• The distribution of Ly$\alpha$ emission is an presently accessible method for studying the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) into the reionization era. We carried out deep spectroscopic observations in order to search for Ly$\alpha$ emission from galaxies with photometric redshifts $z$ = 5.5 - 8.3 selected from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). Utilizing data from the Keck/DEIMOS spectrograph, we explore a wavelength coverage of Ly$\alpha$ emission at $z$ ~ 5 - 7 with four nights of spectroscopic observations for 118 galaxies, detecting five emission lines with ~ 5$\sigma$ significance: three in the GOODS-N and two in the GOODS-S field. We constrain the equivalent width (EW) distribution of Ly$\alpha$ emission by comparing the number of detected objects with the expected number constructed from detailed simulations of mock emission lines that account for the observational conditions (e.g., exposure time, wavelength coverage, and sky emission) and galaxy photometric redshift probability distribution functions. The Ly$\alpha$ EW distribution is well described by an exponential form, $\text{dN/dEW}\propto \text{exp(-EW/}W_0)$, characterized by the $e$-folding scale ($W_0$) of ~ 60 - 100$\AA$ at 0.3 < $z$ < 6. By contrast, our measure of the Ly$\alpha$ EW distribution at 6.0 < $z$ < 7.0 rejects a Ly$\alpha$ EW distribution with $W_0$ > 36.4$\AA$ (125.3$\AA$) at 1$\sigma$ (2$\sigma$) significance. This provides additional evidence that the EW distribution of Ly$\alpha$ declines at $z$ > 6, suggesting an increasing fraction of neutral hydrogen in the IGM at that epoch.
  • We study the effects of galaxy environment on the evolution of the stellar-mass function (SMF) over 0.2 < z < 2.0 using the FourStar Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) survey and NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS) down to the stellar-mass completeness limit, log M / Msun > 9.0 (9.5) at z = 1.0 (2.0). We compare the SMFs for quiescent and star-forming galaxies in the highest and lowest environments using a density estimator based on the distance to the galaxies' third-nearest neighbors. For star-forming galaxies, at all redshifts there are only minor differences with environment in the shape of the SMF. For quiescent galaxies, the SMF in the lowest densities shows no evolution with redshift, other than an overall increase in number density (phi*) with time. This suggests that the stellar-mass dependence of quenching in relatively isolated galaxies is both universal and does not evolve strongly. While at z >~ 1.5 the SMF of quiescent galaxies is indistinguishable in the highest and lowest densities, at lower redshifts it shows a rapidly increasing number density of lower-mass galaxies, log M / Msun ~= 9-10. We argue this evolution can account for all the redshift evolution in the shape of the total quiescent-galaxy SMF. This evolution in the quiescent-galaxy SMF at higher redshift (z > 1) requires an environmental-quenching efficiency that decreases with decreasing stellar mass at 0.5 < z < 1.5 or it would overproduce the number of lower-mass quiescent galaxies in denser environments. This requires a dominant environment process such as starvation combined with rapid gas depletion and ejection at z > 0.5 - 1.0 for galaxies in our mass range. The efficiency of this process decreases with redshift allowing other processes (such as galaxy interactions and ram-pressure stripping) to become more important at later times, z < 0.5.
  • We obtained ALMA spectroscopy and imaging to investigate the origin of the unexpected sub-mm emission toward the most distant quiescent galaxy known to date, ZF-COSMOS-20115 at z=3.717. We show here that this sub-mm emission is produced by another massive, compact and extremely obscured galaxy, located only 3.1 kpc away from the quiescent galaxy. We dub the quiescent and dusty galaxies Jekyll and Hyde, respectively. No dust emission is detected at the location of Jekyll, implying SFR < 13 Msun/yr, which is the most stringent upper limit ever obtained for a quiescent galaxy at these redshifts. The two sources are confirmed to lie at the same redshift thanks to the detection of [CII]158 in Hyde, which provides one the few robust redshifts for an "H-dropout" galaxy. The line has a rotating-disk velocity profile blueshifted from Jekyll by 549+/-60 km/s, demonstrating that it is produced by another galaxy. Careful de-blending of the Spitzer imaging confirms the existence of Hyde, and its non-detection with Hubble requires extreme attenuation by dust. Modeling the photometry of both galaxies shows that Jekyll has fully quenched >200 Myr prior to observation and still presents a challenge for models, while Hyde only harbors moderate star-formation (SFR<120 Msun/yr) and is located at least a factor 1.4 below the z~4 main sequence. Hyde could also have stopped forming stars <200 Myr before being observed, which would be consistent with its hight compactness similar to z~4 quiescent galaxies and its low [CII]/FIR ratio, but significant SF cannot be ruled out. Finally, we show that Hyde hosts a dense reservoir of gas comparable to that of extreme starbursts, suggesting that its SFR was reduced without expelling the gas outside of the galaxy. We argue that Jekyll and Hyde can be seen as two stages of quenching, and provide a unique laboratory to study this poorly understood phenomenon. [abridged]
  • We investigate the relationship between the black hole accretion rate (BHAR) and star-formation rate (SFR) for Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31)-mass progenitors from z = 0.2 - 2.5. We source galaxies from the Ks-band selected ZFOURGE survey, which includes multi-wavelenth data spanning 0.3 - 160um. We use decomposition software to split the observed SEDs of our galaxies into their active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-forming components, which allows us to estimate BHARs and SFRs from the infrared (IR). We perform tests to check the robustness of these estimates, including a comparison to BHARs and SFRs derived from X-ray stacking and far-IR analysis, respectively. We find as the progenit- ors evolve, their relative black hole-galaxy growth (i.e. their BHAR/SFR ratio) increases from low to high redshift. The MW-mass progenitors exhibit a log-log slope of 0.64 +/- 0.11, while the M31-mass progenitors are 0.39 +/- 0.08. This result contrasts with previous studies that find an almost flat slope when adopting X-ray/AGN-selected or mass-limited samples and is likely due to their use of a broad mixture of galaxies with different evolutionary histories. Our use of progenitor-matched samples highlights the potential importance of carefully selecting progenitors when searching for evolutionary relationships between BHAR/SFRs. Additionally, our finding that BHAR/SFR ratios do not track the rate at which progenitors quench casts doubts over the idea that the suppression of star-formation is predominantly driven by luminous AGN feedback (i.e. high BHARs).
  • We present an extremely deep CO(1-0) observation of a confirmed $z=1.62$ galaxy cluster. We detect two spectroscopically confirmed cluster members in CO(1-0) with $S/N>5$. Both galaxies have log(${\cal M_{\star}}$/\msol)$>11$ and are gas rich, with ${\cal M}_{\rm mol}$/(${\cal M_{\star}}+{\cal M}_{\rm mol}$)$\sim 0.17-0.45$. One of these galaxies lies on the star formation rate (SFR)-${\cal M_{\star}}$ sequence while the other lies an order of magnitude below. We compare the cluster galaxies to other SFR-selected galaxies with CO measurements and find that they have CO luminosities consistent with expectations given their infrared luminosities. We also find that they have comparable gas fractions and star formation efficiencies (SFE) to what is expected from published field galaxy scaling relations. The galaxies are compact in their stellar light distribution, at the extreme end for all high redshift star-forming galaxies. However, their SFE is consistent with other field galaxies at comparable compactness. This is similar to two other sources selected in a blind CO survey of the HDF-N. Despite living in a highly quenched proto-cluster core, the molecular gas properties of these two galaxies, one of which may be in the processes of quenching, appear entirely consistent with field scaling relations between the molecular gas content, stellar mass, star formation rate, and redshift. We speculate that these cluster galaxies cannot have any further substantive gas accretion if they are to become members of the dominant passive population in $z<1$ clusters.
  • We study galactic star-formation activity as a function of environment and stellar mass over 0.5<z<2.0 using the FourStar Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) survey. We estimate the galaxy environment using a Bayesian-motivated measure of the distance to the third nearest neighbor for galaxies to the stellar mass completeness of our survey, $\log(M/M_\odot)>9 (9.5)$ at z=1.3 (2.0). This method, when applied to a mock catalog with the photometric-redshift precision ($\sigma_z / (1+z) \lesssim 0.02$), recovers galaxies in low- and high-density environments accurately. We quantify the environmental quenching efficiency, and show that at z> 0.5 it depends on galaxy stellar mass, demonstrating that the effects of quenching related to (stellar) mass and environment are not separable. In high-density environments, the mass and environmental quenching efficiencies are comparable for massive galaxies ($\log (M/M_\odot)\gtrsim$ 10.5) at all redshifts. For lower mass galaxies ($\log (M/M)_\odot) \lesssim$ 10), the environmental quenching efficiency is very low at $z\gtrsim$ 1.5, but increases rapidly with decreasing redshift. Environmental quenching can account for nearly all quiescent lower mass galaxies ($\log(M/M_\odot) \sim$ 9-10), which appear primarily at $z\lesssim$ 1.0. The morphologies of lower mass quiescent galaxies are inconsistent with those expected of recently quenched star-forming galaxies. Some environmental process must transform the morphologies on similar timescales as the environmental quenching itself. The evolution of the environmental quenching favors models that combine gas starvation (as galaxies become satellites) with gas exhaustion through star-formation and outflows ("overconsumption"), and additional processes such as galaxy interactions, tidal stripping and disk fading to account for the morphological differences between the quiescent and star-forming galaxy populations.
  • We explore observational and theoretical constraints on how galaxies might transition between the "star-forming main sequence" (SFMS) and varying "degrees of quiescence" out to $z=3$. Our analysis is focused on galaxies with stellar mass $M_*>10^{10}M_{\odot}$, and is enabled by GAMA and CANDELS observations, a semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation, and a cosmological hydrodynamical "zoom in" simulation with momentum-driven AGN feedback. In both the observations and the SAM, transition galaxies tend to have intermediate S\'ersic indices, half-light radii, and surface stellar mass densities compared to star-forming and quiescent galaxies out to $z=3$. We place an observational upper limit on the average population transition timescale as a function of redshift, finding that the average high-redshift galaxy is on a "fast track" for quenching whereas the average low-redshift galaxy is on a "slow track" for quenching. We qualitatively identify four physical origin scenarios for transition galaxies in the SAM: oscillations on the SFMS, slow quenching, fast quenching, and rejuvenation. Quenching timescales in both the SAM and the hydrodynamical simulation are not fast enough to reproduce the quiescent population that we observe at $z\sim3$. In the SAM, we do not find a clear-cut morphological dependence of quenching timescales, but we do predict that the mean stellar ages, cold gas fractions, SMBH masses, and halo masses of transition galaxies tend to be intermediate relative to those of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at $z<3$.
  • We present a study of the relation between galaxy stellar age and mass for 14 members of the $z=1.62$ protocluster IRC 0218, using multiband imaging and HST G102 and G141 grism spectroscopy. Using $UVJ$ colors to separate galaxies into star forming and quiescent populations, we find that at stellar masses $M_* \geq 10^{10.85} M_{\odot}$, the quiescent fraction in the protocluster is $f_Q=1.0^{+0.00}_{-0.37}$, consistent with a $\sim 2\times $ enhancement relative to the field value, $f_Q=0.45^{+0.03}_{-0.03}$. At masses $10^{10.2} M_{\odot} \leq M_* \leq 10^{10.85} M_{\odot}$, $f_Q$ in the cluster is $f_Q=0.40^{+0.20}_{-0.18}$, consistent with the field value of $f_Q=0.28^{+0.02}_{-0.02}$. Using galaxy $D_{n}(4000)$ values derived from the G102 spectroscopy, we find no relation between galaxy stellar age and mass. These results may reflect the impact of merger-driven mass redistribution, which is plausible as this cluster is known to host many dry mergers. Alternately, they may imply that the trend in $f_Q$ in IRC 0218 was imprinted over a short timescale in the protocluster's assembly history. Comparing our results with those of other high-redshift studies and studies of clusters at $z\sim 1$, we determine that our observed relation between $f_Q$ and stellar mass only mildly evolves between $z\sim 1.6$ and $z \sim 1$, and only at stellar masses $M_* \leq 10^{10.85} M_{\odot}$. Both the $z\sim 1$ and $z\sim 1.6$ results are in agreement that the red sequence in dense environments was already populated at high redshift, $z \ge 3$, placing constraints on the mechanism(s) responsible for quenching in dense environments at $z\ge 1.5$
  • We report on SPT-CLJ2011-5228, a giant system of arcs created by a cluster at $z=1.06$. The arc system is notable for the presence of a bright central image. The source is a Lyman Break galaxy at $z_s=2.39$ and the mass enclosed within the 14 arc second radius Einstein ring is $10^{14.2}$ solar masses. We perform a full light profile reconstruction of the lensed images to precisely infer the parameters of the mass distribution. The brightness of the central image demands that the central total density profile of the lens be shallow. By fitting the dark matter as a generalized Navarro-Frenk-White profile---with a free parameter for the inner density slope---we find that the break radius is $270^{+48}_{-76}$ kpc, and that the inner density falls with radius to the power $-0.38\pm0.04$ at 68 percent confidence. Such a shallow profile is in strong tension with our understanding of relaxed cold dark matter halos; dark matter only simulations predict the inner density should fall as $r^{-1}$. The tension can be alleviated if this cluster is in fact a merger; a two halo model can also reconstruct the data, with both clumps (density going as $r^{-0.8}$ and $r^{-1.0}$) much more consistent with predictions from dark matter only simulations. At the resolution of our Dark Energy Survey imaging, we are unable to choose between these two models, but we make predictions for forthcoming Hubble Space Telescope imaging that will decisively distinguish between them.
  • We investigate the environmental quenching of galaxies, especially those with stellar masses (M*)$<10^{9.5} M_\odot$, beyond the local universe. Essentially all local low-mass quenched galaxies (QGs) are believed to live close to massive central galaxies, which is a demonstration of environmental quenching. We use CANDELS data to test {\it whether or not} such a dwarf QG--massive central galaxy connection exists beyond the local universe. To this purpose, we only need a statistically representative, rather than a complete, sample of low-mass galaxies, which enables our study to $z\gtrsim1.5$. For each low-mass galaxy, we measure the projected distance ($d_{proj}$) to its nearest massive neighbor (M*$>10^{10.5} M_\odot$) within a redshift range. At a given redshift and M*, the environmental quenching effect is considered to be observed if the $d_{proj}$ distribution of QGs ($d_{proj}^Q$) is significantly skewed toward lower values than that of star-forming galaxies ($d_{proj}^{SF}$). For galaxies with $10^{8} M_\odot < M* < 10^{10} M_\odot$, such a difference between $d_{proj}^Q$ and $d_{proj}^{SF}$ is detected up to $z\sim1$. Also, about 10\% of the quenched galaxies in our sample are located between two and four virial radii ($R_{Vir}$) of the massive halos. The median projected distance from low-mass QGs to their massive neighbors, $d_{proj}^Q / R_{Vir}$, decreases with satellite M* at $M* \lesssim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$, but increases with satellite M* at $M* \gtrsim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$. This trend suggests a smooth, if any, transition of the quenching timescale around $M* \sim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$ at $0.5<z<1.0$.
  • In the early Universe finding massive galaxies that have stopped forming stars present an observational challenge as their rest-frame ultraviolet emission is negligible and they can only be reliably identified by extremely deep near-infrared surveys. These have revealed the presence of massive, quiescent early-type galaxies appearing in the universe as early as z~2, an epoch 3 Gyr after the Big Bang. Their age and formation processes have now been explained by an improved generation of galaxy formation models where they form rapidly at z~3-4, consistent with the typical masses and ages derived from their observations. Deeper surveys have now reported evidence for populations of massive, quiescent galaxies at even higher redshifts and earlier times, however the evidence for their existence, and redshift, has relied entirely on coarsely sampled photometry. These early massive, quiescent galaxies are not predicted by the latest generation of theoretical models. Here, we report the spectroscopic confirmation of one of these galaxies at redshift z=3.717 with a stellar mass of 1.7$\times$10$^{11}$ M$_\odot$ whose absorption line spectrum shows no current star-formation and which has a derived age of nearly half the age of the Universe at this redshift. The observations demonstrates that the galaxy must have quickly formed its stars within the first billion years of cosmic history in an extreme and short starburst. This ancestral event is similar to those starting to be found by sub-mm wavelength surveys pointing to a possible connection between these two populations. Early formation of such massive systems is likely to require significant revisions to our picture of early galaxy assembly.
  • Using deep multi-wavelength photometry of galaxies from ZFOURGE, we group galaxies at $2.5<z<4.0$ by the shape of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We identify a population of galaxies with excess emission in the $K_s$-band, which corresponds to [OIII]+H$\beta$ emission at $2.95<z<3.65$. This population includes 78% of the bluest galaxies with UV slopes steeper than $\beta = -2$. We de-redshift and scale this photometry to build two composite SEDs, enabling us to measure equivalent widths of these Extreme [OIII]+H$\beta$ Emission Line Galaxies (EELGs) at $z\sim3.5$. We identify 60 galaxies that comprise a composite SED with [OIII]+H$\beta$ rest-frame equivalent width of $803\pm228$\AA\ and another 218 galaxies in a composite SED with equivalent width of $230\pm90$\AA. These EELGs are analogous to the `green peas' found in the SDSS, and are thought to be undergoing their first burst of star formation due to their blue colors ($\beta < -1.6$), young ages ($\log(\rm{age}/yr)\sim7.2$), and low dust attenuation values. Their strong nebular emission lines and compact sizes (typically $\sim1.4$ kpc) are consistent with the properties of the star-forming galaxies possibly responsible for reionizing the universe at $z>6$. Many of the EELGs also exhibit Lyman-$\alpha$ emission. Additionally, we find that many of these sources are clustered in an overdensity in the Chandra Deep Field South, with five spectroscopically confirmed members at $z=3.474 \pm 0.004$. The spatial distribution and photometric redshifts of the ZFOURGE population further confirm the overdensity highlighted by the EELGs.
  • For the first time, we present the size evolution of a mass-complete (log(M*/Msol)>10) sample of star-forming galaxies over redshifts z=1-7, selected from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE). Observed H-band sizes are measured from the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/F160W imaging. Distributions of individual galaxy masses and sizes illustrate that a clear mass-size relation exists up to z~7. At z~7, we find that the average galaxy size from the mass-size relation is more compact at a fixed mass of log(M*/Msol)=10.1, with r_1/2,maj=1.02+/-0.29 kpc, than at lower redshifts. This is consistent with our results from stacking the same CANDELS HST/F160W imaging, when we correct for galaxy position angle alignment. We find that the size evolution of star-forming galaxies is well fit by a power law of the form r_e = 7.07(1 + z)^-0.89 kpc, which is consistent with previous works for normal star-formers at 1<z<4. In order to compare our slope with those derived Lyman break galaxy studies, we correct for different IMFs and methodology and find a slope of -0.97+/-0.02, which is shallower than that reported for the evolution of Lyman break galaxies at z>4 (r_e\propto(1 +z)^-1.2+/-0.06). Therefore, we conclude the Lyman break galaxies likely represent a subset of highly star-forming galaxies that exhibit rapid size growth at z>4.
  • We compare galaxy scaling relations as a function of environment at $z\sim2$ with our ZFIRE survey where we have measured H$\alpha$ fluxes for 90 star-forming galaxies selected from a mass-limited [$\log(M_{\star}/M_{\odot})>9$] sample based on ZFOURGE. The cluster galaxies (37) are part of a confirmed system at z=2.095 and the field galaxies (53) are at $1.9<z<2.4$; all are in the COSMOS legacy field. There is no statistical difference between H$\alpha$-emitting cluster and field populations when comparing their star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass ($M_{\star}$), galaxy size ($r_{eff}$), SFR surface density [$\Sigma$(H$\alpha_{star}$)], and stellar age distributions. The only difference is that at fixed stellar mass, the H$\alpha$-emitting cluster galaxies are $\log(r_{eff})\sim0.1$ larger than in the field. Approximately 19% of the H$\alpha$-emitters in the cluster and 26% in the field are IR-luminous ($L_{IR}>2\times10^{11} L_{\odot}$). Because the LIRGs in our combined sample are $\sim5$ times more massive than the low-IR galaxies, their radii are $\sim70$% larger. To track stellar growth, we separate galaxies into those that lie above, on, and below the H$\alpha$ star-forming main sequence (SFMS) using $\Delta$SFR$(M_{\star})=\pm0.2$ dex. Galaxies above the SFMS (starbursts) tend to have higher H$\alpha$ SFR surface densities and younger light-weighted stellar ages compared to galaxies below the SFMS. Our results indicate that starbursts (+SFMS) in the cluster and field at $z\sim2$ are growing their stellar cores. Lastly, we compare to the (SFR-$M_{\star}$) relation from RHAPSODY cluster simulations and find the predicted slope is nominally consistent with the observations. However, the predicted cluster SFRs tend to be too low by a factor of $\sim2$ which seems to be a common problem for simulations across environment.
  • We perform the first spatially-resolved stellar population study of galaxies in the early universe (z = 3.5 - 6.5), utilizing the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging dataset over the GOODS-S field. We select a sample of 418 bright and extended galaxies at z = 3.5 - 6.5 from a parent sample of ~ 8000 photometric-redshift selected galaxies from Finkelstein et al. (2015). We first examine galaxies at 3.5< z < 4.0 using additional deep K-band survey data from the HAWK-I UDS and GOODS Survey (HUGS) which covers the 4000A break at these redshifts. We measure the stellar mass, star formation rate, and dust extinction for galaxy inner and outer regions via spatially-resolved spectral energy distribution fitting based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. By comparing specific star formation rates (sSFRs) between inner and outer parts of the galaxies we find that the majority of galaxies with the high central mass densities show evidence for a preferentially lower sSFR in their centers than in their outer regions, indicative of reduced sSFRs in their central regions. We also study galaxies at z ~ 5 and 6 (here limited to high spatial resolution in the rest-frame ultraviolet only), finding that they show sSFRs which are generally independent of radial distance from the center of the galaxies. This indicates that stars are formed uniformly at all radii in massive galaxies at z ~ 5 - 6, contrary to massive galaxies at z < 4.
  • The gas accretion and star-formation histories of galaxies like the Milky Way remain an outstanding problem in astrophysics. Observations show that 8 billion years ago, the progenitors to Milky Way-mass galaxies were forming stars 30 times faster than today and predicted to be rich in molecular gas, in contrast with low present-day gas fractions ($<$10%). Here we show detections of molecular gas from the CO(J=3-2) emission (rest-frame 345.8 GHz) in galaxies at redshifts z=1.2-1.3, selected to have the stellar mass and star-formation rate of the progenitors of today's Milky Way-mass galaxies. The CO emission reveals large molecular gas masses, comparable to or exceeding the galaxy stellar masses, and implying most of the baryons are in cold gas, not stars. The galaxies' total luminosities from star formation and CO luminosities yield long gas-consumption timescales. Compared to local spiral galaxies, the star-formation efficiency, estimated from the ratio of total IR luminosity to CO emission,} has remained nearly constant since redshift z=1.2, despite the order of magnitude decrease in gas fraction, consistent with results for other galaxies at this epoch. Therefore the physical processes that determine the rate at which gas cools to form stars in distant galaxies appear to be similar to that in local galaxies.
  • The FourStar galaxy evolution survey (ZFOURGE) is a 45 night legacy program with the FourStar near-infrared camera on Magellan and one of the most sensitive surveys to date. ZFOURGE covers a total of $400\ \mathrm{arcmin}^2$ in cosmic fields CDFS, COSMOS and UDS, overlapping CANDELS. We present photometric catalogs comprising $>70,000$ galaxies, selected from ultradeep $K_s$-band detection images ($25.5-26.5$ AB mag, $5\sigma$, total), and $>80\%$ complete to $K_s<25.3-25.9$ AB. We use 5 near-IR medium-bandwidth filters ($J_1,J_2,J_3,H_s,H_l$) as well as broad-band $K_s$ at $1.05\ - 2.16\ \mu m$ to $25-26$ AB at a seeing of $\sim0.5$". Each field has ancillary imaging in $26-40$ filters at $0.3-8\ \mu m$. We derive photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. Comparing with spectroscopic redshifts indicates a photometric redshift uncertainty $\sigma_z={0.010,0.009}$, and 0.011 in CDFS, COSMOS, and UDS. As spectroscopic samples are often biased towards bright and blue sources, we also inspect the photometric redshift differences between close pairs of galaxies, finding $\sigma_{z,pairs}= 0.01-0.02$ at $1<z<2.5$. We quantify how $\sigma_{z,pairs}$ depends on redshift, magnitude, SED type, and the inclusion of FourStar medium bands. $\sigma_{z,pairs}$ is smallest for bright, blue star-forming samples, while red star-forming galaxies have the worst $\sigma_{z,pairs}$. Including FourStar medium bands reduces $\sigma_{z,pairs}$ by 50\% at $1.5<z<2.5$. We calculate SFRs based on ultraviolet and ultradeep far-IR $Spitzer$/MIPS and Herschel/PACS data. We derive rest-frame $U-V$ and $V-J$ colors, and illustrate how these correlate with specific SFR and dust emission to $z=3.5$. We confirm the existence of quiescent galaxies at $z\sim3$, demonstrating their SFRs are suppressed by $>\times15$.
  • We present galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMFs) at $z=$ 4-8 from a rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) selected sample of $\sim$4500 galaxies, found via photometric redshifts over an area of $\sim$280 arcmin$^2$ in the CANDELS/GOODS fields and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The deepest Spitzer/IRAC data yet-to-date and the relatively large volume allow us to place a better constraint at both the low- and high-mass ends of the GSMFs compared to previous space-based studies from pre-CANDELS observations. Supplemented by a stacking analysis, we find a linear correlation between the rest-frame UV absolute magnitude at 1500 \AA\ ($M_{\rm UV}$) and logarithmic stellar mass ($\log M_*$) that holds for galaxies with $\log(M_*/M_{\odot}) \lesssim 10$. We use simulations to validate our method of measuring the slope of the $\log M_*$-$M_{\rm UV}$ relation, finding that the bias is minimized with a hybrid technique combining photometry of individual bright galaxies with stacked photometry for faint galaxies. The resultant measured slopes do not significantly evolve over $z=$ 4-8, while the normalization of the trend exhibits a weak evolution toward lower masses at higher redshift. We combine the $\log M_*$-$M_{\rm UV}$ distribution with observed rest-frame UV luminosity functions at each redshift to derive the GSMFs, finding that the low-mass-end slope becomes steeper with increasing redshift from $\alpha=-1.55^{+0.08}_{-0.07}$ at $z=4$ to $\alpha=-2.25^{+0.72}_{-0.35}$ at $z=8$. The inferred stellar mass density, when integrated over $M_*=10^8$-$10^{13} M_{\odot}$, increases by a factor of $10^{+30}_{-2}$ between $z=7$ and $z=4$ and is in good agreement with the time integral of the cosmic star formation rate density.
  • Dust attenuation affects nearly all observational aspects of galaxy evolution, yet very little is known about the form of the dust-attenuation law in the distant Universe. Here, we model the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies at z = 1.5--3 from CANDELS with rest-frame UV to near-IR imaging under different assumptions about the dust law, and compare the amount of inferred attenuated light with the observed infrared (IR) luminosities. Some individual galaxies show strong Bayesian evidence in preference of one dust law over another, and this preference agrees with their observed location on the plane of infrared excess (IRX, $L_{\text{TIR}}/L_{\text{UV}}$) and UV slope ($\beta$). We generalize the shape of the dust law with an empirical model, $A_{\lambda,\delta}=E(B-V)\ k_\lambda\ (\lambda/\lambda_V)^\delta$ where $k_\lambda$ is the dust law of Calzetti et al. (2000), and show that there exists a correlation between the color excess ${E(B-V)}$ and tilt $\delta$ with ${\delta=(0.62\pm0.05)\log(E(B-V))}$+ ${(0.26~\pm~0.02)}$. Galaxies with high color excess have a shallower, starburst-like law, and those with low color excess have a steeper, SMC-like law. Surprisingly, the galaxies in our sample show no correlation between the shape of the dust law and stellar mass, star-formation rate, or $\beta$. The change in the dust law with color excess is consistent with a model where attenuation is caused by by scattering, a mixed star-dust geometry, and/or trends with stellar population age, metallicity, and dust grain size. This rest-frame UV-to-near-IR method shows potential to constrain the dust law at even higher ($z>3$) redshifts.
  • We present post-cryogenic Spitzer imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 micron with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) of the Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey. SHELA covers $\sim$deg$^2$ of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey "Stripe 82" region, and falls within the footprints of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and the Dark Energy Survey. The HETDEX blind R $\sim$ 800 spectroscopy will produce $\sim$ 200,000 redshifts from the Lyman-$\alpha$ emission for galaxies in the range 1.9 < z < 3.5, and an additional $\sim$200,000 redshifts from the [OII] emission for galaxies at z < 0.5. When combined with deep ugriz images from the Dark Energy Camera, K-band images from NEWFIRM, and other ancillary data, the IRAC photometry from Spitzer will enable a broad range of scientific studies of the relationship between structure formation, galaxy stellar mass, halo mass, AGN, and environment over a co-moving volume of $\sim$0.5 Gpc$^3$ at 1.9 < z < 3.5. Here, we discuss the properties of the SHELA IRAC dataset, including the data acquisition, reduction, validation, and source catalogs. Our tests show the images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 $\mu$Jy at both 3.6 and 4.5 micron (1$\sigma$, for R=2 arcsec circular apertures). As a demonstration of science, we present IRAC number counts, examples of highly temporally variable sources, and galaxy surface density profiles of rich galaxy clusters. In the spirit of Spitzer Exploratory programs we provide all images and catalogs as part of the publication.
  • Important but rare and subtle processes driving galaxy morphology and star-formation may be missed by traditional spiral, elliptical, irregular or S\'ersic bulge/disk classifications. To overcome this limitation, we use a principal component analysis of non-parametric morphological indicators (concentration, asymmetry, Gini coefficient, $M_{20}$, multi-mode, intensity and deviation) measured at rest-frame $B$-band (corresponding to HST/WFC3 F125W at 1.4 $< z <$ 2) to trace the natural distribution of massive ($>10^{10} M_{\odot}$) galaxy morphologies. Principal component analysis (PCA) quantifies the correlations between these morphological indicators and determines the relative importance of each. The first three principal components (PCs) capture $\sim$75 per cent of the variance inherent to our sample. We interpret the first principal component (PC) as bulge strength, the second PC as dominated by concentration and the third PC as dominated by asymmetry. Both PC1 and PC2 correlate with the visual appearance of a central bulge and predict galaxy quiescence. PC1 is a better predictor of quenching than stellar mass, as as good as other structural indicators (S\'ersic-n or compactness). We divide the PCA results into groups using an agglomerative hierarchical clustering method. Unlike S\'ersic, this classification scheme separates compact galaxies from larger, smooth proto-elliptical systems, and star-forming disk-dominated clumpy galaxies from star-forming bulge-dominated asymmetric galaxies. Distinguishing between these galaxy structural types in a quantitative manner is an important step towards understanding the connections between morphology, galaxy assembly and star-formation.
  • We build a set of composite galaxy SEDs by de-redshifting and scaling multi-wavelength photometry from galaxies in the ZFOURGE survey, covering the CDFS, COSMOS, and UDS fields. From a sample of ~4000 K_s-band selected galaxies, we define 38 composite galaxy SEDs that yield continuous low-resolution spectra (R~45) over the rest-frame range 0.1-4 um. Additionally, we include far infrared photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory to characterize the infrared properties of our diverse set of composite SEDs. From these composite SEDs we analyze the rest-frame UVJ colors, as well as the ratio of IR to UV light (IRX) and the UV slope ($\beta$) in the IRX$-\beta$ dust relation at 1<z<3. Blue star-forming composite SEDs show IRX and $\beta$ values consistent with local relations; dusty star-forming galaxies have considerable scatter, as found for local IR bright sources, but on average appear bluer than expected for their IR fluxes. We measure a tight linear relation between rest-frame UVJ colors and dust attenuation for star-forming composites, providing a direct method for estimating dust content from either (U-V) or (V-J) rest-frame colors for star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts.
  • We investigate active galactic nuclei (AGN) candidates within the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) to determine the impact they have on star-formation in their host galaxies. We first identify a population of radio, X-ray, and infrared-selected AGN by cross-matching the deep $K_{s}$-band imaging of ZFOURGE with overlapping multi-wavelength data. From this, we construct a mass-complete (log(M$_{*}$/M$_{\odot}$) $\ge$ 9.75), AGN luminosity limited sample of 235 AGN hosts over z = 0.2 - 3.2. We compare the rest-frame U - V versus V - J (UVJ) colours and specific star-formation rates (sSFRs) of the AGN hosts to a mass-matched control sample of inactive (non-AGN) galaxies. UVJ diagnostics reveal AGN tend to be hosted in a lower fraction of quiescent galaxies and a higher fraction of dusty galaxies than the control sample. Using 160{\mu}m Herschel PACS data, we find the mean specific star-formation rate of AGN hosts to be elevated by 0.34$\pm$0.07 dex with respect to the control sample across all redshifts. This offset is primarily driven by infrared-selected AGN, where the mean sSFR is found to be elevated by as much as a factor of ~5. The remaining population, comprised predominantly of X-ray AGN hosts, is found mostly consistent with inactive galaxies, exhibiting only a marginal elevation. We discuss scenarios that may explain these findings and postulate that AGN are less likely to be a dominant mechanism for moderating galaxy growth via quenching than has previously been suggested.
  • We calibrate the integrated luminosity from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features at 6.2\micron, 7.7\micron\ and 11.3\micron\ in galaxies as a measure of the star-formation rate (SFR). These features are strong (containing as much as 5-10\% of the total infrared luminosity) and suffer minimal extinction. Our calibration uses \spitzer\ Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) measurements of 105 galaxies at $0 < z < 0.4$, infrared (IR) luminosities of $10^9 - 10^{12} \lsol$, combined with other well-calibrated SFR indicators. The PAH luminosity correlates linearly with the SFR as measured by the extinction-corrected \ha\ luminosity over the range of luminosities in our calibration sample. The scatter is 0.14 dex comparable to that between SFRs derived from the \paa\ and extinction-corrected \ha\ emission lines, implying the PAH features may be as accurate a SFR indicator as hydrogen recombination lines. The PAH SFR relation depends on gas-phase metallicity, for which we supply an empirical correction for galaxies with $0.2 < \mathrm{Z} \lsim 0.7$~\zsol. We present a case study in advance of the \textit{James Webb Space Telescope} (\jwst), which will be capable of measuring SFRs from PAHs in distant galaxies at the peak of the SFR density in the universe ($z\sim2$) with SFRs as low as $\sim$~10~\sfrunits. We use \spitzer/IRS observations of the PAH features and \paa\ emission plus \ha\ measurements in lensed star-forming galaxies at $1 < z < 3$ to demonstrate the ability of the PAHs to derive accurate SFRs. We also demonstrate that because the PAH features dominate the mid-IR fluxes, broad-band mid-IR photometric measurements from \jwst\ will trace both the SFR and provide a way to exclude galaxies dominated by an AGN.
  • Recent observations have shown that the characteristic luminosity of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function does not significantly evolve at 4 < z < 7 and is approximately M*_UV ~ -21. We investigate this apparent non-evolution by examining a sample of 178 bright, M_UV < -21 galaxies at z=4 to 7, analyzing their stellar populations and host halo masses. Including deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging to constrain the rest-frame optical light, we find that M*_UV galaxies at z=4-7 have similar stellar masses of log(M/Msol)=9.6-9.9 and are thus relatively massive for these high redshifts. However, bright galaxies at z=4-7 are less massive and have younger inferred ages than similarly bright galaxies at z=2-3, even though the two populations have similar star formation rates and levels of dust attenuation. We match the abundances of these bright z=4-7 galaxies to halo mass functions from the Bolshoi Lambda-CDM simulation to estimate the halo masses. We find that the typical halo masses in ~M*_UV galaxies decrease from log(M_h/Msol)=11.9 at z=4 to log(M_h/Msol)=11.4 at z=7. Thus, although we are studying galaxies at a similar mass across multiple redshifts, these galaxies live in lower mass halos at higher redshift. The stellar baryon fraction in units of the cosmic mean Omega_b/Omega_m rises from 5.1% at z=4 to 11.7% at z=7; this evolution is significant at the ~3-sigma level. This rise does not agree with simple expectations of how galaxies grow, and implies that some effect, perhaps a diminishing efficiency of feedback, is allowing a higher fraction of available baryons to be converted into stars at high redshifts.