in the various photometric systems. The model isochrones made available through the server are based on existing stellar interior models coupled with our newly derived semi-empirical BCs. As part of this analysis we also present new cluster parameters for both the Pleiades and Praesepe, yielding ages of $135^{+20}_{-11}$ and $665^{+14}_{-7}\,\rm{Myr}$ as well as distances of $132 \pm 2$ and $184 \pm 2\,\rm{pc}$ respectively (statistical uncertainty only).
  • Jeffries & Binks (2014) and Malo et al. (2014) have recently reported Li depletion boundary (LDB) ages for the {\beta} Pictoris moving group (BPMG) which are twice as old as the oft-cited kinematic age of $\sim$12 Myr. In this study we present (1) a new evaluation of the internal kinematics of the BPMG using the revised Hipparcos astrometry and best available published radial velocities, and assess whether a useful kinematic age can be derived, and (2) derive an isochronal age based on the placement of the A-, F- and G-type stars in the colour-magnitude diagram (CMD). We explore the kinematics of the BPMG looking at velocity trends along Galactic axes, and conducting traceback analyses assuming linear trajectories, epicyclic orbit approximation, and orbit integration using a realistic gravitational potential. None of the methodologies yield a kinematic age with small uncertainties using modern velocity data. Expansion in the Galactic X and Y directions is significant only at the 1.7{\sigma} and 2.7{\sigma} levels, and together yields an overall kinematic age with a wide range (13-58 Myr; 95 per cent CL). The A-type members are all on the zero age-main-sequence, suggestive of an age of $>$20Myr, and the loci of the CMD positions for the late-F- and G-type pre-main-sequence BPMG members have a median isochronal age of 22 Myr ($\pm$ 3 Myr stat., $\pm$ 1 Myr sys.) when considering four sets of modern theoretical isochrones. The results from recent LDB and isochronal age analyses are now in agreement with a median BPMG age of 23 $\pm$ 3 Myr (overall 1{\sigma} uncertainty, including $\pm$2 Myr statistical and $\pm$2 Myr systematic uncertainties).
  • We search for systems hosting eclipsing discs using a complete sample of eclipsing binaries (EBs); those previously identified in the third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III). Within a subsample of 2,823 high-cadence, high-photometric precision and large eclipsing depth detached EBs previously identified in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), we find that the skewness and kurtosis of the light curves magnitude distribution within the primary eclipse can distinguish EBs hosting a disc from those without. Two systems with previously identified eclipsing discs (OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893 and OGLE-LMC-ECL-17782) are identified with near zero skewness ($|S|<0.5$) and positive kurtosis. No additional eclipsing disc systems were found in the OGLE-III LMC, Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) or Galactic Disc (GD) EB light curves. We estimate that the fraction of detached near main-sequence LMC EBs (which have a primary with an $I$-band magnitude brighter than $\simeq 19\,\rm{mag}$) that host a disc is approximately 1/1000. As circumstellar disc lifetimes are short, we expected to primarily find eclipsing discs around young stars. In addition, as there is more room for a disc in a widely separated binary and because a disk close to a luminous star would be above the dust sublimation temperature, we expected to primarily find eclipsing discs in long period binaries. However, OGLE-LMC-ECL-17782 is a 13.3 day period B star system with a transient and hot ($\sim 6000\,\rm{K}$, $\sim 0.1\,\rm{AU}$ radius) disc and Scott et al. (in prep.) estimate an age of $150\,\rm{Myr}$ for OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893. Both discs are unexpected in the EB sample and impel explanation.
  • We searched the light curves of over 40000 stars in the 2MASS calibration database, spanning approximately 4 years, for objects that have significant day long dimming events. We also searched the multi-color light curves for red dimming events that could be due to transient extinction. In the color independent sigma-limited search, we found 46 previously unknown eclipsing binaries, 6 periodic variable stars likely to be intrinsic pulsators and 21 young stellar objects in the $\rho$ Ophiucus star formation region previously studied by Parks et al. 2013. An additional 11 objects exhibited dimming events and most of these are unclassified. The search for red dimming events primarily reveals a population of low luminosity active galaxies that become bluer when they are brighter, and variable young stellar objects exhibiting high cross-correlation coefficients between color and brightness. The young stellar objects exhibit brightness and color variations in the direction of interstellar extinction whereas the active galaxies can have a bowed distribution in color and magnitude with reduced variation in color when the object is brightest. Among the objects that are usually quiescent (not strongly variable), we failed to find any dimming events deeper than 0.2 magnitude and lasting longer than a day. Two of the least embedded young stellar objects, however, dimmed by 0.2 mag for longer than a day without strong color variation. Having failed to find new exotic objects, we explored ways to eliminate commonly found objects so that a larger number of objects may be searched. We find that all but one eclipsing binary are excluded by requiring moderate color variation during a dimming event and most of the active galaxies and young stellar objects are excluded by placing a limit on the standard deviation of the magnitude distribution in the light curve.
  • We have derived ages for 13 young (<30 Myr) star-forming regions and find they are up to a factor two older than the ages typically adopted in the literature. This result has wide-ranging implications, including that circumstellar discs survive longer (~10-12 Myr) and that the average Class I lifetime is greater (~1 Myr) than currently believed. For each star-forming region we derived two ages from colour-magnitude diagrams. First we fitted models of the evolution between the zero-age main-sequence and terminal-age main-sequence to derive a homogeneous set of main-sequence ages, distances and reddenings with statistically meaningful uncertainties. Our second age for each star-forming region was derived by fitting pre-main-sequence stars to new semi-empirical model isochrones. For the first time (for a set of clusters younger than 50 Myr) we find broad agreement between these two ages, and since these are derived from two distinct mass regimes that rely on different aspects of stellar physics, it gives us confidence in the new age scale. This agreement is largely due to our adoption of empirical colour-Teff relations and bolometric corrections for pre-main-sequence stars cooler than 4000 K. The revised ages for the star-forming regions in our sample are: ~2 Myr for NGC 6611 (Eagle Nebula; M 16), IC 5146 (Cocoon Nebula), NGC 6530 (Lagoon Nebula; M 8), and NGC 2244 (Rosette Nebula); ~6 Myr for {\sigma} Ori, Cep OB3b, and IC 348; ~10 Myr for {\lambda} Ori (Collinder 69); ~11 Myr for NGC 2169; ~12 Myr for NGC 2362; ~13 Myr for NGC 7160; ~14 Myr for {\chi} Per (NGC 884); and ~20 Myr for NGC 1960 (M 36).
  • We have used medium resolution spectra to search for evidence that proto-stellar objects accrete at high rates during their early 'assembly phase'. Models predict that depleted lithium and reduced luminosity in T-Tauri stars are key signatures of 'cold' high-rate accretion occurring early in a star's evolution. We found no evidence in 168 stars in NGC 2264 and the Orion Nebula Cluster for strong lithium depletion through analysis of veiling corrected 6708 angstrom lithium spectral line strengths. This suggests that 'cold' accretion at high rates (M_dot > 5 x 10-4 M_sol yr-1) occurs in the assembly phase of fewer than 0.5 per cent of 0.3 < M < 1.9 M_sol stars. We also find that the dispersion in the strength of the 6708 angstrom lithium line might imply an age spread that is similar in magnitude to the apparent age spread implied by the luminosity dispersion seen in colour magnitude diagrams. Evidence for weak lithium depletion (< 10 per cent in equivalent width) that is correlated with luminosity is also apparent, but we are unable to determine whether age spreads or accretion at rates less than 5 x 10-4 M_sol yr-1 are responsible.
  • We present a critical assessment of commonly used pre-main-sequence isochrones by comparing their predictions to a set of well-calibrated colour-magnitude diagrams of the Pleiades in the wavelength range 0.4 to 2.5 microns. Our analysis shows that for temperatures less than 4000 K the models systematically overestimate the flux by a factor two at 0.5 microns, though this decreases with wavelength, becoming negligible at 2.2 microns. In optical colours this will result in the ages for stars younger than 10 Myr being underestimated by factors between two and three. We show that using observations of standard stars to transform the data into a standard system can introduce significant errors in the positioning of pre-main-sequences in colour-magnitude diagrams. Therefore we have compared the models to the data in the natural photometric system in which the observations were taken. Thus we have constructed and tested a model of the system responses for the Wide-Field Camera on the Isaac Newton Telescope. As a benchmark test for the development of pre-main-sequence models we provide both our system responses and the Pleiades sequence.