• The Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics RelaY (MAORY) is and Adaptive Optics module to be mounted on the ESO European-Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). It is a hybrid Natural and Laser Guide System that will perform the correction of the atmospheric turbulence volume above the telescope feeding the Multi-AO Imaging Camera for Deep Observations Near Infrared spectro-imager (MICADO). We developed an end-to-end Monte- Carlo adaptive optics simulation tool to investigate the performance of a the MAORY and the calibration, acquisition, operation strategies. MAORY will implement Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics combining Laser Guide Stars (LGS) and Natural Guide Stars (NGS) measurements. The simulation tool implements the various aspect of the MAORY in an end to end fashion. The code has been developed using IDL and uses libraries in C++ and CUDA for efficiency improvements. Here we recall the code architecture, we describe the modeled instrument components and the control strategies implemented in the code.
  • In this paper we report on the laboratory experiment we settled in the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) to investigate the pyramid wavefront sensor (WFS) ability to measure the differential piston on a sparse aperture. The ultimate goal is to verify the ability of the pyramid WFS work in closed loop to perform the phasing of the primary mirrors of a sparse Fizeau imaging telescope. In the experiment we installed on the optical bench we performed various test checking the ability to flat the wave-front using a deformable mirror and to measure the signal of the differential piston on a two pupils setup. These steps represent the background from which we start to perform full closed loop operation on multiple apertures. These steps were also useful to characterize the achromatic double pyramids (double prisms) manufactured in the SHAO optical workshop.
  • Dark wavefront sensing in its simplest and more crude form is a quad-cell with a round spot of dark ink acting as occulting disk at the center. This sensor exhibits fainter limiting magnitude than a conventional quad-cell, providing that the size of the occulting disk is slightly smaller than the size of the spot and smaller than the residual jitter movement in closed loop. We present simulations focusing a generic Adaptive Optics system using Natural Guide Stars to provide the tip-tilt signal. We consider a jitter spectrum of the residual correction including amplitudes exceeding the dark disk size.
  • Dark wavefront sensing takes shape following quantum mechanics concepts in which one is able to "see" an object in one path of a two-arm interferometer using an as low as desired amount of light actually "hitting" the occulting object. A theoretical way to achieve such a goal, but in the realm of wavefront sensing, is represented by a combination of two unequal beams interferometer sharing the same incoming light, and whose difference in path length is continuously adjusted in order to show different signals for different signs of the incoming perturbation. Furthermore, in order to obtain this in white light, the path difference should be properly adjusted vs the wavelength used. While we incidentally describe how this could be achieved in a true optomechanical setup, we focus our attention to the simulation of a hypothetical "perfect" dark wavefront sensor of this kind in which white light compensation is accomplished in a perfect manner and the gain is selectable in a numerical fashion. Although this would represent a sort of idealized dark wavefront sensor that would probably be hard to match in the real glass and metal, it would also give a firm indication of the maximum achievable gain or, in other words, of the prize for achieving such device. Details of how the simulation code works and first numerical results are outlined along with the perspective for an in-depth analysis of the performances and its extension to more realistic situations, including various sources of additional noise.
  • We have obtained with the LBT Telescope AO system Near-Infrared camera PISCES images of the inner-shell of the nebula around the luminous blue variable star P Cygni in the [Fe II] emission line at 1.6435 {\mu}m. We have combined the images in order to cover a field of view of about 20" around P Cygni thus providing the high resolution (0".08) 2-D spatial distribution of the inner-shell of the P Cygni nebula in [Fe II]. We have identified several nebular emission regions which are characterized by an S/N>3. A comparison of our results with those available in the literature shows full consistency with the finding by Smith & Hartigan (2006) which are based on radial velocity measurements and their relatively good agreement with the extension of emission nebula in [NII] {\lambda}6584 found by Barlow et al. (1994). We have clearly detected extended emission also inside the radial distance R=7".8 and outside R=9".7 which are the nebular boundaries proposed by Smith & Hartigan (2006). New complementary spectroscopic observations to measure radial velocities and to derive the 3-D distribution of P Cygni nebula are planned.
  • MAORY is the adaptive optics module of the E-ELT that will feed the MICADO imaging camera through a gravity invariant exit port. MAORY has been foreseen to implement MCAO correction through three high order deformable mirrors driven by the reference signals of six Laser Guide Stars (LGSs) feeding as many Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensors. A three Natural Guide Stars (NGSs) system will provide the low order correction. We develop a code for the end-to-end simulation of the MAORY adaptive optics (AO) system in order to obtain high-delity modeling of the system performance. It is based on the IDL language and makes extensively uses of the GPUs. Here we present the architecture of the simulation tool and its achieved and expected performance.
  • The full LINC-NIRVANA instrument will be one of the most complex ground-based astronomical systems ever built. It will consist of multiple subsystems, including two multi-conjugate ground layer AO systems (MCAO) that drive the LBT adaptive secondaries, two mid-high layer AO systems with their own Xynetics 349 actuator DM's , a fringe tracker, a beam combiner, and the NIR science camera. In order to mitigate risk, we take a modular approach to instrument testing and commissioning by decoupling these subsystems individually. The first subsystem tested on-sky will be one of the ground-layer AO systems, part of a test-bed known as the Pathfinder. The Pathfinder consists of a 12-star pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS) that drives one of the LBT's adaptive secondaries, a support structure known as "The Foot," and the infrared test camera (IRTC), which is used for acquisition and alignment. The 12 natural guide stars are acquired by moveable arms called "star enlargers," each of which contains its own optical path. The Pathfinder was shipped from MPIA in Heidelberg, Germany to the LBT mountain lab on Mt. Graham, Arizona in February 2013. The system was unpacked, assembled in the LBT clean room, and internally optically aligned. We present the results of our system tests, including star enlarger alignment and system alignment. We also present our immediate plans for on-sky closed loop tests on the LBT scheduled for late Fall. Because plans for all ELTs call for ground layer correction, the Pathfinder provides valuable preliminary information not only for the full LINC-NIRVANA system, but also for future advanced MCAO systems.
  • We present descriptions of the alignment and calibration tests of the Pathfinder, which achieved first light during our 2013 commissioning campaign at the LBT. The full LINC-NIRVANA instrument is a Fizeau interferometric imager with fringe tracking and 2-layer natural guide star multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems on each eye of the LBT. The MCAO correction for each side is achieved using a ground layer wavefront sensor that drives the LBT adaptive secondary mirror and a mid-high layer wavefront sensor that drives a Xinetics 349 actuator DM conjugated to an altitude of 7.1 km. When the LINC-NIRVANA MCAO system is commissioned, it will be one of only two such systems on an 8-meter telescope and the only such system in the northern hemisphere. In order to mitigate risk, we take a modular approach to commissioning by decoupling and testing the LINC-NIRVANA subsystems individually. The Pathfinder is the ground-layer wavefront sensor for the DX eye of the LBT. It uses 12 pyramid wavefront sensors to optically co-add light from natural guide stars in order to make four pupil images that sense ground layer turbulence. Pathfinder is now the first LINC-NIRVANA subsystem to be fully integrated with the telescope and commissioned on sky. Our 2013 commissioning campaign consisted of 7 runs at the LBT with the tasks of assembly, integration and communication with the LBT telescope control system, alignment to the telescope optical axis, off-sky closed loop AO calibration, and finally closed loop on-sky AO. We present the programmatics of this campaign, along with the novel designs of our alignment scheme and our off-sky calibration test, which lead to the Pathfinder's first on-sky closed loop images.
  • MagAO is the new adaptive optics system with visible-light and infrared science cameras, located on the 6.5-m Magellan "Clay" telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The instrument locks on natural guide stars (NGS) from 0$^\mathrm{th}$ to 16$^\mathrm{th}$ $R$-band magnitude, measures turbulence with a modulating pyramid wavefront sensor binnable from 28x28 to 7x7 subapertures, and uses a 585-actuator adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) to provide flat wavefronts to the two science cameras. MagAO is a mutated clone of the similar AO systems at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) at Mt. Graham, Arizona. The high-level AO loop controls up to 378 modes and operates at frame rates up to 1000 Hz. The instrument has two science cameras: VisAO operating from 0.5-1 $\mu$m and Clio2 operating from 1-5 $\mu$m. MagAO was installed in 2012 and successfully completed two commissioning runs in 2012-2013. In April 2014 we had our first science run that was open to the general Magellan community. Observers from Arizona, Carnegie, Australia, Harvard, MIT, Michigan, and Chile took observations in collaboration with the MagAO instrument team. Here we describe the MagAO instrument, describe our on-sky performance, and report our status as of summer 2014.
  • We present data collected using the camera PISCES coupled with the Firt Light Adaptive Optics (FLAO) mounted at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The images were collected using two natural guide stars with an apparent magnitude of R<13 mag. During these observations the seeing was on average ~0.9". The AO performed very well: the images display a mean FWHM of 0.05 arcsec and of 0.06 arcsec in the J- and in the Ks-band, respectively. The Strehl ratio on the quoted images reaches 13-30% (J) and 50-65% (Ks), in the off and in the central pointings respectively. On the basis of this sample we have reached a J-band limiting magnitude of ~22.5 mag and the deepest Ks-band limiting magnitude ever obtained in a crowded stellar field: Ks~23 mag. J-band images display a complex change in the shape of the PSF when moving at larger radial distances from the natural guide star. In particular, the stellar images become more elongated in approaching the corners of the J-band images whereas the Ks-band images are more uniform. We discuss in detail the strategy used to perform accurate and deep photometry in these very challenging images. In particular we will focus our attention on the use of an updated version of ROMAFOT based on asymmetric and analytical Point Spread Functions. The quality of the photometry allowed us to properly identify a feature that clearly shows up in NIR bands: the main sequence knee (MSK). The MSK is independent of the evolutionary age, therefore the difference in magnitude with the canonical clock to constrain the cluster age, the main sequence turn off (MSTO), provides an estimate of the absolute age of the cluster. The key advantage of this new approach is that the error decreases by a factor of two when compared with the classical one. Combining ground-based Ks with space F606W photometry, we estimate the absolute age of M15 to be 13.70+-0.80 Gyr.
  • Recently, Adaptive Secondary Mirrors showed excellent on-sky results in the Near Infrared wavelengths. They currently provide 30mm inter-actuator spacing and about 1 kHz bandwidth. Pushing these devices to be operated at visible wavelengths is a challenging task. Compared to the current systems, working in the infrared, the more demanding requirements are the higher spatial resolution and the greater correction bandwidth. In fact, the turbulence scale is shorter and the parameter variation is faster. Typically, the former is not larger than 25 mm (projected on the secondary mirror) and the latter is 2 kHz, therefore the actuator has to be more slender and faster than the current ones. With a soft magnetic composite core, a dual-stator and a single-mover, VRALA, the actuator discussed in this paper, attains unprecedented performances with a negligible thermal impact. Pre-shaping the current required to deliver a given stroke greatly simplifies the control system, whose output supplies the current generator. As the inductance depends on the mover position, the electronics of this generator, provided with an inductance measure circuit, works also as a displacement sensor, supplying the control system with an accurate feed-back signal. A preliminary prototype, built according to the several FEA thermo-magnetic analyses, has undergone some preliminary laboratory tests. The results of these checks, matching the design results in terms of power and force, show that the the magnetic design addresses the severe specifications.
  • We present diffraction-limited \ks band and \lprime adaptive optics images of the edge-on debris disk around the nearby F2 star HD 15115, obtained with a single 8.4 m primary mirror at the Large Binocular Telescope. At \ks band the disk is detected at signal-to-noise per resolution element (SNRE) \about 3-8 from \about 1-2\fasec 5 (45-113 AU) on the western side, and from \about 1.2-2\fasec 1 (63-90 AU) on the east. At \lprime the disk is detected at SNRE \about 2.5 from \about 1-1\fasec 45 (45-90 AU) on both sides, implying more symmetric disk structure at 3.8 \microns . At both wavelengths the disk has a bow-like shape and is offset from the star to the north by a few AU. A surface brightness asymmetry exists between the two sides of the disk at \ks band, but not at \lprime . The surface brightness at \ks band declines inside 1\asec (\about 45 AU), which may be indicative of a gap in the disk near 1\asec. The \ks - \lprime disk color, after removal of the stellar color, is mostly grey for both sides of the disk. This suggests that scattered light is coming from large dust grains, with 3-10 \microns -sized grains on the east side and 1-10 \microns dust grains on the west. This may suggest that the west side is composed of smaller dust grains than the east side, which would support the interpretation that the disk is being dynamically affected by interactions with the local interstellar medium.
  • As the only directly imaged multiple planet system, HR 8799 provides a unique opportunity to study the physical properties of several planets in parallel. In this paper, we image all four of the HR 8799 planets at H-band and 3.3 microns with the new LBT adaptive optics system, PISCES, and LBTI/LMIRCam. Our images offer an unprecedented view of the system, allowing us to obtain H and 3.3$ micron photometry of the innermost planet (for the first time) and put strong upper-limits on the presence of a hypothetical fifth companion. We find that all four planets are unexpectedly bright at 3.3 microns compared to the equilibrium chemistry models used for field brown dwarfs, which predict that planets should be faint at 3.3 microns due to CH4 opacity. We attempt to model the planets with thick-cloudy, non-equilibrium chemistry atmospheres, but find that removing CH4 to fit the 3.3 micron photometry increases the predicted L' (3.8 microns) flux enough that it is inconsistent with observations. In an effort to fit the SED of the HR 8799 planets, we construct mixtures of cloudy atmospheres, which are intended to represent planets covered by clouds of varying opacity. In this scenario, regions with low opacity look hot and bright, while regions with high opacity look faint, similar to the patchy cloud structures on Jupiter and L/T transition brown-dwarfs. Our mixed cloud models reproduce all of the available data, but self-consistent models are still necessary to demonstrate their viability.
  • The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is a unique telescope featuring two co-mounted optical trains with 8.4m primary mirrors. The telescope Adaptive Optics (AO) system uses two innovative key components, namely an adaptive secondary mirror with 672 actuators and a high-order pyramid wave-front sensor. During the on-sky commissioning such a system reached performances never achieved before on large ground-based optical telescopes. Images with 40mas resolution and Strehl Ratios higher than 80% have been acquired in H band (1.6 micron). Such images showed a contrast as high as 10e-4. Based on these results, we compare the performances offered by a Natural Guide Star (NGS) system upgraded with the state-of-the-art technology and those delivered by existing Laser Guide Star (LGS) systems. The comparison, in terms of sky coverage and performances, suggests rethinking the current role ascribed to NGS and LGS in the next generation of AO systems for the 8-10 meter class telescopes and Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs).
  • Context: Current instrument developments at the largest telescopes worldwide have provisions for Multi-Conjugated Adaptive Optics (MCAO) modules. The large field of view and more uniform correction provided by these systems is not only highly beneficial for photometric studies but also for astrometric analysis of, e.g., large dense clusters and exoplanet detection and characterization. The Multi-conjugated Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD) is the first such instrument and was temporarily installed and tested at the ESO/VLT in 2007. We analyzed two globular cluster data sets in terms of achievable astrometric precision. Data were obtained in the layer-oriented correction mode, one in full MCAO correction mode with two layers corrected (NGC 6388) and the other applying ground-layer correction only (47 Tuc). Aims: We aim at analyzing the first available MCAO imaging data in the layer-oriented mode obtained with the MAD instrument in terms of astrometric precision and stability. Methods: We calculated Strehl maps for each frame in both data sets. Distortion corrections were performed and the astrometric precision was analyzed by calculating mean stellar positions over all frames and by investigation of the positional residuals present in each frame after transformation to a master-coordinate-frame. Results: The mean positional precision for stars between K = 14-18 mag is ~1.2 mas in the full MCAO correction mode data of the cluster NGC 6388. The precision measured in the GLAO data (47 Tuc) reaches ~1.0 mas for stars corresponding to 2MASS K magnitudes between 9 and 12. The observations were such that stars in these magnitude ranges correspond to the same detector flux range. The jitter movement used to scan a larger field of view introduced additional distortions in the frames, leading to a degradation of the achievable precision.
  • The Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator, MAD, successfully demonstrated on sky the MCAO technique both in Layer Oriented and Star Oriented modes. As results of the Guaranteed Time Observations in Layer Oriented mode quality astronomy papers have been published. In this paper we concentrate on the instrumentation issues and technical aspects which stay behind this success.
  • The VLT Survey Telescope is a f/5.5 modified Ritchey-Chretien imaging telescope, which is being installed at the ESO-Paranal Observatory. It will provide a one square degree corrected field of view to perform survey-projects in the wavelength range from UV to I band. In this paper we describe the opto-mechanical alignment procedure of the 2.61m primary mirror, the secondary and correctors lenses onto the mechanical structure of the telescope. The alignment procedure does not rely on the mechanical precision of the mirrors. It will be achieved using ad-hoc alignment tools, described in the paper, which allows the spatial determination of optical axes (and focuses where necessary) of the optical components with respect to the axis defined by the rotation of a laser beam mounted on the instrument bearing.
  • LINC-NIRVANA will realize the interferometric imaging focal station of the Large Binocular Telescope. A double Layer Oriented multi-conjugate adaptive optics system assists the two arms of the interferometer, supplying high order wave-front correction. In order to counterbalance the field rotation, mechanical derotation for the two ground wave-front sensors, and optical derotators for the mid-high layers sensors fix the positions of the focal planes with respect to the pyramids aboard the wave-front sensors. The derotation introduces pupil images rotation on the wavefront sensors: the projection of the deformable mirrors on the sensor consequently change. The proper adjustment of the control matrix will be applied in real-time through numerical computation of the new matrix. In this paper we investigate the temporal and computational aspects related to the pupils rotation, explicitly computing the wave-front errors that may be generated.
  • The Multiconjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD) for ESO-Very Large Telescopes (VLT) will demonstrate on sky the MultiConjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) technique. In this paper the laboratory tests relative to the first preliminary acceptance in Europe of the Layer Oriented (LO) Wavefront Sensor (WFS) for MAD will be described: the capabilities of the LO approach have been checked and the ability of the WFS to measure phase screens positioned at different altitudes has been experimented. The LO WFS was opto-mechanically integrated and aligned in INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri before the delivering to ESO (Garching) to be installed on the final optical bench. The LO WFS looks for up to 8 reference stars on a 2arcmin Field of View and up to 8 pyramids can be positioned where the focal spot images of the reference stars form, splitting the light in four beams. Then two objectives conjugated at different altitudes simultaneously produce a quadruple pupil image of each reference star.
  • One of the key-points for the future developments of the multiconjugate adaptive optics for the astronomy is the availability of the correction for a large fraction of the sky. The sky coverage represents one of the limits of the existing single reference adaptive optics system. Multiconjugate adaptive optics allows to overcome the limitations due to the small corrected field of view and the Layer Oriented approach, in particular by its Multiple Field of View version, increases the number of possible references using also very faint stars to guide the adaptive systems. In this paper we study the sky coverage problem in the Layer Oriented case, using both numerical and analytical approaches. Taking into account a star catalogue and a star luminosity distribution function we run a lot of numerical simulation sequences using the Layer Oriented Simulation Tool (LOST). Moreover we perform for several cases a detailed optimization procedure and a relative full simulation in order to achieve better performance for the considered system in those particular conditions. In this way we can retrieve a distribution of numerically simulated cases that allows computing the sky coverage with respect to a performance parameter as the Strehl Ratio and to the scientific field size.
  • The Multiconjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD) has successfully demonstrated on sky both Star Oriented (SO) and Layer Oriented (LO) multiconjugate adaptive optics techniques. While SO has been realized using 3 Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFS), we designed a multi-pyramid WFS for the LO. The MAD bench accommodates both WFSs and a selecting mirror allows choosing which sensor to use. In the LO approach up to 8 pyramids can be placed on as many reference stars and their light is co-added optically on two different CCDs conjugated at ground and to an high layer. In this paper we discuss LO commissioning phase and on sky operations.
  • On certain extent the behavior of the Adaptive Optics correction for Extremely Large Telescope scales with diameter size. But in Ground Layer Adaptive Optics the combined effect of a Large Field of View and the large overlap of Guide Stars pupil footprints at high atmospheric altitude introduces severe changes in the behavior of the correction returning a very different distribution of the energy going from known 8-10meter to 100m diameters. In this paper we identify the reasons and the ways of these different behaviors.