• We present the results of two-component (disc+bar) and three-component (disc+bar+bulge) multiwavelength 2D photometric decompositions of barred galaxies in five SDSS bands ($ugriz$). This sample of $\sim$3,500 nearby ($z<0.06$) galaxies with strong bars selected from the Galaxy Zoo citizen science project is the largest sample of barred galaxies to be studied using photometric decompositions which include a bar component. With detailed structural analysis we obtain physical quantities such as the bar- and bulge-to-total luminosity ratios, effective radii, S\'ersic indices and colours of the individual components. We observe a clear difference in the colours of the components, the discs being bluer than the bars and bulges. An overwhelming fraction of bulge components have S\'ersic indices consistent with being pseudobulges. By comparing the barred galaxies with a mass-matched and volume-limited sample of unbarred galaxies, we examine the connection between the presence of a large-scale galactic bar and the properties of discs and bulges. We find that the discs of unbarred galaxies are significantly bluer compared to the discs of barred galaxies, while there is no significant difference in the colours of the bulges. We find possible evidence of secular evolution via bars that leads to the build-up of pseudobulges and to the quenching of star formation in the discs. We identify a subsample of unbarred galaxies with an inner lens/oval and find that their properties are similar to barred galaxies, consistent with an evolutionary scenario in which bars dissolve into lenses. This scenario deserves further investigation through both theoretical and observational work.
  • In this paper we study the morphological properties of spiral galaxies, including measurements of spiral arm number and pitch angle. Using Galaxy Zoo 2, a stellar mass-complete sample of 6,222 SDSS spiral galaxies is selected. We use the machine vision algorithm SpArcFiRe to identify spiral arm features and measure their associated geometries. A support vector machine classifier is employed to identify reliable spiral features, with which we are able to estimate pitch angles for half of our sample. We use these machine measurements to calibrate visual estimates of arm tightness, and hence estimate pitch angles for our entire sample. The properties of spiral arms are compared with respect to various galaxy properties. The star formation properties of galaxies vary significantly with arm number, but not pitch angle. We find that galaxies hosting strong bars have spiral arms substantially ($4-6^\mathrm{o}$) looser than unbarred galaxies. Accounting for this, spiral arms associated with many-arm structures are looser (by 2$^\mathrm{o}$) than those in two-arm galaxies. In contrast to this average trend, galaxies with greater bulge-to-total stellar mass ratios display both fewer and looser spiral arms. This effect is primarily driven by the galaxy disc, such that galaxies with more massive discs contain more spiral arms with tighter pitch angles. This implies that galaxy central mass concentration is not the dominant cause of pitch angle and arm number variations between galaxies, which in turn suggests that not all spiral arms are governed by classical density waves or modal theories.
  • We use multi-wavelength SDSS images and Galaxy Zoo morphologies to identify a sample of $\sim$$270$ late-type galaxies with an off-centre bar. We measure offsets in the range 0.2-2.5 kpc between the photometric centres of the stellar disc and stellar bar. The measured offsets correlate with global asymmetries of the galaxies, with those with largest offsets showing higher lopsidedness. These findings are in good agreement with predictions from simulations of dwarf-dwarf tidal interactions producing off-centre bars. We find that the majority of galaxies with off-centre bars are of Magellanic type, with a median mass of $10^{9.6} M_{\odot}$, and 91% of them having $M_{\star}<3\times10^{10} M_{\odot}$, the characteristic mass at which galaxies start having higher central concentrations attributed to the presence of bulges. We conduct a search for companions to test the hypothesis of tidal interactions, but find that a similar fraction of galaxies with offset bars have companions within 100 kpc as galaxies with centred bars. Although this may be due to the incompleteness of the SDSS spectroscopic survey at the faint end, alternative scenarios that give rise to offset bars such as interactions with dark companions or the effect of lopsided halo potentials should be considered. Future observations are needed to confirm possible low mass companion candidates and to determine the shape of the dark matter halo, in order to find the explanation for the off-centre bars in these galaxies.
  • We study the significance of mergers in the quenching of star formation in galaxies at z~1 by examining their color-mass distributions for different morphology types. We perform two-dimensional light profile fits to GOODS iz images of ~5000 galaxies and X-ray selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) hosts in the CANDELS/GOODS-north and south fields in the redshift range 0.7<z<1.3. Distinguishing between bulge-dominated and disk-dominated morphologies, we find that disks and spheroids have distinct color-mass distributions, in agreement with studies at z~0. The smooth distribution across colors for the disk galaxies corresponds to a slow exhaustion of gas, with no fast quenching event. Meanwhile, blue spheroids most likely come from major mergers of star-forming disk galaxies, and the dearth of spheroids at intermediate green colors is suggestive of rapid quenching. The distribution of moderate luminosity X-ray AGN hosts is even across colors, in contrast, and we find similar numbers and distributions among the two morphology types with no apparent dependence on Eddington ratio. The high fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies that host an AGN in the blue cloud and green valley is consistent with the scenario in which the AGN is triggered after a major merger, and the host galaxy then quickly evolves into the green valley. This suggests AGN feedback may play a role in the quenching of star formation in the minority of galaxies that undergo major mergers.
  • We present the data release paper for the Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) project. This is the third phase in a large effort to measure reliable, detailed morphologies of galaxies by using crowdsourced visual classifications of colour composite images. Images in GZH were selected from various publicly-released Hubble Space Telescope Legacy programs conducted with the Advanced Camera for Surveys, with filters that probe the rest-frame optical emission from galaxies out to $z \sim 1$. The bulk of the sample is selected to have $m_{I814W} < 23.5$,but goes as faint as $m_{I814W} < 26.8$ for deep images combined over 5 epochs. The median redshift of the combined samples is $z = 0.9 \pm 0.6$, with a tail extending out to $z \sim 4$. The GZH morphological data include measurements of both bulge- and disk-dominated galaxies, details on spiral disk structure that relate to the Hubble type, bar identification, and numerous measurements of clump identification and geometry. This paper also describes a new method for calibrating morphologies for galaxies of different luminosities and at different redshifts by using artificially-redshifted galaxy images as a baseline. The GZH catalogue contains both raw and calibrated morphological vote fractions for 119,849 galaxies, providing the largest dataset to date suitable for large-scale studies of galaxy evolution out to $z \sim 1$.
  • Selecting centrally quiescent galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to create high signal-to-noise (>100) stacked spectra with minimal emission line contamination, we accurately and precisely model the central stellar populations of barred and unbarred quiescent disk galaxies. By splitting our sample by redshift, we can use the fixed size of the SDSS fiber to model the stellar populations at different radii within galaxies. At 0.02<z<0.04, the SDSS fiber radius corresponds to ~1 kpc, which is the typical half-light radii of both classical bulges and disky pseudobulges. Assuming that the SDSS fiber primarily covers the bulges at these redshifts, our analysis shows that there are no significant differences in the stellar populations, i.e., stellar age, [Fe/H], [Mg/Fe], and [N/Fe], of the bulges of barred vs. unbarred quiescent disk galaxies. Modeling the stellar populations at different redshift intervals from z=0.020 to z=0.085 at fixed stellar masses produces an estimate of the stellar population gradients out to about half the typical effective radius of our sample, assuming null evolution over this ~1 Gyr epoch. We find that there are no noticeable differences in the slopes of the azimuthally averaged gradients of barred vs. unbarred quiescent disk galaxies. These results suggest that bars are not a strong influence on the chemical evolution of quiescent disk galaxies.
  • We study the influence of the presence of a strong bar in disc galaxies which host an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and morphological classifications from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project, we create a volume-limited sample of 19,756 disc galaxies at $0.01<z<0.05$ which have been visually examined for the presence of a bar. Within this sample, AGN host galaxies have a higher overall percentage of bars (51.8%) than inactive galaxies exhibiting central star formation (37.1%). This difference is primarily due to known effects; that the presence of both AGN and galactic bars is strongly correlated with both the stellar mass and integrated colour of the host galaxy. We control for this effect by examining the difference in AGN fraction between barred and unbarred galaxies in fixed bins of mass and colour. Once this effect is accounted for, there remains a small but statistically significant increase that represents 16% of the average barred AGN fraction. Using the $L_{\rm{[O III]}}/M_{BH} $ratio as a measure of AGN strength, we show that barred AGN do not exhibit stronger accretion than unbarred AGN at a fixed mass and colour. The data are consistent with a model in which bar-driven fueling does contribute to the probability of an actively growing black hole, but in which other dynamical mechanisms must contribute to the direct AGN fueling via smaller, non-axisymmetric perturbations.
  • We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS, COSMOS, and GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disc galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. We use a novel method to robustly compare a sample of 120 AGN host galaxies, defined to have 10^42 erg/s < L_X < 10^44 erg/s, with inactive control galaxies matched in stellar mass, rest-frame colour, size, Sersic index, and redshift. Using the GZH bar classifications of each sample, we demonstrate that AGN hosts show no statistically significant enhancement in bar fraction or average bar likelihood compared to closely-matched inactive galaxies. In detail, we find that the AGN bar fraction cannot be enhanced above the control bar fraction by more than a factor of two, at 99.7% confidence. We similarly find no significant difference in the AGN fraction among barred and non-barred galaxies. Thus we find no compelling evidence that large-scale bars directly fuel AGN at 0.2<z<1.0. This result, coupled with previous results at z=0, implies that moderate-luminosity AGN have not been preferentially fed by large-scale bars since z=1. Furthermore, given the low bar fractions at z>1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fueling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.
  • We present an analysis of the environmental dependence of bars and bulges in disc galaxies, using a volume-limited catalogue of 15810 galaxies at z<0.06 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with visual morphologies from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project. We find that the likelihood of having a bar, or bulge, in disc galaxies increases when the galaxies have redder (optical) colours and larger stellar masses, and observe a transition in the bar and bulge likelihoods, such that massive disc galaxies are more likely to host bars and bulges. We use galaxy clustering methods to demonstrate statistically significant environmental correlations of barred, and bulge-dominated, galaxies, from projected separations of 150 kpc/h to 3 Mpc/h. These environmental correlations appear to be independent of each other: i.e., bulge-dominated disc galaxies exhibit a significant bar-environment correlation, and barred disc galaxies show a bulge-environment correlation. We demonstrate that approximately half (50 +/- 10%) of the bar-environment correlation can be explained by the fact that more massive dark matter haloes host redder disc galaxies, which are then more likely to have bars. Likewise, we show that the environmental dependence of stellar mass can only explain a small fraction (25 +/- 10%) of the bar-environment correlation. Therefore, a significant fraction of our observed environmental dependence of barred galaxies is not due to colour or stellar mass dependences, and hence could be due to another galaxy property. Finally, by analyzing the projected clustering of barred and unbarred disc galaxies with halo occupation models, we argue that barred galaxies are in slightly higher-mass haloes than unbarred ones, and some of them (approximately 25%) are satellite galaxies in groups. We also discuss implications about the effects of minor mergers and interactions on bar formation.
  • We determine star formation rates (SFRs) in a sample of color-selected, star-forming (sBzK) galaxies (K(AB)<21.8) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field - South. To identify and avoid active galactic nuclei, we use X-ray, IRAC color, and IR/radio flux ratio selection methods. Photometric redshift-binned, average flux densities are measured with stacking analyses in Spitzer-MIPS IR, BLAST and APEX/LABOCA submillimeter, VLA and GMRT radio and Chandra X-ray data. We include averages of aperture fluxes in MUSYC UBVRIz'JHK images to determine UV-through-radio spectral energy distributions. We determine the total IR luminosities and compare SFR calibrations from FIR, 24 micron, UV, radio and X-ray wavebands. We find consistency with our best estimator, SFR(IR+UV), to within errors for the preferred radio SFR calibration. Our results imply that 24 micron only and X-ray SFR estimates should be applied to high redshift galaxies with caution. Average IR luminosities are consistent with luminous infrared galaxies. We find SFR(IR+UV) for our stacked sBzKs at median redshifts 1.4, 1.8, and 2.2 to be 55+/-6 (random error), 74+/-8 and 154+/-17 Msun yr^-1 respectively, with additional systematic uncertainty of a factor of ~2.
  • We present the rest-frame optical morphologies of active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies at 1.5<z<3, using near-infrared imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3, the first such study of AGN host galaxies at these redshifts. The AGN are X-ray selected from the Chandra Deep Field South and have typical luminosities of 1E42 < L_X < 1E44 erg/s. Accreting black holes in this luminosity and redshift range account for a substantial fraction of the total space density and black hole mass growth over cosmic time; they thus represent an important mode of black hole growth in the universe. We find that the majority (~80%) of the host galaxies of these AGN have low Sersic indices indicative of disk-dominated light profiles, suggesting that secular processes govern a significant fraction of the cosmic growth of black holes. That is, many black holes in the present-day universe grew much of their mass in disk-dominated galaxies and not in early-type galaxies or major mergers. The properties of the AGN host galaxies are furthermore indistinguishable from their parent galaxy population and we find no strong evolution in either effective radii or morphological mix between z~2 and z~0.05.
  • We take advantage of the rich multi-wavelength data available in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), including the 4 Msec Chandra observations (the deepest X-ray data to date), in order to search for heavily-obscured low-luminosity AGN among infrared-luminous galaxies. In particular, we obtained a stacked rest-frame X-ray spectrum for samples of galaxies binned in terms of their IR luminosity or stellar mass. We detect a significant signal at E~1 to 8 keV, which we interpret as originating from a combination of emission associated with star-formation processes at low energies combined with a heavily-obscured AGN at E>5 keV. We further find that the relative strength of this AGN signal decays with decreasing IR luminosity, indicating a higher AGN fraction for more luminous IR sources. Together, these results strongly suggest the presence of a large number of obscured AGN in IR-luminous galaxies. Using samples binned in terms of stellar mass in the host galaxy, we find a significant excess at E=6-7 keV for sources with M>10^{11} Msun, consistent with a large obscured AGN population in high mass galaxies. In contrast, no strong evidence of AGN activity was found for less-massive galaxies. The integrated intensity at high energies indicates that a significant fraction of the total black hole growth, ~22%, occurs in heavily-obscured systems that are not individually detected in even the deepest X-ray observations. There are also indications that the number of low-luminosity, heavily-obscured AGN does not evolve significantly with redshift, in contrast to the strong evolution seen in higher luminosity sources.
  • Using new, highly accurate photometric redshifts from the MUSYC medium-band survey in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S), we fit synthetic stellar population models to compare AGN host galaxies to inactive galaxies at 0.8 < z < 1.2. We find that AGN host galaxies are predominantly massive galaxies on the red sequence and in the green valley of the color-mass diagram. Because both passive and dusty galaxies can appear red in optical colors, we use rest-frame near-infrared colors to separate passively evolving stellar populations from galaxies that are reddened by dust. As with the overall galaxy population, ~25% of the `red' AGN host galaxies and ~75% of the `green' AGN host galaxies have colors consistent with young stellar populations reddened by dust. The dust-corrected rest-frame optical colors are the blue colors of star-forming galaxies, which implies that these AGN hosts are not passively aging to the red sequence. At z~1, AGN activity is roughly evenly split between two modes of black hole growth: the first in passively evolving host galaxies, which may be heating up the galaxy's gas and preventing future episodes of star formation, and the second in dust-reddened young galaxies, which may be ionizing the galaxy's interstellar medium and shutting down star formation.
  • We present deep optical 18-medium-band photometry from the Subaru telescope over the ~30' x 30' Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDF-S), as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). This field has a wealth of ground- and space-based ancillary data, and contains the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. We combine the Subaru imaging with existing UBVRIzJHK and Spitzer IRAC images to create a uniform catalog. Detecting sources in the MUSYC BVR image we find ~40,000 galaxies with R_AB<25.3, the median 5 sigma limit of the 18 medium bands. Photometric redshifts are determined using the EAZY code and compared to ~2000 spectroscopic redshifts in this field. The medium band filters provide very accurate redshifts for the (bright) subset of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, particularly at 0.1 < z < 1.2 and at z > 3.5. For 0.1 < z < 1.2, we find a 1 sigma scatter in \Delta z/(1+z) of 0.007, similar to results obtained with a similar filter set in the COSMOS field. As a demonstration of the data quality, we show that the red sequence and blue cloud can be cleanly identified in rest-frame color-magnitude diagrams at 0.1 < z < 1.2. We find that ~20% of the red-sequence-galaxies show evidence of dust-emission at longer rest-frame wavelengths. The reduced images, photometric catalog, and photometric redshifts are provided through the public MUSYC website.
  • We use data from large surveys of the local Universe (SDSS+Galaxy Zoo) to show that the galaxy-black hole connection is linked to host morphology at a fundamental level. The fraction of early-type galaxies with actively growing black holes, and therefore the AGN duty cycle, declines significantly with increasing black hole mass. Late-type galaxies exhibit the opposite trend: the fraction of actively growing black holes increases with black hole mass.
  • We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and visual classifications of morphology from the Galaxy Zoo project to study black hole growth in the nearby Universe (z < 0.05) and to break down the AGN host galaxy population by color, stellar mass and morphology. We find that black hole growth at luminosities L_OIII >1E40 erg/s in early- and late-type galaxies is fundamentally different. AGN host galaxies as a population have a broad range of stellar masses (1E10-1E11 Msun), reside in the green valley of the color-mass diagram and their central black holes have median masses around 1E6.5 Msun. However, by comparing early- and late-type AGN host galaxies to their non-active counterparts, we find several key differences: in early-type galaxies, it is preferentially the galaxies with the least massive black holes that are growing, while late-type galaxies, it is preferentially the most massive}black holes that are growing. The duty cycle of AGN in early-type galaxies is strongly peaked in the green valley below the low-mass end (1E10 Msun) of the red sequence at stellar masses where there is a steady supply of blue cloud progenitors. The duty cycle of AGN in late-type galaxies on the other hand peaks in massive (1E11 Msun) green and red late-types which generally do not have a corresponding blue cloud population of similar mass. At high Eddington ratios (L/L_Edd > 0.1), the only population with a substantial fraction of AGN are the low-mass green valley early-type galaxies. Finally, the Milky Way likely resides in the "sweet spot" on the color-mass diagram where the AGN duty cycle of late-type galaxies is highest. We discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of the role of AGN in the evolution of galaxies
  • We investigate a class of rapidly growing emission line galaxies, known as "Green Peas", first noted by volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project because of their peculiar bright green colour and small size, unresolved in SDSS imaging. Their appearance is due to very strong optical emission lines, namely [O III] 5007 A, with an unusually large equivalent width of up to ~1000 A. We discuss a well-defined sample of 251 colour-selected objects, most of which are strongly star forming, although there are some AGN interlopers including 8 newly discovered narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies. The star-forming Peas are low mass galaxies (M~10^8.5 - 10^10 M_sun) with high star formation rates (~10 M_sun/yr), low metallicities (log[O/H] + 12 ~ 8.7) and low reddening (E(B-V) < 0.25) and they reside in low density environments. They have some of the highest specific star formation rates (up to ~10^{-8} yr^{-1}) seen in the local Universe, yielding doubling times for their stellar mass of hundreds of Myrs. The few star-forming Peas with HST imaging appear to have several clumps of bright star-forming regions and low surface density features that may indicate recent or ongoing mergers. The Peas are similar in size, mass, luminosity and metallicity to Luminous Blue Compact Galaxies. They are also similar to high redshift UV-luminous galaxies, e.g., Lyman-break galaxies and Lyman-alpha emitters, and therefore provide a local laboratory with which to study the extreme star formation processes that occur in high-redshift galaxies. Studying starbursting galaxies as a function of redshift is essential to understanding the build up of stellar mass in the Universe.
  • We present the mid-infrared colors of X-ray-detected AGN and explore mid-infrared selection criteria. Using a statistical matching technique, the likelihood ratio, over 900 IRAC counterparts were identified with a new MUSYC X-ray source catalog that includes ~1000 published X-ray sources in the Chandra Deep Field-South and Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. Most X-ray-selected AGN have IRAC spectral shapes consistent with power-law slopes, f_{nu} ~ nu^{alpha}, and display a wide range of colors, -2 < alpha < 2. Although X-ray sources typically fit to redder (more negative alpha) power-laws than non-X-ray detected galaxies, more than 50% do have flat or blue (galaxy-like) spectral shapes in the observed 3-8 micron band. Only a quarter of the X-ray selected AGN detected at 24 micron are well fit by featureless red power laws in the observed 3.6-24 micron, likely the subset of our sample whose infrared spectra are dominated by emission from the central AGN region. Most IRAC color-selection criteria fail to identify the majority of X-ray-selected AGN, finding only the more luminous AGN, the majority of which have broad emission lines. In deep surveys, these color-selection criteria select 10-20% of the entire galaxy population and miss many moderate luminosity AGN.
  • We have compared the X-ray--to--optical flux ratios (F_x/F_opt) of absorbed active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the Chandra Deep Field North (CDF-N) with those of nearby, optically classified Seyfert 2 galaxies. The comparison provides an opportunity to explore the extent to which the local population of absorbed AGNs can account for the properties of the distant, spectroscopically ambiguous sources that produce the hard X-ray background. Our nearby sample consists of 38 objects that well represent the local Seyfert 2 luminosity function. Integrated UBVRI photometry and broadband X-ray observations are presented. Using these data, we have simulated the F_x/F_opt ratios that local Seyfert 2s would exhibit if they were observed in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 1.3 as part of the CDF-N. In the simulations we account for the effects of redshift on flux measurements in fixed observed-frame bands, and the way the luminosity function of a given population is sampled in a flux-limited survey like the CDF-N. Overall, we find excellent agreement between our simulations and the observed distribution of F_x/F_opt ratios for absorbed AGNs in the CDF-N. Our analysis has thus failed to reveal any physical differences between the local population of Seyfert 2s and CDF-N sources with similar X-ray properties. These results support the hypothesis that the nuclear emission lines of many distant hard X-ray galaxies are hidden in ground-based spectra due to a combination of observational effects: signal-to-noise ratio, wavelength coverage, and dilution by host-galaxy light.