• We report the discovery of three new substellar companions to solar-type stars, HD191806, HD214823, and HD221585, based on radial velocity measurements obtained at the Haute-Provence Observatory. Data from the SOPHIE spectrograph are combined with observations acquired with its predecessor, ELODIE, to detect and characterise the orbital parameters of three new gaseous giant and brown dwarf candidates. Additionally, we combine SOPHIE data with velocities obtained at the Lick Observatory to improve the parameters of an already known giant planet companion, HD16175 b. Thanks to the use of different instruments, the data sets of all four targets span more than ten years. Zero-point offsets between instruments are dealt with using Bayesian priors to incorporate the information we possess on the SOPHIE/ELODIE offset based on previous studies. The reported companions have orbital periods between three and five years and minimum masses between 1.6 Mjup and 19 Mjup. Additionally, we find that the star HD191806 is experiencing a secular acceleration of over 11 \ms\ per year, potentially due to an additional stellar or substellar companion. A search for the astrometric signature of these companions was carried out using Hipparcos data. No orbit was detected, but a significant upper limit to the companion mass can be set for HD221585, whose companion must be substellar. With the exception of HD191806 b, the companions are located within the habitable zone of their host star. Therefore, satellites orbiting these objects could be a propitious place for life to develop.
  • In this paper we present the coordinates of 67 55' x 55' patches of sky which have the rare combination of both high stellar surface density (>0.5 arcmin^{-2} with 13<R<16.5 mag) and low extinction (E(B-V)<0.1). These fields are ideal for adaptive-optics based follow-up of extragalactic targets. One region of sky, situated near Baade's Window, contains most of the patches we have identified. Our optimal field, centered at RA: 7h24m3s, Dec: -1deg27'15", has an additional advantage of being accessible from both hemispheres. We propose a figure of merit for quantifying real-world adaptive optics performance, and use this to analyze the performance of multi-conjugate adaptive optics in these fields. We also compare our results to those that would be obtained in existing deep fields. In some cases adaptive optics observations undertaken in the fields given in this paper would be orders of magnitude more efficient than equivalent observations undertaken in existing deep fields.
  • Recent studies of the substellar population in the Taurus cloud have revealed a deficit of brown dwarfs (BD) compared to the Trapezium cluster population (Briceno et al 1998; Luhman 2000; Luhman et al 2003a; Luhman 2004). However, these works have concentrated on the highest stellar density regions of the Taurus cloud. We have performed a large scale optical survey of this region, covering a total area of 30 deg^2, and encompassing the densest part of the cloud as well as their surroundings, down to a mass detection limits of 15 Jupiter Masses (MJ). In this paper, we present the optical spectroscopic follow-up observations of 97 photometrically selected potential new low-mass Taurus members, of which 27 are strong late-M (SpT < M4V) candidates. These observations reveal 5 new very low mass (VLM) Taurus members and 12 new BDs. Combining our observations with previously published results, we derive an updated substellar to stellar ratio in Taurus of Rss =0.23 +/- 0.05. This ratio now appears consistent with the value previously derived in the Trapezium cluster under similar assumptions of 0.26 +/- 0.04. We find strong indication that the relative numbers of BDs with respect to stars is decreased by a factor 2 in the central regions of the aggregates with respect to the more distributed population. Our findings are best explained in the context of the embryo-ejection model where brown dwarfs originate from dynamical interactions in small N unstable multiple systems.
  • We present this paper in conjuction with the following as the first results in the CFHT Open Star Cluster Survey. This survey is a large BVR imaging data set of 19 open star clusters in our Galaxy. This data set was taken with the CFH12K mosaic CCD (42' X 28') and the majority of the clusters were imaged under excellent photometric, sub-arcsecond seeing conditions. The combination of multiple exposures extending to deep (V ~ 25) magnitudes with short (< 10 second) frames allows for many different studies. The primary aim of this survey is to catalogue the white dwarf stars in these clusters and establish observational constraints on the initial-final mass relationship for these stars and the upper mass limit to white dwarf production. Additionally, we hope to better determine the properties of the clusters, such as age and distance, and also test evolution and dynamical theories by analyzing luminosity and mass functions. In order to more easily incorporate this data in further studies, we have produced a catalogue of positions, magnitudes, colors, and stellarity confidence for all stars in each cluster of the survey. This paper is intended both as a source for the astronomical community to obtain information on the clusters in the survey and as a detailed reference of reduction procedures for further publications of individual clusters. We discuss the methods employed to reduce the data and compute the photometric catalogue. The scientific results for each individual cluster and global results from the study of the entire survey will be presented in further publications (results for the rich old open cluster NGC 6819 immediately follow this paper).
  • We present analysis of deep CCD photometry for the very rich, old open star cluster NGC 6819. These CFH12K data results represent the first of nineteen open star clusters which were imaged as a part of the CFHT Open Star Cluster Survey. We find a tight, very rich, main-sequence and turn-off consisting of over 2900 cluster stars in the V, B-V color-magnitude diagram (CMD). Main-sequence fitting of the un-evolved cluster stars with the Hyades star cluster yields a distance modulus of (m-M)v = 12.30 +/- 0.12, for a reddening of E(B-V) = 0.10. These values are consistent with a newly calculated theoretical stellar isochrone of age 2.5 Gyrs, which we take to be the age of the cluster. Detailed star counts indicate a much larger cluster extent (R = 9.5' +/- 1.0'), by a factor of ~2 over some previous estimates. Incompleteness tests confirm a slightly negatively sloped luminosity function extending to faint (V ~ 23) magnitudes which is indicative of a dynamically evolved cluster. Further luminosity function and mass segregation tests indicate that low mass objects (M < 0.65Mo) predominate in the outer regions of the cluster, 3.5 < R < 9.5. The estimation of the number of white dwarfs in NGC 6819 are in good agreement with the observed number. For those white dwarf candidates which pass both a statistical and image classification tests, we show comparisons to white dwarf isochrones and cooling models which suggest the need for spectroscopy to confirm the white dwarf nature of the brighter objects.