• K2-55b is a Neptune-sized planet orbiting a K7 dwarf with a radius of $0.715^{+0.043}_{-0.040} R_\odot$, a mass of $0.688\pm0.069 M_\odot$, and an effective temperature of $4300^{+107}_{-100}$ K. Having characterized the host star using near-infrared spectra obtained at IRTF/SpeX, we observed a transit of K2-55b with Spitzer/IRAC and confirmed the accuracy of the original K2 ephemeris for future follow-up transit observations. Performing a joint fit to the Spitzer/IRAC and K2 photometry, we found a planet radius of $4.43^{+0.29}_{-0.32} R_\oplus$, an orbital period of $2.8492725_{- 6.6\times10^{-6}}^{+7 \times 10^{-6}}$ days, and an equilibrium temperature of roughly 900K. We then measured the planet mass by acquiring twelve radial velocity (RV) measurements of the system using HIRES on the 10-m Keck I Telescope. Our RV data set precisely constrains the mass of K2-55b to $44.0\pm 5.3 M_\oplus$, indicating that K2-55b has a bulk density of $2.8_{-0.6}^{+0.7}$ g cm$^{-3}$ and can be modeled as a rocky planet capped by a modest H/He envelope ($M_{\rm envelope} = 12\pm3\% M_p$). K2-55b is denser than most similarly sized planets, raising the question of whether the high planetary bulk density of K2-55b could be attributed to the high metallicity of K2-55. The absence of a substantial volatile envelope despite the large mass of K2-55b poses a challenge to current theories of gas giant formation. We posit that K2-55b may have escaped runaway accretion by migration, late formation, or inefficient core accretion or that K2-55b was stripped of its envelope by a late giant impact.
  • We present a catalog of interesting targets recently identified using data from Campaign 16 of the K2 mission. Our catalog includes 32 high-quality planet candidates (showing no signs of being non- planetary in nature), 54 more ambiguous events that may be either planets or false positives, 169 eclipsing binaries, and 217 other regularly periodic variable sources. We have released light curves for all targets in C16, and have also released system parameters and transit vetting plots for all interesting candidates identified in this paper. Of particular interest is a candidate planet orbiting the bright F dwarf HD 73344 (V = 6.9, K = 5.6) with an orbital period of 15 days. If confirmed, this object would correspond to a $\sim2.6 R_{\oplus}$ planet and would likely be a favorable target for radial velocity characterization. Campaign 16 is one of just two K2 campaigns observed so far in "forward-facing" mode, which enables immediate follow-up observations from the ground. This paper is intended as a rapid release of planet candidates, eclipsing binaries and other interesting periodic variables to maximize the scientific yield of this campaign, and as a test run for the upcoming TESS mission, whose frequent data releases call for similarly rapid candidate identification and efficient follow-up.
  • The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will revolutionize our understanding of exoplanets with transit spectroscopy of a wide range of mature planets close to their host stars ($<$2 AU) and with coronagraphic imaging and spectroscopy of young objects located further out ($>$10 AU). The census of exoplanets has revealed an enormous variety of planets orbiting stars of all ages and spectral types. With TESS adding to this census with its all-sky survey of the closest, brightest stars, the challenge of the coming decade will be to move from demography to physical characterization. This white paper discusses the wide variety of exoplanet opportunities enabled by JWST's sensitivity and stability, its high angular resolution, and its suite of powerful instruments. JWST observations will advance our understanding of the atmospheres of young to mature planets and will provide new insights into planet formation.
  • We present 151 planet candidates orbiting 141 stars from K2 campaigns 5-8 (C5-C8), identified through a systematic search of K2 photometry. In addition, we identify 16 targets as likely eclipsing binaries, based on their light curve morphology. We obtained follow-up optical spectra of 105/141 candidate host stars and 8/16 eclipsing binaries to improve stellar properties and to identify spectroscopic binaries. Importantly, spectroscopy enables measurements of host star radii with $\approx$10% precision, compared to $\approx$40% precision when only broadband photometry is available. The improved stellar radii enable improved planet radii. Our curated catalog of planet candidates provides a starting point for future efforts to confirm and characterize K2 discoveries.
  • The masses, atmospheric makeups, spin-orbit alignments, and system architectures of extrasolar planets can be best studied when the planets orbit bright stars. We report the discovery of three bodies orbiting HD 106315, a bright (V = 8.97 mag) F5 dwarf targeted by our K2 survey for transiting exoplanets. Two small, transiting planets have radii of 2.23 (+0.30/-0.25) R_Earth and 3.95 (+0.42/-0.39) R_Earth and orbital periods of 9.55 d and 21.06 d, respectively. A radial velocity (RV) trend of 0.3 +/- 0.1 m/s/d indicates the likely presence of a third body orbiting HD 106315 with period >160 d and mass >45 M_Earth. Transits of this object would have depths of >0.1% and are definitively ruled out. Though the star has v sin i = 13.2 km/s, it exhibits short-timescale RV variability of just 6.4 m/s, and so is a good target for RV measurements of the mass and density of the inner two planets and the outer object's orbit and mass. Furthermore, the combination of RV noise and moderate v sin i makes HD 106315 a valuable laboratory for studying the spin-orbit alignment of small planets through the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Space-based atmospheric characterization of the two transiting planets via transit and eclipse spectroscopy should also be feasible. This discovery demonstrates again the power of K2 to find compelling exoplanets worthy of future study.
  • The NASA K2 mission uses photometry to find planets transiting stars of various types. M dwarfs are of high interest since they host more short period planets than any other type of main sequence stars and transiting planets around M dwarfs have deeper transits compared to other main sequence stars. In this paper, we present stellar parameters from K and M dwarfs hosting transiting planet candidates discovered by our team. Using the SOFI spectrograph on the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope, we obtained R ~ 1000 J-, H-, and K-band (0.95 - 2.52 microns) spectra of 34 late-type K2 planet and candidate planet host systems and 12 bright K4-M5 dwarfs with interferometrically measured radii and effective temperatures. Out of our 34 late-type K2 targets, we identify 27 of these stars as M dwarfs. We measure equivalent widths of spectral features, derive calibration relations using stars with interferometric measurements, and estimate stellar radii, effective temperatures, masses, and luminosities for the K2 planet hosts. Our calibrations provide radii and temperatures with median uncertainties of 0.059 R_sun (16.09%) and 160 K (4.33%), respectively. We then reassess the radii and equilibrium temperatures of known and candidate planets based on our spectroscopically derived stellar parameters. Since a planet's radius and equilibrium temperature depends on the parameters of its host star, our study provides more precise planetary parameters for planets and candidates orbiting late-type stars observed with K2. We find a median planet radius and an equilibrium temperature of approximately 3R_earth and 500 K, with several systems (K2-18b and K2-72e) receiving near-Earth like levels of incident irradiation.
  • We report precise radial velocity (RV) measurements of WASP-47, a G star that hosts three transiting planets in close proximity (a hot Jupiter, a super-Earth and a Neptune-sized planet) and a non-transiting planet at 1.4 AU. Through a joint analysis of previously published RVs and our own Keck-HIRES RVs, we significantly improve the planet mass and bulk density measurements. For the super-Earth WASP-47e ($P$ = 0.79 days), we measure a mass of 9.11 $\pm$ 1.17 $M_\oplus$, and a bulk density of 7.63 $\pm$ 1.90 g cm$^{-3}$, consistent with a rocky composition. For the hot Jupiter WASP-47b ($P$ = 4.2 days), we measure a mass of 356 $\pm$ 12 $M_\oplus$ (1.12 $\pm$ 0.04 $M_\rm{Jup}$) and constrain its eccentricity to $<0.021$ at 3-$\sigma$ confidence. For the Neptune-size planet WASP-47d ($P$ = 9.0 days), we measure a mass of 12.75 $\pm$ 2.70 $M_\oplus$, and a bulk density of 1.36 $\pm$ 0.42 g cm$^{-3}$, suggesting it has a thick H/He envelope. For the outer non-transiting planet, we measure a minimum mass of 411 $\pm$ 18 $M_\oplus$ (1.29 $\pm$ 0.06 $M_\rm{Jup}$), an orbital period of 595.7 $\pm$ 5.0 days, and an orbital eccentricity of 0.27 $\pm$ 0.04. Our new measurements are consistent with but 2$-$4$\times$ more precise than previous mass measurements.
  • We present a study on the effect of undetected stellar companions on the derived planetary radii for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs). The current production of the KOI list assumes that the each KOI is a single star. Not accounting for stellar multiplicity statistically biases the planets towards smaller radii. The bias towards smaller radii depends on the properties of the companion stars and whether the planets orbit the primary or the companion stars. Defining a planetary radius correction factor $X_R$, we find that if the KOIs are assumed to be single, then, {\it on average}, the planetary radii may be underestimated by a factor of $\langle X_R \rangle \approx 1.5$. If typical radial velocity and high resolution imaging observations are performed and no companions are detected, this factor reduces to $\langle X_R \rangle \approx 1.2$. The correction factor $\langle X_R \rangle$ is dependent upon the primary star properties and ranges from $\langle X_R \rangle \approx 1.6$ for A and F stars to $\langle X_R \rangle \approx 1.2$ for K and M stars. For missions like K2 and TESS where the stars may be closer than the stars in the Kepler target sample, observational vetting (primary imaging) reduces the radius correction factor to $\langle X_R \rangle \approx 1.1$. Finally, we show that if the stellar multiplicity rates are not accounted for correctly, occurrence rate calculations for Earth-sized planets may overestimate the frequency of small planets by as much as $15-20$\%.
  • We present 197 planet candidates discovered using data from the first year of the NASA K2 mission (Campaigns 0-4), along with the results of an intensive program of photometric analyses, stellar spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging, and statistical validation. We distill these candidates into sets of 104 validated planets (57 in multi-planet systems), 30 false positives, and 63 remaining candidates. Our validated systems span a range of properties, with median values of R_P = 2.3 R_E, P=8.6 d, Tef = 5300 K, and Kp=12.7 mag. Stellar spectroscopy provides precise stellar and planetary parameters for most of these systems. We show that K2 has increased by 30% the number of small planets known to orbit moderately bright stars (1-4 R_E, Kp=9-13 mag). Of particular interest are 37 planets smaller than 2 R_E, 15 orbiting stars brighter than Kp=11.5, five receiving Earth-like irradiation levels, and several multi-planet systems -- including four planets orbiting the M dwarf K2-72 near mean-motion resonances. By quantifying the likelihood that each candidate is a planet we demonstrate that our candidate sample has an overall false positive rate of 15-30%, with rates substantially lower for small candidates (< 2 R_E) and larger for candidates with radii > 8 R_E and/or with P < 3 d. Extrapolation of the current planetary yield suggests that K2 will discover between 500-1000 planets in its planned four-year mission -- assuming sufficient follow-up resources are available. Efficient observing and analysis, together with an organized and coherent follow-up strategy, is essential to maximize the efficacy of planet-validation efforts for K2, TESS, and future large-scale surveys.
  • Theories of the formation and early evolution of planetary systems postulate that planets are born in circumstellar disks, and undergo radial migration during and after dissipation of the dust and gas disk from which they formed. The precise ages of meteorites indicate that planetesimals - the building blocks of planets - are produced within the first million years of a star's life. A prominent question is: how early can one find fully formed planets like those frequently detected on short orbital periods around mature stars? Some theories suggest the in situ formation of planets close to their host stars is unlikely and the existence of such planets is evidence for large scale migration. Other theories posit that planet assembly at small orbital separations may be common. Here we report on a newly-born, transiting planet orbiting its star every 5.4 days. The planet is 50 per cent larger than Neptune, and its mass is less than 3.6 times Jupiter (at 99.7 per cent confidence), with a true mass likely to be within a factor of several of Neptune's. The 5-10 million year old star has a tenuous dust disk extending outwards from about 2 times the Earth-Sun separation, in addition to the large planet located at less than one-twentieth the Earth-Sun separation.
  • We present a catalog of 11 multi-planet systems from Campaigns 1 and 2 of the K2 mission. We report the sizes and orbits of 26 planets split between seven 2-planet systems and four 3-planet systems. These planets stem from a systematic search of the K2 photometry for all dwarf stars observed by K2 in these fields. We precisely characterized the host stars with adaptive optics imaging and analysis of high-resolution optical spectra from Keck/HIRES and medium-resolution spectra from IRTF/SpeX. We confirm two planet candidates by mass detection and validate the remaining 24 candidates to $>99\%$ confidence. Thirteen planets were previously validated or confirmed by other studies and 24 were previously identified as planet candidates. The planets are mostly smaller than Neptune (21/26 planets) as in the Kepler mission and all have short periods ($P < 50$ d) due to the duration of the K2 photometry. The host stars are relatively bright (most have $Kp < 12.5$ mag) and are amenable to follow-up characterization. For K2-38, we measured precise radial velocities using Keck/HIRES and provide initial estimates of the planet masses. K2-38b is a short-period super-Earth with a radius of $1.55 \pm 0.16~R_\oplus$, a mass of $12.0 \pm 2.9~M_\oplus$, and a high density consistent with an iron-rich composition. The outer planet K2-38c is a lower density sub-Neptune-size planet with a radius of $2.42 \pm 0.29~R_\oplus$ and a mass of $9.9 \pm 4.6~M_\oplus$ that likely has a substantial envelope. This new planet sample demonstrates the capability of K2 to discover numerous planetary systems around bright stars.
  • We report the discovery and confirmation of two sub-Saturn planets orbiting a bright (V = 11.3), metal-rich ([Fe/H] = 0.42 $\pm$ 0.04 dex) G3 dwarf in the K2 Campaign 2 field. The planets are 5.68 $\pm$ 0.56 Earth-radii and 7.82 $\pm$ 0.72 Earth-radii and have orbital periods of 20.8851 $\pm$ 0.0003 d and 42.3633$\pm$0.0006 d, near to the 2:1 mean-motion resonance. We obtained 32 radial velocities (RVs) with Keck/HIRES and detected the reflex motion due to EPIC-203771098b and c. These planets have masses of 21.0 $\pm$ 5.4 Earth-masses and 27.0 $\pm$ 6.9 Earth-masses, respectively. With low densities of 0.63 $\pm$ 0.25 g/cc and 0.31 $\pm$ 0.12 g/cc, respectively, the planets require thick envelopes of H/He to explain their large sizes and low masses. Interior structure models predict that the planets have fairly massive cores of 17.6 $\pm$ 4.3 Earth-masses and 16.1 $\pm$ 4.2 Earth-masses, respectively. They may have formed exterior to their present locations, accreted their H/He envelopes at large orbital distances, and migrated in as a resonant pair. The proximity to resonance, large transit depths, and host star brightness offer rich opportunities for TTV follow-up. Finally, the low surface gravities of the EPIC-203771098 planets make them favorable targets for transmission spectroscopy by HST, Spitzer, and JWST.
  • We use high time cadence, high spectral resolution optical observations to detect excess H-alpha emission from the 2 - 3 Myr old weak lined T Tauri star PTFO8-8695. This excess emission appears to move in velocity as expected if it were produced by the suspected planetary companion to this young star. The excess emission is not always present, but when it is, the predicted velocity motion is often observed. We have considered the possibility that the observed excess emission is produced by stellar activity (flares), accretion from a disk, or a planetary companion; we find the planetary companion to be the most likely explanation. If this is the case, the strength of the H-alpha line indicates that the emission comes from an extended volume around the planet, likely fed by mass loss from the planet which is expected to be overflowing its Roche lobe.
  • The ~2 Myr old classical T Tauri star CI Tau shows periodic variability in its radial velocity (RV) variations measured at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. We find that these observations are consistent with a massive planet in a ~9-day period orbit. These results are based on 71 IR RV measurements of this system obtained over 5 years, and on 26 optical RV measurements obtained over 9 years. CI Tau was also observed photometrically in the optical on 34 nights over ~one month in 2012. The optical RV data alone are inadequate to identify an orbital period, likely the result of star spot and activity induced noise for this relatively small dataset. The infrared RV measurements reveal significant periodicity at ~9 days. In addition, the full set of optical and IR RV measurements taken together phase coherently and with equal amplitudes to the ~9 day period. Periodic radial velocity signals can in principle be produced by cool spots, hot spots, and reflection of the stellar spectrum off the inner disk, in addition to resulting from a planetary companion. We have considered each of these and find the planet hypothesis most consistent with the data. The radial velocity amplitude yields an Msin(i) of ~8.1 M_Jup; in conjunction with a 1.3 mm continuum emission measurement of the circumstellar disk inclination from the literature, we find a planet mass of ~11.3 M_Jup, assuming alignment of the planetary orbit with the disk.
  • The prime Kepler mission revealed that small planets (<4 R_earth) are common, especially around low-mass M dwarfs. K2, the re-purposed Kepler mission, continues this exploration of small planets around small stars. Here we combine K2 photometry with spectroscopy, adaptive optics imaging, and archival survey images to analyze two small planets orbiting the nearby, field age, M dwarfs K2-26 (EPIC 202083828) and K2-9. K2-26 is an M1.0 +/- 0.5 dwarf at 93 +/- 7 pc from K2 Campaign 0. We validate its 14.5665 d period planet and estimate a radius of 2.67^+0.46_-0.42 R_earth. K2-9 is an M2.5 +/- 0.5 dwarf at 110 +/- 12 pc from K2 Campaign 1. K2-9b was first identified by Montet et al. 2015; here we present spectra and adaptive optics imaging of the host star and independently validate and characterize the planet. Our analyses indicate K2-9b is a 2.25^+0.53_-0.96 R_earth planet with a 18.4498 d period. K2-26b exhibits a transit duration that is too long to be consistent with a circular orbit given the measured stellar radius. Thus, the long transits are likely due to the photoeccentric effect and our transit fits hint at an eccentric orbit. Both planets receive low incident flux from their host stars and have estimated equilibrium temperatures <500 K. K2-9b may receive approximately Earth-like insolation. However, its host star exhibits strong GALEX UV emission which could affect any atmosphere it harbors. K2-26b and K2-9b are representatives of a poorly studied class of small planets with cool temperatures that have radii intermediate to Earth and Neptune. Future study of these systems can provide key insight into trends in bulk composition and atmospheric properties at the transition from silicate dominated to volatile rich bodies.
  • In preparation for observations with the $\textit{James Webb Space Telescope}$ ($\textit{JWST}$), we have identified new members of the nearby, young M dwarf sample and compiled an up to date list of these stars. Here we summarize our efforts to identify young M dwarfs, describe the current sample, and detail its demographics in the context of direct planet imaging. We also describe our investigations of the unprecedented sensitivity of the $\textit{JWST}$ when imaging nearby, young M dwarfs. The $\textit{JWST}$ is the only near term facility capable of routinely pushing direct imaging capabilities around M dwarfs to sub-Jovian masses and will provide key insight into questions regarding low-mass gas-giant properties, frequency, formation, and architectures.
  • Discoveries from the prime Kepler mission demonstrated that small planets (< 3 Earth-radii) are common outcomes of planet formation. While Kepler detected many such planets, all but a handful orbit faint, distant stars and are not amenable to precise follow up measurements. Here, we report the discovery of two small planets transiting K2-21, a bright (K = 9.4) M0 dwarf located 65$\pm$6 pc from Earth. We detected the transiting planets in photometry collected during Campaign 3 of NASA's K2 mission. Analysis of transit light curves reveals that the planets have small radii compared to their host star, 2.60 $\pm$ 0.14% and 3.15 $\pm$ 0.20%, respectively. We obtained follow up NIR spectroscopy of K2-21 to constrain host star properties, which imply planet sizes of 1.59 $\pm$ 0.43 Earth-radii and 1.92 $\pm$ 0.53 Earth-radii, respectively, straddling the boundary between high-density, rocky planets and low-density planets with thick gaseous envelopes. The planets have orbital periods of 9.32414 days and 15.50120 days, respectively, and have a period ratio of 1.6624, very near to the 5:3 mean motion resonance, which may be a record of the system's formation history. Transit timing variations (TTVs) due to gravitational interactions between the planets may be detectable using ground-based telescopes. Finally, this system offers a convenient laboratory for studying the bulk composition and atmospheric properties of small planets with low equilibrium temperatures.
  • HD 19467 B is presently the only directly imaged T dwarf companion known to induce a measurable Doppler acceleration around a solar type star. We present spectroscopy measurements of this important benchmark object taken with the Project 1640 integral field unit at Palomar Observatory. Our high-contrast R~30 observations obtained simultaneously across the $JH$ bands confirm the cold nature of the companion as reported from the discovery article and determine its spectral type for the first time. Fitting the measured spectral energy distribution to SpeX/IRTF T dwarf standards and synthetic spectra from BT-Settl atmospheric models, we find that HD 19467 B is a T5.5+/-1 dwarf with effective temperature Teff=$978^{+20}_{-43}$ K. Our observations reveal significant methane absorption affirming its substellar nature. HD 19467 B shows promise to become the first T dwarf that simultaneously reveals its mass, age, and metallicity independent from the spectrum of light that it emits.
  • We used the CHARA Array to directly measure the angular diameter of HD 69830, home to three Neptune mass planets and an asteroid belt. Our measurement of 0.674+/-0.014 milli-arcseconds for the limb-darkened angular diameter of this star leads to a physical radius of R$_*$ = 0.9058$\pm$0.0190 R\sun and luminosity of L* = 0.622+/-0.014 Lsun when combined with a fit to the spectral energy distribution of the star. Placing these observed values on an Hertzsprung-Russel (HR) diagram along with stellar evolution isochrones produces an age of 10.6+/-4 Gyr and mass of 0.863$\pm$0.043 M\sun. We use archival optical echelle spectra of HD 69830 along with an iterative spectral fitting technique to measure the iron abundance ([Fe/H]=-0.04+/-0.03), effective temperature (5385+/-44 K) and surface gravity (log g = 4.49+/-0.06). We use these new values for the temperature and luminosity to calculate a more precise age of 7.5+/-Gyr. Applying the values of stellar luminosity and radius to recent models on the optimistic location of the habitable zone produces a range of 0.61-1.44 AU; partially outside the orbit of the furthest known planet (d) around HD 69830. Finally, we estimate the snow line at a distance of 1.95+/-0.19 AU, which is outside the orbit of all three planets and its asteroid belt.
  • The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) spacecraft has been reactivated as NEOWISE-R to characterize and search for Near Earth Objects. The brown dwarf WISE J085510.83-071442.5 has now been reobserved by NEOWISE-R, and we confirm the results of Luhman (2014b), who found a very low effective temperature ($\approx 250$ K), a very high proper motion (8.1 +/- 0.1 arcsec/yr) , and a large parallax (454 +/- 45 mas). The large proper motion has separated the brown dwarf from the background sources that influenced the 2010 WISE data, allowing a measurement of a very red WISE color of W1-W2 $> 3.9$ mag. A re-analysis of the 2010 WISE astrometry using only the W2 band, combined with the new NEOWISE-R 2014 position, gives an improved parallax of 448 +/- 33 mas and proper motion of 8.08 +/- 0.05\; arcsec/yr. These are all consistent with Luhman (2014b).
  • We present the discovery of a co-moving planetary-mass companion ~42" (~2000 AU) from a young M3 star, GU Psc, likely member of the young AB Doradus Moving Group (ABDMG). The companion was first identified via its distinctively red i - z color (> 3.5) through a survey made with Gemini-S/GMOS. Follow-up Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/WIRCam near-infrared (NIR) imaging, Gemini-N/GNIRS NIR spectroscopy and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry indicate a spectral type of T3.5+-1 and reveal signs of low gravity which we attribute to youth. Keck/Adaptive Optics NIR observations did not resolve the companion as a binary. A comparison with atmosphere models indicates Teff = 1000-1100 K and logg = 4.5-5.0. Based on evolution models, this temperature corresponds to a mass of 9-13 MJup for the age of ABDMG (70-130 Myr). The relatively well-constrained age of this companion and its very large angular separation to its host star will allow its thorough characterization and will make it a valuable comparison for planetary-mass companions that will be uncovered by forthcoming planet-finder instruments such as Gemini Planet Imager and SPHERE.
  • The AllWISE processing pipeline has measured motions for all objects detected on WISE images taken between 2010 January and 2011 February. In this paper, we discuss new capabilities made to the software pipeline in order to make motion measurements possible, and we characterize the resulting data products for use by future researchers. Using a stringent set of selection criteria, we find 22,445 objects that have significant AllWISE motions, of which 3,525 have motions that can be independently confirmed from earlier 2MASS images yet lack any published motions in SIMBAD. Another 58 sources lack 2MASS counterparts and are presented as motion candidates only. Limited spectroscopic follow-up of this list has already revealed eight new L subdwarfs. These may provide the first hints of a "subdwarf gap" at mid-L types that would indicate the break between the stellar and substellar populations at low metallicities (i.e., old ages). Another object in the motion list -- WISEA J154045.67-510139.3 -- is a bright (J ~ 9 mag) object of type M6; both the spectrophotometric distance and a crude preliminary parallax place it ~6 pc from the Sun. We also compare our list of motion objects to the recently published list of 762 WISE motion objects from Luhman (2014). While these first large motion studies with WISE data have been very successful in revealing previously overlooked nearby dwarfs, both studies missed objects that the other found, demonstrating that many other nearby objects likely await discovery in the AllWISE data products.
  • We have discovered a wide separation (188.5") T8 subdwarf companion to the sdM1.5+WD binary Wolf 1130. Companionship of WISE J200520.38+542433.9 is verified through common proper motion over a ~3 year baseline. Wolf 1130 is located 15.83 +/- 0.96 parsecs from the Sun, placing the brown dwarf at a projected separation of ~3000 AU. Near-infrared colors and medium resolution (R~2000-4000) spectroscopy establish the uniqueness of this system as a high-gravity, low-metallicity benchmark. Although there are a number of low-metallicity T dwarfs in the literature, WISE J200520.38+542433.9 has the most extreme inferred metallicity to date with [Fe/H] = -0.64 +/- 0.17 based on Wolf 1130. Model comparisons to this exemplar late-type subdwarf support it having an old age, a low metallicity, and a small radius. However, the spectroscopic peculiarities of WISE J200520.38+542433.9 underscore the importance of developing the low-metallicity parameter space of the most current atmospheric models.
  • We present the discovery of a very cold, very low mass, nearby brown dwarf using data from the NASA Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The object, WISE J064723.23-623235.5, has a very red WISE color of W1-W2 > 3.77 mag and a very red Spitzer Space Telescope color of ch1-ch2 = 2.82+/-0.09 mag. In J_MKO-ch2 color (7.58+/-0.27 mag) it is one of the two or three reddest brown dwarfs known. Our grism spectrum from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) confirms it to be the seventeenth Y dwarf discovered, and its spectral type of Y1+/-0.5 makes it one of the four latest-type Y dwarfs classified. Astrometric imaging from Spitzer and HST, combined with data from WISE, provides a preliminary parallax of pi = 115+/-12 mas (d = 8.7+/-0.9 pc) and proper motion of mu = 387+/-25 mas/yr based on 2.5 years of monitoring. The spectrum implies a blue J-H color, for which model atmosphere calculations suggest a relatively low surface gravity. The best fit to these models indicates an effective temperature of 350-400K and a mass of ~5-30 M_Jup. Kinematic analysis hints that this object may belong to the Columba moving group, which would support an age of ~30 Myr and thus an even lower mass of <2 M_Jup, but verification would require a radial velocity measurement not currently possible for a J=22.7 mag brown dwarf.
  • We report observations of a possible young transiting planet orbiting a previously known weak-lined T-Tauri star in the 7-10 Myr old Orion-OB1a/25-Ori region. The candidate was found as part of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project. It has a photometric transit period of 0.448413 +- 0.000040 days, and appears in both 2009 and 2010 PTF data. Follow-up low-precision radial velocity (RV) observations and adaptive optics imaging suggest that the star is not an eclipsing binary, and that it is unlikely that a background source is blended with the target and mimicking the observed transit. RV observations with the Hobby-Eberly and Keck telescopes yield an RV that has the same period as the photometric event, but is offset in phase from the transit center by approximately -0.22 periods. The amplitude (half range) of the RV variations is 2.4 km/s and is comparable with the expected RV amplitude that stellar spots could induce. The RV curve is likely dominated by stellar spot modulation and provides an upper limit to the projected companion mass of M_p sin i_orb < 4.8 +- 1.2 M_Jup; when combined with the orbital inclination, i orb, of the candidate planet from modeling of the transit light curve, we find an upper limit on the mass of the planetary candidate of M_p < 5.5 +- 1.4 M_Jup. This limit implies that the planet is orbiting close to, if not inside, its Roche limiting orbital radius, so that it may be undergoing active mass loss and evaporation.