• We derive an exact expression for the correlation function in redshift shells including all the relativistic contributions. This expression, which does not rely on the distant-observer or flat-sky approximation, is valid at all scales and includes both local relativistic corrections and integrated contributions, like gravitational lensing. We present two methods to calculate this correlation function, one which makes use of the angular power spectrum C_ell(z1,z2) and a second method which evades the costly calculations of the angular power spectra. The correlation function is then used to define the power spectrum as its Fourier transform. In this work theoretical aspects of this procedure are presented, together with quantitative examples. In particular, we show that gravitational lensing modifies the multipoles of the correlation function and of the power spectrum by a few percent at redshift z=1 and by up to 30% and more at z=2. We also point out that large-scale relativistic effects and wide-angle corrections generate contributions of the same order of magnitude and have consequently to be treated in conjunction. These corrections are particularly important at small redshift, z=0.1, where they can reach 10%. This means in particular that a flat-sky treatment of relativistic effects, using for example the power spectrum, is not consistent.
  • The equivalence principle, that is one of the main pillars of general relativity, is very well tested in the Solar system; however, its validity is more uncertain on cosmological scales, or when dark matter is concerned. This article shows that relativistic effects in the large-scale structure can be used to directly test whether dark matter satisfies Euler's equation, i.e. whether its free fall is characterised by geodesic motion, just like baryons and light. After having proposed a general parametrisation for deviations from Euler's equation, we perform Fisher-matrix forecasts for future surveys like DESI and the SKA, and show that such deviations can be constrained with a precision of order 10%. Deviations from Euler's equation cannot be tested directly with standard methods like redshift-space distortions and gravitational lensing, since these observables are not sensitive to the time component of the metric. Our analysis shows therefore that relativistic effects bring new and complementary constraints to alternative theories of gravity.
  • We investigate the feasibility of measuring the effects of peculiar velocities in large-scale structure using the dipole of the redshift-space cross-correlation function. We combine number counts of galaxies with brightness-temperature fluctuations from 21cm intensity mapping, demonstrating that the dipole may be measured at modest significance ($\lesssim 2\sigma$) by combining the upcoming radio survey CHIME with the future redshift surveys of DESI and Euclid. More significant measurements ($\lesssim~10\sigma$) will be possible by combining intensity maps from the SKA with these of DESI or Euclid, and an even higher significance measurement ($\lesssim 100\sigma$) may be made by combining observables completely internally to the SKA. We account for effects such as contamination by wide-angle terms, interferometer noise and beams in the intensity maps, non-linear enhancements to the power spectrum, stacking multiple populations, sensitivity to the magnification slope, and the possibility that number counts and intensity maps probe the same tracers. We also derive a new expression for the covariance matrix of multi-tracer redshift-space correlation function estimators with arbitrary orientation weights, which may be useful for upcoming surveys aiming at measuring redshift-space clustering with multiple tracers.
  • We compute a general expression for the contribution of vector perturbations to the redshift-space distortion of galaxy surveys. We show that they contribute to the same multipoles of the correlation function as scalar perturbations and should thus in principle be taken into account in data analysis. We derive constraints for next-generation surveys on the amplitude of two sources of vector perturbations, namely non-linear clustering and topological defects. While topological defects leave a very small imprint on redshift-space distortions, we show that the multipoles of the correlation function are sensitive to vorticity induced by non-linear clustering. Therefore future redshift surveys such as DESI or the SKA should be capable of measuring such vector modes, especially with the hexadecapole which appears to be the most sensitive to the presence of vorticity.
  • Objects falling into an overdensity appear larger on its near side and smaller on its far side than other objects at the same redshift. This produces a dipolar pattern of magnification, primarily as a consequence of the Doppler effect. At low redshift this Doppler magnification completely dominates the usual integrated gravitational lensing contribution to the lensing magnification. We show that one can optimally observe this pattern by extracting the dipole in the cross-correlation of number counts and galaxy sizes. This dipole allows us to almost completely remove the contribution from gravitational lensing up to redshift 0.5, and even at high redshift z~1 the dipole picks up the Doppler magnification predominantly. Doppler magnification should be easily detectable in current and upcoming optical and radio surveys; by forecasting for telescopes such as the SKA, we show that this technique is competitive with using peculiar velocities via redshift-space distortions to constrain dark energy. It produces similar yet complementary constraints on the cosmological model to those found using measurements of the cosmic shear.
  • Third generation ground-based interferometers as well as the planned space-based interferometer LISA are expected to detect a plethora of gravitational wave signals from coalescing binaries at cosmological distance. The emitted gravitational waves propagate in the expanding universe through the inhomogeneous distribution of matter. Here we show that the acceleration of the universe and the peculiar acceleration of the binary with respect to the observer distort the gravitational chirp signal from the simplest General Relativity prediction beyond a mere time independent rescaling of the chirp mass, affecting intrinsic parameter estimations for the binaries visible by LISA. We find that the effect due to the peculiar acceleration can be much larger than the one due to the universe acceleration. Moreover, peculiar accelerations can introduce a bias in the estimation of parameters such as the time of coalescence and the individual masses of the binary. An error in the estimation of the arrival time will have an impact in the case of sources visible first by LISA and later by ground based interferometers.
  • It is usually assumed that in the linear regime the two-point correlation function of galaxies contains only a monopole, quadrupole and hexadecapole. Looking at cross-correlations between different populations of galaxies, this turns out not to be the case. In particular, the cross-correlations between a bright and a faint population of galaxies contain also a dipole. In this paper we present the first attempt to measure this dipole. We discuss the four types of effects that contribute to the dipole: relativistic distortions, evolution effect, wide-angle effect and large-angle effect. We show that the first three contributions are intrinsic anti-symmetric contributions that do not depend on the choice of angle used to measure the dipole. On the other hand the large-angle effect appears only if the angle chosen to extract the dipole breaks the symmetry of the problem. We show that the relativistic distortions, the evolution effect and the wide-angle effect are too small to be detected in the LOWz and CMASS sample of the BOSS survey. On the other hand with a specific combination of angles we are able to measure the large-angle effect with high significance. We emphasise that this large-angle dipole does not contain new physical information, since it is just a geometrical combination of the monopole and the quadrupole. However this measurement, which is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions, validates our method for extracting the dipole from the two-point correlation function and it opens the way to the detection of relativistic effects in future surveys like e.g. DESI.
  • It has been shown recently that relativistic distortions generate a dipolar modulation in the two-point correlation function of galaxies. To measure this relativistic dipole it is necessary to cross-correlate different populations of galaxies with for example different luminosities or colours. In this paper, we construct an optimal estimator to measure the dipole with multiple populations. We show that this estimator increases the signal-to-noise of the dipole by up to 35 percent. Using 6 populations of galaxies, in a survey with halos and number densities similar to those of the millennium simulation, we forecast a cumulative signal-to-noise of 4.4. For the main galaxy sample of SDSS at low redshift z<0.2 our optimal estimator predicts a cumulative signal-to-noise of 2.4. Finally we forecast a cumulative signal-to-noise of 7.4 in the upcoming DESI survey. These forecasts indicate that with the appropriate choice of estimator the relativistic dipole should be detectable in current and future surveys.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We show that at second order, ensemble averages of observables and directional averages do not commute due to gravitational lensing -- observing the same thing in many directions over the sky is not the same as taking an ensemble average. In principle this non-commutativity is significant for a variety of quantities that we often use as observables and can lead to a bias in parameter estimation. We derive the relation between the ensemble average and the directional average of an observable, at second order in perturbation theory. We discuss the relevance of these two types of averages for making predictions of cosmological observables, focusing on observables related to distances and magnitudes. In particular, we show that the ensemble average of the distance in a given observed direction is increased by gravitational lensing, whereas the directional average of the distance is decreased. For a generic observable, there exists a particular function of the observable that is not affected by second-order lensing perturbations. We also show that standard areas have an advantage over standard rulers, and we discuss the subtleties involved in averaging in the case of supernova observations.
  • It has recently been shown that second-order corrections to the background distance-redshift relation can build up significantly at large redshifts, due to an aggregation of gravitational lensing events. This shifts the expectation value of the distance to the CMB by 1%. In this paper we show that this shift is already properly accounted for in standard CMB analyses. We clarify the role that the area distance to the CMB plays in the presence of second-order lensing corrections.
  • We derive an analytical expression for a novel large-scale structure observable: the line correlation function. The line correlation function, which is constructed from the three-point correlation function of the phase of the density field, is a robust statistical measure allowing the extraction of information in the non-linear and non-Gaussian regime. We show that, in perturbation theory, the line correlation is sensitive to the coupling kernel F_2, which governs the non-linear gravitational evolution of the density field. We compare our analytical expression with results from numerical simulations and find a 1-sigma agreement for separations r<30 Mpc/h. Fitting formulae for the power spectrum and the non-linear coupling kernel at small scales allow us to extend our prediction into the strongly non-linear regime where we find a 1-sigma agreement with the simulations for r<2 Mpc/h. We discuss the advantages of the line correlation relative to standard statistical measures like the bispectrum. Unlike the latter, the line correlation is independent of the bias, in the regime where the bias is local and linear. Furthermore, the variance of the line correlation is independent of the Gaussian variance on the modulus of the density field. This suggests that the line correlation can probe more precisely the non-linear regime of gravity, with less contamination from the power spectrum variance.
  • We present a fully relativistic calculation of the observed galaxy number counts in the linear regime. We show that besides the density fluctuations and redshift-space distortions, various relativistic effects contribute to observations at large scales. These effects all have the same physical origin: they result from the fact that our coordinate system, namely the galaxy redshift and the incoming photons' direction, is distorted by inhomogeneities in our universe. We then discuss the impact of the relativistic effects on the angular power spectrum and on the two-point correlation function in configuration space. We show that the latter is very well adapted to isolate the relativistic effects since it naturally makes use of the symmetries of the different contributions. In particular, we discuss how the Doppler effect and the gravitational redshift distortions can be isolated by looking for a dipole in the cross-correlation function between a bright and a faint population of galaxies.
  • We study the two-point cross-correlation function between two populations of galaxies: for instance a bright population and a faint population. We show that this cross-correlation is asymmetric under the exchange of the line-of-sight coordinate of the galaxies, i.e. that the correlation is different if the bright galaxy is in front of, or behind, the faint galaxy. We give an intuitive, quasi-Newtonian derivation of all the effects that contribute to such an asymmetry in large-scale structure: gravitational redshift, Doppler shift, lensing, light-cone, evolution and Alcock-Paczynski effects - interestingly, the gravitational redshift term is exactly canceled by some of the others, assuming geodesic motion. Most of these effects are captured by previous calculations of general relativistic corrections to the observed galaxy density fluctuation; the asymmetry arises from terms that are suppressed by the ratio H/k - H is the Hubble constant and k is the wavenumber - which are more readily observable than the terms suppressed by (H/k)^2. Some of the contributions to the asymmetry, however, arise from terms that are generally considered 'Newtonian' - the lensing and evolution - and thus represent a contaminant in the search for general relativistic corrections. We propose methods to disentangle these different contributions. A simple method reduces the contamination to a level of < 10% for redshifts z<1. We also clarify the relation to recent work on measuring gravitational redshifts by stacking clusters.
  • If the B-mode signal in the CMB polarization seen by the BICEP2 experiment is confirmed, it has dramatic implications for models of inflation. The result is also in tension with Planck limits on standard inflationary models. It is therefore important to investigate whether this signal can arise from alternative sources. If so, this could lessen the pressure on inflationary models and the tension with Planck data. We investigate whether vector and tensor modes from primordial magnetic fields can explain the signal. We find that in principle, magnetic fields generated during inflation can indeed produce the required B-mode, for a suitable range of energy scales of inflation. In this case, the primordial gravitational wave amplitude is negligible, so that there is no tension with Planck and no problems posed for current inflationary models. However, the simplest magnetic model is in tension with Planck limits on non-Gaussianity in the trispectrum. It may be possible to fine-tune the magnetogenesis model so that this non-Gaussianity is suppressed. Alternatively, a weaker magnetic field can pass the non-Gaussianity constraints and allow the primordial tensor mode to be reduced to r~0.09, thus removing the tension with Planck data and alleviating the problems with simple inflationary models.
  • We study the effect of peculiar motion in weak gravitational lensing. We derive a fully relativistic formula for the cosmic shear and the convergence in a perturbed Friedmann Universe. We find a new contribution related to galaxies peculiar velocity. This contribution does not affect cosmic shear in a measurable way, since it is of second order in the velocity. However, its effect on the convergence (and consequently on the magnification, which is a measurable quantity) is important, especially for redshifts z < 1. As a consequence, peculiar motion modifies also the relation between the shear and the convergence.
  • The cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies from primordial magnetic fields are studied. In addition to the known passive and the compensated mode we discuss an inflationary magnetic mode in the curvature perturbation, present when magnetic fields are generated during inflation. This mode is absent if the generation mechanism is causal, e.g. a phase transition. We compute and discuss the effect of this mode on the observed CMB anisotropy spectrum, in comparison with the passive and compensated ones. We find that it dominates the CMB anisotropy, and consequently leads to stronger constraints on the amplitude $B_{1\,{\rm Mpc}}$ and spectral index $n_B$ of the magnetic field than what usually found in CMB analyses from the compensated mode. This happens in particular for spectral indexes $n_B>-3$: the inflationary magnetic mode is always scale invariant, therefore through this mode even a magnetic field with a spectrum which is not scale invariant can leave a detectable signal in the CMB at large scales.
  • We investigate the prospects for constraining alternative theories of gravity with a typical near-term low-budget 21 cm intensity mapping experiment. We derive the 21 cm brightness temperature perturbation consistently in linear theory including all line-of-sight and relativistic effects. We uncover new terms that are a small correction on large scales, analogous to those recently found in the context of galaxy surveys. We then perform a Fisher matrix analysis of the B_0 parametrization of f(R) gravity, where B_0 is proportional to the square of Compton wavelength of the scalaron. We find that our 21 cm survey, in combination with CMB information from Planck, will be able to place a 95% upper limit of 7 x 10^{-5} on B_0 in flat models with a LCDM expansion history, improving on current cosmological constraints by several orders of magnitude. We argue that this constraint is limited by our ability to model the mildly non-linear regime of structure formation in modified gravity. We also perform a model-independent principal component analysis on the free functions introduced into the field equations by modified gravity, mu and Sigma. We find that 20--30 modes of the free functions will be `well-constrained' by our combination of observables, the lower and upper limits dependent on the criteria used to define the `goodness' of the constraint. These constraints are found to be robust to uncertainties in the time-dependence of the bias. Our analysis reveals that our observables are sensitive primarily to temporal variations in Sigma and scale variations in mu. We argue that the inclusion of 21 cm intensity maps will significantly improve constraints on any cosmological deviations from General Relativity in large-scale structure in a very cost-effective manner.
  • We discover that the mass of dark matter particles mDM is imprinted in phase-correlations of the cosmic density field more significantly than in the 2-point correlation. In particular, phase-correlations trace mDM out to scales about five times larger than the 2-point correlation. This result relies on a new estimator l(r) of pure phase-information in Fourier space, which can be interpreted as a parameter-free and scale-invariant tracer of filament-like structure. Based on simulated density fields we show how mDM can, in principle, be measured using l(r), given a suitably reconstructed density field.
  • We compute the contribution to the scalar metric perturbations from large-scale magnetic fields which are generated during inflation. We show that apart from the usual passive and compensated modes, the magnetic fields also contribute to the constant mode from inflation. This is different from the causal (post inflationary) generation of magnetic fields where such a mode is absent and it might lead to significant, non-Gaussian CMB anisotropies.
  • In this paper we compute the quantity which is truly measured in a large galaxy survey. We take into account the effects coming from the fact that we actually observe galaxy redshifts and sky positions and not true spatial positions. Our calculations are done within linear perturbation theory for both the metric and the observer velocities but they can be used for non-linear matter power spectra. We shall see that the complications due to the fact that we only observe on our background lightcone and that we do not truly know the distance of the observed galaxy, but only its redshift is not only an additional difficulty, but even more a new opportunity for future galaxy surveys.
  • This paper has been withdrawn by the authors due to a mistake in the calculations leading to an erroneous conclusion.
  • Future lensing surveys will be nearly full-sky and reach an unprecedented depth, probing scales closer and closer to the Hubble radius. This motivates the study of the cosmic shear beyond the small-angle approximation and including general relativistic corrections that are usually suppressed on sub-Hubble scales. The complete expression of the reduced cosmic shear at second order including all relativistic effects was derived in [1]. In the present paper we compute the resulting cosmic shear bispectrum when all these effects are properly taken into account and we compare it to primordial non-Gaussianity of the local type. The new general relativistic effects are generically smaller than the standard non-linear couplings. However, their relative importance increases at small multipoles and for small redshifts of the sources. The dominant effect among these non standard corrections is due to the inhomogeneity of the source redshift. In the squeezed limit, its amplitude can become of the order of the standard couplings when the redshift of the sources is below 0.5. Moreover, while the standard non-linear couplings depend on the angle between the short and long mode, the relativistic corrections do not and overlap almost totally with local type non-Gaussianity. We find that they can contaminate the search for a primordial local signal by f_NL>10.
  • We derive an expression for the luminosity distance in a perturbed Friedmann universe. We define the correlation function and the power spectrum of the luminosity distance fluctuations and express them in terms of the initial spectrum of the Bardeen potential. We present semi-analytical results for the case of a pure CDM universe. We argue that the luminosity distance power spectrum represents a new observational tool which can be used to determine cosmological parameters. In addition, our results shed some light into the debate whether second order small scale fluctuations can mimic an accelerating universe.