• High-dimensional data in many areas such as computer vision and machine learning tasks brings in computational and analytical difficulty. Feature selection which selects a subset from observed features is a widely used approach for improving performance and effectiveness of machine learning models with high-dimensional data. In this paper, we propose a novel AutoEncoder Feature Selector (AEFS) for unsupervised feature selection which combines autoencoder regression and group lasso tasks. Compared to traditional feature selection methods, AEFS can select the most important features by excavating both linear and nonlinear information among features, which is more flexible than the conventional self-representation method for unsupervised feature selection with only linear assumptions. Experimental results on benchmark dataset show that the proposed method is superior to the state-of-the-art method.
  • For a quantum system subject to external parameters, the Berry phase is an intra-level property, which is gauge invariant module $2\pi$ for a closed loop in the parameter space and generally is non-quantized. In contrast, we define a inter-band character $\Theta$ for a closed loop, which is gauge invariant and quantized as integer values. It is a quantum mechanical analogy of the Euler character based on the Gauss-Bonnet theorem for a manifold with a boundary. The role of the Gaussian curvature is mimicked by the difference between the Berry curvatures of the two levels, and the counterpart of the geodesic curvature is the quantum geometric potential which was proposed to improve the quantum adiabatic condition. This quantized inter-band character is also generalized to quantum degenerate systems.
  • Compressing convolutional neural networks (CNNs) is essential for transferring the success of CNNs to a wide variety of applications to mobile devices. In contrast to directly recognizing subtle weights or filters as redundant in a given CNN, this paper presents an evolutionary method to automatically eliminate redundant convolution filters. We represent each compressed network as a binary individual of specific fitness. Then, the population is upgraded at each evolutionary iteration using genetic operations. As a result, an extremely compact CNN is generated using the fittest individual. In this approach, either large or small convolution filters can be redundant, and filters in the compressed network are more distinct. In addition, since the number of filters in each convolutional layer is reduced, the number of filter channels and the size of feature maps are also decreased, naturally improving both the compression and speed-up ratios. Experiments on benchmark deep CNN models suggest the superiority of the proposed algorithm over the state-of-the-art compression methods.
  • The computational complexity of multicut-like problems may vary significantly depending on whether the terminals are fixed or not. In this work we present a comprehensive study of this phenomenon in two types of cut problems in directed graphs: double cut and bicut. 1. The fixed-terminal edge-weighted double cut is known to be solvable efficiently. We show a tight approximability factor of $2$ for the fixed-terminal node-weighted double cut. We show that the global node-weighted double cut cannot be approximated to a factor smaller than $3/2$ under the Unique Games Conjecture (UGC). 2. The fixed-terminal edge-weighted bicut is known to have a tight approximability factor of $2$. We show that the global edge-weighted bicut is approximable to a factor strictly better than $2$, and that the global node-weighted bicut cannot be approximated to a factor smaller than $3/2$ under UGC. 3. In relation to these investigations, we also prove two results on undirected graphs which are of independent interest. First, we show NP-completeness and a tight inapproximability bound of $4/3$ for the node-weighted $3$-cut problem. Second, we show that for constant $k$, there exists an efficient algorithm to solve the minimum $\{s,t\}$-separating $k$-cut problem. Our techniques for the algorithms are combinatorial, based on LPs and based on enumeration of approximate min-cuts. Our hardness results are based on combinatorial reductions and integrality gap instances.
  • We study algorithmic and structural aspects of connectivity in hypergraphs. Given a hypergraph $H=(V,E)$ with $n = |V|$, $m = |E|$ and $p = \sum_{e \in E} |e|$ the best known algorithm to compute a global minimum cut in $H$ runs in time $O(np)$ for the uncapacitated case and in $O(np + n^2 \log n)$ time for the capacitated case. We show the following new results. 1. Given an uncapacitated hypergraph $H$ and an integer $k$ we describe an algorithm that runs in $O(p)$ time to find a subhypergraph $H'$ with sum of degrees $O(kn)$ that preserves all edge-connectivities up to $k$ (a $k$-sparsifier). This generalizes the corresponding result of Nagamochi and Ibaraki from graphs to hypergraphs. Using this sparsification we obtain an $O(p + \lambda n^2)$ time algorithm for computing a global minimum cut of $H$ where $\lambda$ is the minimum cut value. 2. We generalize Matula's argument for graphs to hypergraphs and obtain a $(2+\epsilon)$-approximation to the global minimum cut in a capacitated hypergraph in $O(\frac{1}{\epsilon} (p \log n + n \log^2 n))$ time. 3. We show that a hypercactus representation of all the global minimum cuts of a capacitated hypergraph can be computed in $O(np + n^2 \log n)$ time and $O(p)$ space. We utilize vertex ordering based ideas to obtain our results. Unlike graphs we observe that there are several different orderings for hypergraphs which yield different insights.
  • When we say "I know why he was late", we know not only the fact that he was late, but also an explanation of this fact. We propose a logical framework of "knowing why" inspired by the existing formal studies on why-questions, scientific explanation, and justification logic. We introduce the Ky_i operator into the language of epistemic logic to express "agent i knows why phi" and propose a Kripke-style semantics of such expressions in terms of knowing an explanation of phi. We obtain two sound and complete axiomatizations w.r.t. two different model classes depending on different assumptions about introspection.
  • Let $H=(V,E)$ be an edge-weighted hypergraph of rank $r$. Kogan and Krauthgamer extended Bencz\'{u}r and Karger's random sampling scheme for cut sparsification from graphs to hypergraphs. The sampling requires an algorithm for computing the approximate strengths of edges. In this note we extend the algorithm for graphs to hypergraphs and describe a near-linear time algorithm to compute approximate strengths of edges; we build on a sparsification result for hypergraphs from our recent work. Combined with prior results we obtain faster algorithms for finding $(1+\epsilon)$-approximate mincuts when the rank of the hypergraph is small.
  • This paper presents privileged multi-label learning (PrML) to explore and exploit the relationship between labels in multi-label learning problems. We suggest that for each individual label, it cannot only be implicitly connected with other labels via the low-rank constraint over label predictors, but also its performance on examples can receive the explicit comments from other labels together acting as an \emph{Oracle teacher}. We generate privileged label feature for each example and its individual label, and then integrate it into the framework of low-rank based multi-label learning. The proposed algorithm can therefore comprehensively explore and exploit label relationships by inheriting all the merits of privileged information and low-rank constraints. We show that PrML can be efficiently solved by dual coordinate descent algorithm using iterative optimization strategy with cheap updates. Experiments on benchmark datasets show that through privileged label features, the performance can be significantly improved and PrML is superior to several competing methods in most cases.
  • Given a multiset $S$ of $n$ positive integers and a target integer $t$, the subset sum problem is to decide if there is a subset of $S$ that sums up to $t$. We present a new divide-and-conquer algorithm that computes all the realizable subset sums up to an integer $u$ in $\widetilde{O}\!\left(\min\{\sqrt{n}u,u^{4/3},\sigma\}\right)$, where $\sigma$ is the sum of all elements in $S$ and $\widetilde{O}$ hides polylogarithmic factors. This result improves upon the standard dynamic programming algorithm that runs in $O(nu)$ time. To the best of our knowledge, the new algorithm is the fastest general algorithm for this problem. We also present a modified algorithm for cyclic groups, which computes all the realizable subset sums within the group in $\widetilde{O}\!\left(\min\{\sqrt{n}m,m^{5/4}\}\right)$ time, where $m$ is the order of the group.
  • In this paper, we consider an open-loop, finite-time, optimal control problem of attaining a specific desired current profile during the ramp-up phase by finding the best open-loop actuator input trajectories. Average density, total power, and plasma current are used as control actuators to manipulate the profile shape in tokamak plasmas. Based on the control parameterization method, we propose a numerical solution procedure directly to solve the original PDE-constrained optimization problem using gradient-based optimization techniques such as sequential quadratic programming (SQP). This paper is aimed at proposing an effective framework for the solution of PDE-constrained optimization problem in tokamak plasmas. A more user-friendly and efficient graphical user interface (GUI) is designed in MATLAB and the numerical simulation results are verified to demonstrate its applicability. In addition, the proposed framework of combining existing PDE and numerical optimization solvers to solve PDE-constrained optimization problem has the prospective to target challenge advanced control problems arising in more general chemical engineering processes.
  • An underlying assumption in conventional multi-view learning algorithms is that all views can be simultaneously accessed. However, due to various factors when collecting and pre-processing data from different views, the streaming view setting, in which views arrive in a streaming manner, is becoming more common. By assuming that the subspaces of a multi-view model trained over past views are stable, here we fine tune their combination weights such that the well-trained multi-view model is compatible with new views. This largely overcomes the burden of learning new view functions and updating past view functions. We theoretically examine convergence issues and the influence of streaming views in the proposed algorithm. Experimental results on real-world datasets suggest that studying the streaming views problem in multi-view learning is significant and that the proposed algorithm can effectively handle streaming views in different applications.
  • It is challenging to handle a large volume of labels in multi-label learning. However, existing approaches explicitly or implicitly assume that all the labels in the learning process are given, which could be easily violated in changing environments. In this paper, we define and study streaming label learning (SLL), i.e., labels are arrived on the fly, to model newly arrived labels with the help of the knowledge learned from past labels. The core of SLL is to explore and exploit the relationships between new labels and past labels and then inherit the relationship into hypotheses of labels to boost the performance of new classifiers. In specific, we use the label self-representation to model the label relationship, and SLL will be divided into two steps: a regression problem and a empirical risk minimization (ERM) problem. Both problems are simple and can be efficiently solved. We further show that SLL can generate a tighter generalization error bound for new labels than the general ERM framework with trace norm or Frobenius norm regularization. Finally, we implement extensive experiments on various benchmark datasets to validate the new setting. And results show that SLL can effectively handle the constantly emerging new labels and provides excellent classification performance.
  • Here we study the extreme visual recovery problem, in which over 90\% of pixel values in a given image are missing. Existing low rank-based algorithms are only effective for recovering data with at most 90\% missing values. Thus, we exploit visual data's smoothness property to help solve this challenging extreme visual recovery problem. Based on the Discrete Cosine Transformation (DCT), we propose a novel DCT norm that involves all pixels and produces smooth estimations in any view. Our theoretical analysis shows that the total variation (TV) norm, which only achieves local smoothness, is a special case of the proposed DCT norm. We also develop a new visual recovery algorithm by minimizing the DCT and nuclear norms to achieve a more visually pleasing estimation. Experimental results on a benchmark image dataset demonstrate that the proposed approach is superior to state-of-the-art methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio and structural similarity.
  • We quantitatively illustrate the fundamental limit that exciton-exciton annihilation (EEA) may impose to the light emission of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) materials. The EEA in TMDC monolayers shows dependence on the interaction with substrates as its rate increases from 0.1 cm2/s (0.05 cm2/s) to 0.3 cm2/s (0.1 cm2/s) with the substrates removed for WS2 (MoS2) monolayers. It turns to be the major pathway of exciton decay and dominates the luminescence efficiency when the exciton density is beyond 1010 cm-2 in suspended monolayers or 1011 cm-2 in supported monolayers. This sets an upper limit on the density of injected charges in light emission devices for the realization of optimal luminescence efficiency. The strong EEA rate also dictates the pumping threshold for population inversion in the monolayers to be 12-18 MW/cm2 (optically) or 2.5-4x105 A/cm2 (electrically).
  • This paper proposes a new gradient-based optimization approach for designing optimal feedback kernels for parabolic distributed parameter systems with boundary control. Unlike traditional kernel optimization methods for parabolic systems, our new method does not require solving non-standard Riccati-type or Klein-Gorden-type partial differential equations (PDEs). Instead, the feedback kernel is parameterized as a second-order polynomial whose coefficients are decision variables to be tuned via gradient-based dynamic optimization, where the gradient of the system cost functional (which penalizes both kernel and output magnitude) is computed by solving a so-called costate PDE instandard form. Special constraints are imposed on the kernel coefficients to ensure that, under mild conditions, the optimized kernel yields closed-loop stability. Numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.
  • This paper described a measurement of accelerator neutron radiation field at a transport beam line of Beijing-TBF. The experiment place was be selected around a Faraday Cup with a graphite target impacted by electron beam at 2.5GeV. First of all, we simulated the neutron radiation experiment by FLUKA. Secondly, we chose six appropriate ERNMS according to their neutron fluence response function to measure the neutron count rate. Then the U_M_G package program was be utilized to unfolding experiment data. Finally, we drew a comparison between the unfolding with the simulation spectrum and made an analysis about the result.
  • This paper proposes a new time-scaling approach for computational optimal control of a distributed parameter system governed by the Saint-Venant PDEs. We propose the time-scaling approach, which can change a uniform time partition to a nonuniform one. We also derive the gradient formulas by using the variational method. Then the method of lines (MOL) is applied to compute the Saint-Venant PDEs after implementing the time-scaling transformation and the associate costate PDEs. Finally, we compare the optimization results using the proposed time-scaling approach with the one not using it. The simulation result demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed time-scaling method.
  • Nowadays, the size of the Internet is experiencing rapid growth. As of December 2014, the number of global Internet websites has more than 1 billion and all kinds of information resources are integrated together on the Internet, however,the search engine is to be a necessary tool for all users to retrieve useful information from vast amounts of web data. Generally speaking, a complete search engine includes the crawler system, index building systems, sorting systems and retrieval system. At present there are many open source implementation of search engine, such as lucene, solr, katta, elasticsearch, solandra and so on. The crawler system and sorting system is indispensable for any kind of search engine and in order to guarantee its efficiency, the former needs to update crawled vast amounts of data and the latter requires real-time to build index on newly crawled web pages and calculae its corresponding PageRank value. It is unlikely to accomplish such huge computation tasks depending on a single hardware implementation of the crawler system and sorting system,from which aspect, the distributed cluster technology is brought to the front. In this paper, we use the hadoop Map - Reduce computing framework to implement a distributed crawler system, and use the GraphLite, a distributed synchronous graph-computing framework, to achieve the real-time computation in getting the PageRank value of the new crawled web page.
  • Street parking spots for automobiles are a scarce commodity in most urban environments. The heterogeneity of car sizes makes it inefficient to rigidly define fixed-sized spots. Instead, unmarked streets in cities like New York leave placement decisions to individual drivers, who have no direct incentive to maximize street utilization. In this paper, we explore the effectiveness of two different behavioral interventions designed to encourage better parking, namely (1) educational campaigns to encourage parkers to "kiss the bumper" and reduce the distance between themselves and their neighbors, or (2) painting appropriately-spaced markings on the street and urging drivers to "hit the line". Through analysis and simulation, we establish that the greatest densities are achieved when lines are painted to create spots roughly twice the length of average-sized cars. Kiss-the-bumper campaigns are in principle more effective than hit-the-line for equal degrees of compliance, although we believe that the visual cues of painted lines induce better parking behavior.
  • We study techniques for solving the Maximum Satisfiability problem (MaxSAT). Our focus is on variables of degree 4. We identify cases for degree-4 variables and show how the resolution principle and the kernelization techniques can be nicely integrated to achieve more efficient algorithms for the MaxSAT problem. As a result, we present an algorithm of time $O^*(1.3248^k)$ for the MaxSAT problem, improving the previous best upper bound $O^*(1.358^k)$ by Ivan Bliznets and Alexander.
  • Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) has proven an effective tool for two-view dimension reduction due to its profound theoretical foundation and success in practical applications. In respect of multi-view learning, however, it is limited by its capability of only handling data represented by two-view features, while in many real-world applications, the number of views is frequently many more. Although the ad hoc way of simultaneously exploring all possible pairs of features can numerically deal with multi-view data, it ignores the high order statistics (correlation information) which can only be discovered by simultaneously exploring all features. Therefore, in this work, we develop tensor CCA (TCCA) which straightforwardly yet naturally generalizes CCA to handle the data of an arbitrary number of views by analyzing the covariance tensor of the different views. TCCA aims to directly maximize the canonical correlation of multiple (more than two) views. Crucially, we prove that the multi-view canonical correlation maximization problem is equivalent to finding the best rank-1 approximation of the data covariance tensor, which can be solved efficiently using the well-known alternating least squares (ALS) algorithm. As a consequence, the high order correlation information contained in the different views is explored and thus a more reliable common subspace shared by all features can be obtained. In addition, a non-linear extension of TCCA is presented. Experiments on various challenge tasks, including large scale biometric structure prediction, internet advertisement classification and web image annotation, demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.
  • This paper considers a new bi-objective optimization formulation for robust RGB-D visual odometry. We investigate two methods for solving the proposed bi-objective optimization problem: the weighted sum method (in which the objective functions are combined into a single objective function) and the bounded objective method (in which one of the objective functions is optimized and the value of the other objective function is bounded via a constraint). Our experimental results for the open source TUM RGB-D dataset show that the new bi-objective optimization formulation is superior to several existing RGB-D odometry methods. In particular, the new formulation yields more accurate motion estimates and is more robust when textural or structural features in the image sequence are lacking.
  • When fluid flow in a pipeline is suddenly halted, a pressure surge or wave is created within the pipeline. This phenomenon, called water hammer, can cause major damage to pipelines, including pipeline ruptures. In this paper, we model the problem of mitigating water hammer during valve closure by an optimal boundary control problem involving a nonlinear hyperbolic PDE system that describes the fluid flow along the pipeline. The control variable in this system represents the valve boundary actuation implemented at the pipeline terminus. To solve the boundary control problem, we first use {the method of lines} to obtain a finite-dimensional ODE model based on the original PDE system. Then, for the boundary control design, we apply the control parameterization method to obtain an approximate optimal parameter selection problem that can be solved using nonlinear optimization techniques such as Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP). We conclude the paper with simulation results demonstrating the capability of optimal boundary control to significantly reduce flow fluctuation.
  • We analyze the local Rademacher complexity of empirical risk minimization (ERM)-based multi-label learning algorithms, and in doing so propose a new algorithm for multi-label learning. Rather than using the trace norm to regularize the multi-label predictor, we instead minimize the tail sum of the singular values of the predictor in multi-label learning. Benefiting from the use of the local Rademacher complexity, our algorithm, therefore, has a sharper generalization error bound and a faster convergence rate. Compared to methods that minimize over all singular values, concentrating on the tail singular values results in better recovery of the low-rank structure of the multi-label predictor, which plays an import role in exploiting label correlations. We propose a new conditional singular value thresholding algorithm to solve the resulting objective function. Empirical studies on real-world datasets validate our theoretical results and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.
  • A closed curve in the plane is weakly simple if it is the limit (in the Fr\'echet metric) of a sequence of simple closed curves. We describe an algorithm to determine whether a closed walk of length n in a simple plane graph is weakly simple in O(n log n) time, improving an earlier O(n^3)-time algorithm of Cortese et al. [Discrete Math. 2009]. As an immediate corollary, we obtain the first efficient algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary n-vertex polygon is weakly simple; our algorithm runs in O(n^2 log n) time. We also describe algorithms that detect weak simplicity in O(n log n) time for two interesting classes of polygons. Finally, we discuss subtle errors in several previously published definitions of weak simplicity.