• We use mock interferometric HI measurements and a conventional tilted-ring modelling procedure to estimate circular velocity curves of dwarf galaxy discs from the APOSTLE suite of {\Lambda}CDM cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The modelling yields a large diversity of rotation curves for an individual galaxy at fixed inclination, depending on the line-of-sight orientation. The diversity is driven by non-circular motions in the gas; in particular, by strong bisymmetric fluctuations in the azimuthal velocities that the tilted-ring model is ill-suited to account for and that are difficult to detect in model residuals. Large misestimates of the circular velocity arise when the kinematic major axis coincides with the extrema of the fluctuation pattern, in some cases mimicking the presence of kiloparsec-scale density 'cores', when none are actually present. The thickness of APOSTLE discs compounds this effect: more slowly-rotating extra-planar gas systematically reduces the average line-of-sight speeds. The recovered rotation curves thus tend to underestimate the true circular velocity of APOSTLE galaxies in the inner regions. Non-circular motions provide an appealing explanation for the large apparent cores observed in galaxies such as DDO 47 and DDO 87, where the model residuals suggest that such motions might have affected estimates of the inner circular velocities. Although residuals from tilted ring models in the simulations appear larger than in observed galaxies, our results suggest that non-circular motions should be carefully taken into account when considering the evidence for dark matter cores in individual galaxies.
  • We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the APOSTLE project along with high-quality rotation curve observations to examine the fraction of baryons in {\Lambda}CDM haloes that collect into galaxies. This 'galaxy formation efficiency' correlates strongly and with little scatter with halo mass, dropping steadily towards dwarf galaxies. The baryonic mass of a galaxy may thus be used to place a lower limit on total halo mass and, consequently, on its asymptotic maximum circular velocity. A number of observed dwarfs seem to violate this constraint, having baryonic masses up to ten times higher than expected from their rotation speeds, or, alternatively, rotating at only half the speed expected for their mass. Taking the data at face value, either these systems have formed galaxies with extraordinary efficiency - highly unlikely given their shallow potential wells - or their dark matter content is much lower than expected from {\Lambda}CDM haloes. This 'missing dark matter' is reminiscent of the inner mass deficit of galaxies with slowly-rising rotation curves, but cannot be explained away by star formation-induced 'cores' in the dark mass profile, since the anomalous deficit applies to regions larger than the luminous galaxies themselves. We argue that explaining the structure of these galaxies would require either substantial modification of the standard Lambda cold dark matter paradigm or else significant revision to the uncertainties in their inferred mass profiles, which should be much larger than reported. Systematic errors in inclination may provide a simple resolution to what would otherwise be a rather intractable problem for the current paradigm.
  • The Hubble sequence provides a useful classification of galaxy morphology at low redshift. However, morphologies are not static, but rather evolve as the growth of structure proceeds through mergers, accretion and secular processes. We investigate how kinematically defined disc and spheroidal structures form and evolve in the EAGLE hydrodynamic simulation of galaxy formation. At high redshift most galaxies of all masses are asymmetric. By redshift $z\simeq 1.5$ the Hubble sequence is established and after this time most of the stellar mass is in spheroids whose contribution to the stellar mass budget continues to rise to the present day. The stellar mass fraction in discs peaks at $z\simeq 0.5$ but overall remains subdominant at all times although discs contribute most of the stellar mass in systems of mass $M^*\sim 10^{10.5}{\rm M_\odot}$ at $z \leq 1.5$. Star formation occurs predominantly in disc structures throughout most of cosmic time but morphological transformations rearrange stars, thus establishing the low-redshift morphological mix. Morphological transformations are common and we quantify the rates at which they occur. The rate of growth of spheroids decreases at $z < 2$ while the rate of decay of discs remains roughly constant at $z < 1$. Finally, we find that the prograde component of galaxies becomes increasingly dynamically cold with time.
  • Schwinn et al. (2017) have recently compared the abundance and distribution of massive substructures identified in a gravitational lensing analysis of Abell 2744 by Jauzac et al. (2016) and N-body simulation and found no cluster in {\Lambda}CDM simulation that is similar to Abell 2744. Schwinn et al.(2017) identified the measured projected aperture masses with the actual masses associated with subhaloes in the MXXL N-body simulation. We have used the high resolution Phoenix cluster simulations to show that such an identification is incorrect: the aperture mass is dominated by mass in the body of the cluster that happens to be projected along the line-of-sight to the subhalo. This enhancement varies from factors of a few to factors of more than 100, particularly for subhaloes projected near the centre of the cluster. We calculate aperture masses for subhaloes in our simulation and compare them to the measurements for Abell 2744. We find that the data for Abell 2744 are in excellent agreement with the matched predictions from {\Lambda}CDM. We provide further predictions for aperture mass functions of subhaloes in idealized surveys with varying mass detection thresholds.
  • We investigate the alignment of haloes with the filaments of the cosmic web using an unprecedently large sample of dark matter haloes taken from the P-Millennium $\Lambda$CDM cosmological N-body simulation. We use the state-of-the-art NEXUS multiscale morphological formalism which identifies simultaneously structures at all scales. We find strong and highly significant alignments, with both the major axis of haloes and their peculiar velocity tending to orient along the filament. However, the spin - filament alignment displays a puzzling trend changing from preferentially parallel at low masses to preferentially perpendicular at high masses, in stark contrast with the predictions of tidal torque theory. This "spin flip" occurs at a mass of $5\times10^{11}~h^{-1}M_\odot$. This mass increases with increasing filament diameter, varying by more than an order of magnitude between the thinnest and thickest filament samples. We also find that the inner parts of haloes have a spin flip mass that is several times smaller than that of the halo as a whole. These results suggest that recent accretion is responsible for the complex behaviour of the halo spin - filament alignment. Low-mass haloes mainly accrete mass along directions perpendicular to their host filament and thus their spins tend to be oriented along the filaments. In contrast, high-mass haloes mainly accrete along their host filaments and have their spins preferentially perpendicular to them. Furthermore, haloes located in thinner filaments are more likely to accrete along their host filaments than same mass haloes embedded in thicker filaments.
  • We examine the stellar haloes of the Auriga simulations, a suite of thirty cosmological magneto-hydrodynamical high-resolution simulations of Milky Way-mass galaxies performed with the moving-mesh code AREPO. We study halo global properties and radial profiles out to $\sim 150$ kpc for each individual galaxy. The Auriga haloes are diverse in their masses and density profiles; mean metallicity and metallicity gradients; ages; and shapes, reflecting the stochasticity inherent in their accretion and merger histories. A comparison with observations of nearby late-type galaxies shows very good agreement between most observed and simulated halo properties. However, Auriga haloes are typically too massive. We find a connection between population gradients and mass assembly history: galaxies with few significant progenitors have more massive haloes, possess large negative halo metallicity gradients and steeper density profiles. The number of accreted galaxies, either disrupted or under disruption, that contribute 90% of the accreted halo mass ranges from 2 to 15, with a median of 6.5, and their stellar masses span over three orders of magnitude. The observed halo mass--metallicity relation is well reproduced by Auriga and is set by the stellar mass and metallicity of the dominant satellite contributors. This relationship is found not only for the accreted component but also for the total (accreted + in-situ) stellar halo. Our results highlight the potential of observable halo properties to infer the assembly history of galaxies.
  • We investigate the population of dwarf galaxies with stellar masses similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) in the EAGLE galaxy formation simulation. In the field, galaxies reside in haloes with stellar-to-halo mass ratios of $1.03^{+0.50}_{-0.31}\times10^{-2}$ (68% confidence level); systems like the LMC, which have an SMC-mass satellite, reside in haloes about 1.3 times more massive, which suggests an LMC halo mass at infall, $M_{200}=3.4^{+1.8}_{-1.2}\times10^{11}M_\odot$ (68% confidence level). The colour distribution of dwarfs is bimodal, with the red galaxies ($g-r>0.6$) being mostly satellites. The fraction of red LMC-mass dwarfs is 15% for centrals, and for satellites this fraction increases rapidly with host mass: from 10% for satellites of Milky Way (MW)-mass haloes to nearly 90% for satellites of groups and clusters. The quenching timescale, defined as the time after infall when half of the satellites have acquired red colours, decreases with host mass from ${>}5$ Gyrs for MW-mass hosts to $2.5$ Gyrs for cluster mass hosts. The satellites of MW-mass haloes have higher star formation rates and bluer colours than field galaxies. This is due to enhanced star formation triggered by gas compression shortly after accretion. Both the LMC and M33 have enhanced recent star formation that could be a manifestation of this process. After infall into their MW-mass hosts, the $g-r$ colours of LMC-mass dwarfs become bluer for the first 2 Gyrs, after which they rapidly redden. LMC-mass dwarfs fell into their MW-mass hosts only relatively recently, with more than half having an infall time of less than 3.5 Gyrs.
  • We present predictions for the quenching of star formation in satellite galaxies of the Local Group from a suite of 30 cosmological zoom simulations of Milky Way-like host galaxies. The Auriga simulations resolve satellites down to the luminosity of the classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Milky Way. We find strong mass-dependent and distance-dependent quenching signals, where dwarf systems beyond 600 kpc are only strongly quenched below a stellar mass of $10^7$ M$_\odot$. Ram pressure stripping appears to be the dominant quenching mechanism and 50% of quenched systems cease star formation within 1 Gyr of first infall. We demonstrate that systems within a host galaxy's $R_{200}$ radius are comprised of two populations: (i) a first infall population that has entered the host halo within the past few Gyrs and (ii) a population of returning `backsplash' systems that have had a much more extended interaction with the host. Backsplash galaxies that do not return to the host galaxy by redshift zero exhibit quenching properties similar to galaxies within $R_{200}$ and are distinct from other external systems. The simulated quenching trend with stellar mass has some tension with observations, but our simulations are able reproduce the range of quenching times measured from resolved stellar populations of Local Group dwarf galaxies.
  • The shallow faint-end slope of the galaxy mass function is usually reproduced in $\Lambda$CDM galaxy formation models by assuming that the fraction of baryons that turns into stars drops steeply with decreasing halo mass and essentially vanishes in haloes with maximum circular velocities $V_{\rm max}<20$-$30$ km/s. Dark matter-dominated dwarfs should therefore have characteristic velocities of about that value, unless they are small enough to probe only the rising part of the halo circular velocity curve (i.e., half-mass radii, $r_{1/2}\ll 1$ kpc). Many dwarfs have properties in disagreement with this prediction: they are large enough to probe their halo $V_{\rm max}$ but their characteristic velocities are well below $20$ km/s. These `cold faint giants' (an extreme example is the recently discovered Crater 2 Milky Way satellite) can only be reconciled with our $\Lambda$CDM models if they are the remnants of once massive objects heavily affected by tidal stripping. We examine this possibility using the APOSTLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the Local Group. Assuming that low velocity dispersion satellites have been affected by stripping, we infer their progenitor masses, radii, and velocity dispersions, and find them in remarkable agreement with those of isolated dwarfs. Tidal stripping also explains the large scatter in the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation in the dwarf galaxy regime: tides remove preferentially dark matter from satellite galaxies, lowering their accelerations below the $a_{\rm min}\sim 10^{-11} m/s^2$ minimum expected for isolated dwarfs. In many cases, the resulting velocity dispersions are inconsistent with the predictions from Modified Newtonian Dynamics, a result that poses a possibly insurmountable challenge to that scenario.
  • The (re)ionisation of hydrogen in the early universe has a profound effect on the formation of the first galaxies: by raising the gas temperature and pressure, it prevents gas from cooling into small haloes thus affecting the abundance of present-day small galaxies. Using the Galform semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, we show that two key aspects of the reionisation process -- when reionisation takes place and the characteristic scale below which it suppresses galaxy formation -- are imprinted in the luminosity function of dwarf galaxies. We focus on the luminosity function of satellites of galaxies like the Milky Way and the LMC, which is easier to measure than the luminosity function of the dwarf population as a whole. Our results show that the details of these two characteristic properties of reionisation determine the shape of the luminosity distribution of satellites in a unique way, and is largely independent of the other details of the galaxy formation model. Our models generically predict a bimodality in the distribution of satellites as a function of luminosity: a population of faint satellites and population of bright satellites separated by a 'valley' forged by reionisation. We show that this bimodal distribution is present at high statistical significance in the combined satellite luminosity function of the Milky Way and M31. We make predictions for the expected number of satellites around LMC-mass dwarfs where the bimodality may also be measurable in future observational programmes. Our preferred model predicts a total of $26 \pm 10$ (68 per cent confidence) satellites brighter than ${\rm M}_V=0$ in LMC-mass systems.
  • We study the incidence of group and filamentary dwarf galaxy accretion into Milky Way (MW) mass haloes using two types of hydrodynamical simulations: EAGLE, which resolves a large cosmological volume, and the AURIGA suite, which are very high resolution zoom-in simulations of individual MW-sized haloes. The present-day 11 most massive satellites are predominantly (75%) accreted in single events, 14% in pairs and 6% in triplets, with higher group multiplicities being unlikely. Group accretion becomes more common for fainter satellites, with 60% of the top 50 satellites accreted singly, 12% in pairs, and 28% in richer groups. A group similar in stellar mass to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) would bring on average 15 members with stellar mass larger than $10^4{~\rm M_\odot}$. Half of the top 11 satellites are accreted along the two richest filaments. The accretion of dwarf galaxies is highly anisotropic, taking place preferentially perpendicular to the halo minor axis, and, within this plane, preferentially along the halo major axis. The satellite entry points tend to be aligned with the present-day central galaxy disc and satellite plane, but to a lesser extent than with the halo shape. Dwarfs accreted in groups or along the richest filament have entry points that show an even larger degree of alignment with the host halo than the full satellite population. We also find that having most satellites accreted as a single group or along a single filament is unlikely to explain the MW disc of satellites.
  • We compare the transverse velocity dispersions recently measured within the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy to the predictions of previously published dynamical models. These provide good fits to the observed number count and velocity dispersion profiles of metal-rich and metal-poor stars both in cored and in cusped potentials. At the projected radius where the proper motions were measured, these models predict transverse dispersions in the range 6 to 9.5 km/s, with the tangential dispersion about 1 km/s larger than the (projected) radial dispersion. Both dispersions are predicted to be about 1 km/s larger for metal-poor than for metal-rich stars. At this projected radius, cored and cusped potentials predict almost identical transverse dispersions. The measured tangential dispersion ($8.5 \pm 3.2$ km/s) agrees remarkably well with these predictions, while the measured radial dispersion ($11.5 \pm 4.3$ km/s) differs only at about the $1\sigma$ level. Thus, the proper motion data are in excellent agreement with previous data but do not help to distinguish between cored and cusped potentials. This will require velocity dispersion data (either from proper motions or from radial velocities) with uncertainties well below 1 km/s over a range of projected radii.
  • We examine the origin of radial and vertical gradients in the age/metallicity of the stellar component of a galaxy disc formed in the APOSTLE cosmological hydrody- namical simulations. Some of these gradients resemble those in the Milky Way, where they have sometimes been interpreted as due to internal evolution, such as scattering off giant molecular clouds, radial migration driven by spiral patterns, or orbital reso- nances with a bar. Secular processes play a minor role in the simulated galaxy, which lacks strong spiral or bar patterns, and where such gradients arise as a result of the gradual enrichment of a gaseous disc that is born thick but thins as it turns into stars and settles into centrifugal equilibrium. The settling is controlled by the feedback of young stars; which links the star formation, enrichment, and equilibration timescales, inducing radial and vertical gradients in the gaseous disc and its descendent stars. The kinematics of coeval stars evolve little after birth and provide a faithful snapshot of the gaseous disc structure at the time of their formation. In this interpretation, the age-velocity dispersion relation would reflect the gradual thinning of the disc rather than the importance of secular orbit scattering; the outward flaring of stars would result from the gas disc flare rather than from radial migration; and vertical gradients would arise because the gas disc gradually thinned as it enriched. Such radial and vertical trends might just reflect the evolving properties of the parent gaseous disc, and are not necessarily the result of secular evolutionary processes.
  • In a previous paper based on dark matter only simulations we show that, in the approximation of an analytic and static potential describing the strongly triaxial and cuspy shape of Milky Way-sized haloes, diffusion due to chaotic mixing in the neighbourhood of the Sun does not efficiently erase phase space signatures of past accretion events. In this second paper we further explore the effect of chaotic mixing using multicomponent Galactic potential models and solar neighbourhood-like volumes extracted from fully cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, thus naturally accounting for the gravitational potential associated with baryonic components, such as the bulge and disc. Despite the strong change in the global Galactic potentials with respect to those obtained in dark matter only simulations, our results confirm that a large fraction of halo particles evolving on chaotic orbits exhibit their chaotic behaviour after periods of time significantly larger than a Hubble time. In addition, significant diffusion in phase space is not observed on those particles that do exhibit chaotic behaviour within a Hubble time.
  • We investigate the nature of carbon-enhanced metal poor (CEMP) stars in Milky Way (MW) analogues selected from the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. The stellar evolution model in EAGLE includes the physics of enrichment by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, winds from massive stars, and type I and type II supernovae (SNe). In the simulation, star formation in young MW progenitors is bursty due to efficient stellar feedback, which causes poor metal mixing leading to the formation of CEMP stars with extreme abundance patterns. In this scenario, two classes of CEMP stars emerge: those mostly enriched by low-metallicity type II SNe with low Fe yields that drive galactic outflows, and those mostly enriched by AGB stars when a gas-poor progenitor accretes pristine gas. The first class resembles CEMP-no stars with high [C/Fe] and low [C/O], the second class resembles CEMP-s stars overabundant in s-process elements and high values of [C/O]. This scenario explains several trends seen in data: (i) the increase in the scatter and median of [C/O] at low and decreasing [O/H], (ii) the trend of stars with very low [Fe/H] or [C/H] to be of type CEMP-no, and (iii) the reduction in the scatter of [{\alpha}/Fe] with atomic number in metal poor stars. In this interpretation CEMP-no stars were enriched by the stars that enabled galaxies to reionise the Universe.
  • It is now possible for hydrodynamical simulations to reproduce a representative galaxy population. Accordingly, it is timely to assess critically some of the assumptions of traditional semi-analytic galaxy formation models. We use the Eagle simulations to assess assumptions built into the Galform semi-analytic model, focussing on those relating to baryon cycling, angular momentum and feedback. We show that the assumption in Galform that newly formed stars have the same specific angular momentum as the total disc leads to a significant overestimate of the total stellar specific angular momentum of disc galaxies. In Eagle, stars form preferentially out of low specific angular momentum gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) due to the assumed gas density threshold for stars to form, leading to more realistic galaxy sizes. We find that stellar mass assembly is similar between Galform and Eagle but that the evolution of gas properties is different, with various indications that the rate of baryon cycling in Eagle is slower than is assumed in Galform. Finally, by matching individual galaxies between Eagle and Galform, we find that an artificial dependence of AGN feedback and gas infall rates on halo mass doubling events in Galform drives most of the scatter in stellar mass between individual objects. Put together our results suggest that the Galform semi-analytic model can be significantly improved in light of recent advances.
  • We study the vertical structure of polytropic, $P\propto \rho^\Gamma$, centrifugally-supported gaseous discs embedded in cold dark matter (CDM) halos. At fixed radius $R$, the shape of the vertical density profile depends only weakly on whether the disc is self-gravitating (SG) or not (NSG). The disc thickness, set by the midplane sound speed and circular velocity, $(c_s/V_c)R$, in the NSG case, and by the sound speed and surface density, $c_s^2/G\Sigma$, in SG discs, is smaller than either of these scales. SG discs are typically Toomre unstable, NSG discs are stable. Exponential discs in CDM halos with roughly flat circular velocity curves generally "flare" outwards. For the polytropic equation of state of the EAGLE simulations, discs whose mass and size match observational constraints are stable (NSG) for $M_d< 3\times 10^9\, M_\odot$ and unstable (SG) at higher masses, if fully gaseous. We test these analytic results using a set of idealized SPH simulations and find excellent agreement. Our results clarify the role of the gravitational softening on the thickness of simulated discs, and on the onset of radial instabilities. EAGLE low-mass discs are non-self-gravitating so the softening plays no role in their vertical structure. High-mass discs, on the other hand, are expected to be self-gravitating and unstable, and may be artificially thickened and stabilized unless gravity is well resolved. Simulations with spatial resolution high enough to not compromise the vertical structure of a disc also resolve the onset of their instabilities, but the converse is not true: resolving instabilities does not guarantee that the vertical structure is resolved.
  • The existence of two kinematically and chemically distinct stellar subpopulations in the Sculptor and Fornax dwarf galaxies offers the opportunity to constrain the density profile of their matter haloes by measuring the mass contained within the well-separated half-light radii of the two metallicity subpopulations. Walker and Pe\~{n}arrubia have used this approach to argue that data for these galaxies are consistent with constant-density `cores' in their inner regions and rule out `cuspy' Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profiles with high statistical significance, particularly in the case of Sculptor. We test the validity of these claims using dwarf galaxies in the APOSTLE $\Lambda$CDM cosmological hydrodynamics simulations of analogues of the Local Group. These galaxies all have NFW dark matter density profiles and a subset of them develop two distinct metallicity subpopulations reminiscent of Sculptor and Fornax. We apply a method analogous to that of Walker and Penarrubia to a sample of 53 simulated dwarfs and find that this procedure often leads to a statistically significant detection of a core in the profile when in reality there is a cusp. Although multiple factors contribute to these failures, the main cause is a violation of the assumption of spherical symmetry upon which the mass estimators are based. The stellar populations of the simulated dwarfs tend to be significantly elongated and, in several cases, the two metallicity populations have different asphericity and are misaligned. As a result, a wide range of slopes of the density profile are inferred depending on the angle from which the galaxy is viewed.
  • Small distortions in the images of Einstein rings or giant arcs offer the exciting prospect of detecting dark matter haloes or subhaloes of mass below $10^9$M$_{\odot}$, most of which are too small to have made a visible galaxy. A very large number of such haloes are predicted to exist in the cold dark matter model of cosmogony; in contrast other models, such as warm dark matter, predict no haloes below a mass of this order which depends on the properties of the warm dark matter particle. Attempting to detect these small perturbers could therefore discriminate between different kinds of dark matter particles, and even rule out the cold dark matter model altogether. Globular clusters in the lens galaxy also induce distortions in the image which could, in principle, contaminate the test. Here, we investigate the population of globular clusters in six early type galaxies in the Virgo cluster. We find that the number density of globular clusters of mass $\sim10^6$M$_{\odot}$ is comparable to that of the dark matter perturbers (including subhaloes in the lens and haloes along the line-of-sight). We show that the very different degrees of mass concentration in globular clusters and dark matter haloes result in different lensing distortions. These are detectable with milli-arcsecond resolution imaging which can distinguish between globular cluster and dark matter halo signals.
  • We examine the origin of the mass discrepancy--radial acceleration relation (MDAR) of disk galaxies. This is a tight empirical correlation between the disk centripetal acceleration and that expected from the baryonic component. The MDAR holds for most radii probed by disk kinematic tracers, regardless of galaxy mass or surface brightness. The relation has two characteristic accelerations; $a_0$, above which all galaxies are baryon-dominated; and $a_{\rm min}$, an effective minimum aceleration probed by kinematic tracers in isolated galaxies. We use a simple model to show that these trends arise naturally in $\Lambda$CDM. This is because: (i) disk galaxies in $\Lambda$CDM form at the centre of dark matter haloes spanning a relatively narrow range of virial mass; (ii) cold dark matter halo acceleration profiles are self-similar and have a broad maximum at the centre, reaching values bracketed precisely by $a_{\rm min}$ and $a_0$ in that mass range; and (iii) halo mass and galaxy size scale relatively tightly with the baryonic mass of a galaxy in any successful $\Lambda$CDM galaxy formation model. Explaining the MDAR in $\Lambda$CDM does not require modifications to the cuspy inner mass profiles of dark haloes, although these may help to understand the detailed rotation curves of some dwarf galaxies and the origin of extreme outliers from the main relation. The MDAR is just a reflection of the self-similar nature of cold dark matter haloes and of the physical scales introduced by the galaxy formation process.
  • The standard galaxy formation theory assumes that baryons and dark matter are initially well-mixed before becoming segregated due to radiative cooling. We use non-radiative hydrodynamical simulations to explicitly examine this assumption and find that baryons and dark matter can also be segregated because of different physics obeyed by gas and dark matter during the build-up of the halo. As a result, baryons in many haloes do not originate from the same Lagrangian region as the dark matter. When using the fraction of corresponding dark matter and gas particles in the initial conditions (the "paired fraction") as a proxy of the dark matter and gas segregation strength of a halo, on average about $25$ percent of the baryonic and dark matter of the final halo are segregated in the initial conditions. This is at odds with the assumption of the standard galaxy formation model. A consequence of this effect is that the baryons and dark matter of the same halo initially experience different tidal torques and thus their angular momentum vectors are often misaligned. The degree of the misalignment is largely preserved during later halo assembly and can be understood with the tidal torque theory. The result challenges the precision of some semi-analytical approaches which utilize dark matter halo merger trees to infer properties of gas associated to dark matter haloes.
  • We present mock optical images, broad-band and H$\alpha$ fluxes, and D4000 spectral indices for 30,145 galaxies from the EAGLE hydrodynamical simulation at redshift $z=0.1$, modelling dust with the SKIRT Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The modelling includes a subgrid prescription for dusty star-forming regions, with both the subgrid obscuration of these regions and the fraction of metals in diffuse interstellar dust calibrated against far-infrared fluxes of local galaxies. The predicted optical colours as a function of stellar mass agree well with observation, with the SKIRT model showing marked improvement over a simple dust screen model. The orientation dependence of attenuation is weaker than observed because EAGLE galaxies are generally puffier than real galaxies, due to the pressure floor imposed on the interstellar medium. The mock H$\alpha$ luminosity function agrees reasonably well with the data, and we quantify the extent to which dust obscuration affects observed H$\alpha$ fluxes. The distribution of D4000 break values is bimodal, as observed. In the simulation, 20$\%$ of galaxies deemed `passive' for the SKIRT model, i.e. exhibiting D4000 $> 1.8$, are classified `active' when ISM dust attenuation is not included. The fraction of galaxies with stellar mass greater than $10^{10}$ M$_\odot$ that are deemed passive is slightly smaller than observed, which is due to low levels of residual star formation in these simulated galaxies. Colour images, fluxes and spectra of EAGLE galaxies are to be made available through the public EAGLE database.
  • The magnetic fields observed in the Milky~Way and nearby galaxies appear to be in equipartition with the turbulent, thermal, and cosmic ray energy densities, and hence are expected to be dynamically important. However, the origin of these strong magnetic fields is still unclear, and most previous attempts to simulate galaxy formation from cosmological initial conditions have ignored them altogether. Here, we analyse the magnetic fields predicted by the simulations of the Auriga Project, a set of 30 high-resolution cosmological zoom simulations of Milky~Way-like galaxies, carried out with a moving-mesh magneto-hydrodynamics code and a detailed galaxy formation physics model. We find that the magnetic fields grow exponentially at early times owing to a small-scale dynamo with an e-folding time of roughly $100\,\rm{Myr}$ in the center of halos until saturation occurs around $z=2-3$, when the magnetic energy density reaches about $10\%$ of the turbulent energy density with a typical strength of $10-50\,\rm{\mu G}$. In the galactic centers the ratio between magnetic and turbulent energy remains nearly constant until $z=0$. At larger radii, differential rotation in the disks leads to linear amplification that typically saturates around $z=0.5$ to $z=0$. The final radial and vertical variations of the magnetic field strength can be well described by two joint exponential profiles, and are in good agreement with observational constraints. Overall, the magnetic fields have only little effect on the global evolution of the galaxies as it takes too long to reach equipartition. We also demonstrate that our results are well converged with numerical resolution.
  • We characterize the contribution from accreted material to the galactic discs of the Auriga Project, a set of high resolution magnetohydrodynamic cosmological simulations of late-type galaxies performed with the moving-mesh code AREPO. Our goal is to explore whether a significant accreted (or ex-situ) stellar component in the Milky Way disc could be hidden within the near-circular orbit population, which is strongly dominated by stars born in-situ. One third of our models shows a significant ex-situ disc but this fraction would be larger if constraints on orbital circularity were relaxed. Most of the ex-situ material ($\gtrsim 50\%$) comes from single massive satellites ($> 6 \times 10^{10}~M_{\odot}$). These satellites are accreted with a wide range of infall times and inclination angles (up to $85^{\circ}$). Ex-situ discs are thicker, older and more metal-poor than their in-situ counterparts. They show a flat median age profile, which differs from the negative gradient observed in the in-situ component. As a result, the likelihood of identifying an ex-situ disc in samples of old stars on near-circular orbits increases towards the outskirts of the disc. We show three examples that, in addition to ex-situ discs, have a strongly rotating dark matter component. Interestingly, two of these ex-situ stellar discs show an orbital circularity distribution that is consistent with that of the in-situ disc. Thus, they would not be detected in typical kinematic studies.
  • We analyze the total and baryonic acceleration profiles of a set of well-resolved galaxies identified in the EAGLE suite of hydrodynamic simulations. Our runs start from the same initial conditions but adopt different prescriptions for unresolved stellar and AGN feedback, resulting in diverse populations of galaxies by the present day. Some of them reproduce observed galaxy scaling relations, while others do not. However, regardless of the feedback implementation, all of our galaxies follow closely a simple relationship between the total and baryonic acceleration profiles, consistent with recent observations of rotationally supported galaxies. The relation has small scatter: different feedback implementations -- which produce different galaxy populations -- mainly shift galaxies along the relation, rather than perpendicular to it. Furthermore, galaxies exhibit a characteristic acceleration, $g_{\dagger}$, above which baryons dominate the mass budget, as observed. These observations, consistent with simple modified Newtonian dynamics, can be accommodated within the standard cold dark matter paradigm.