• We present a photometric study of the dwarf galaxy population in the core region ($< r_{\rm vir}/4$) of the Fornax galaxy cluster based on deep $u'g'i'$ photometry from the Next Generation Fornax Cluster Survey. All imaging data were obtained with the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the 4-meter Blanco telescope at the Cerro-Tololo Interamerican Observatory. We identify 258 dwarf galaxy candidates with luminosities $-17 < M_{g'} < -8$ mag, corresponding to typical stellar masses of $9.5\gtrsim \log{\cal M}_{\star}/M_\odot \gtrsim 5.5$, reaching $\sim\!3$ mag deeper in point-source luminosity and $\sim\!4$ mag deeper in surface-brightness sensitivity compared to the classic Fornax Cluster Catalog. Morphological analysis shows that surface-brightness profiles are well represented by single-component S\'ersic models with average S\'ersic indices of $\langle n\rangle_{u',g',i'}=(0.78-0.83) \pm 0.02$, and average effective radii of $\langle r_e\rangle_{u',g',i'}\!=(0.67-0.70) \pm 0.02$ kpc. Color-magnitude relations indicate a flattening of the galaxy red sequence at faint galaxy luminosities, similar to the one recently discovered in the Virgo cluster. A comparison with population synthesis models and the galaxy mass-metallicity relation reveals that the average faint dwarf galaxy is likely older than ~5 Gyr. We study galaxy scaling relations between stellar mass, effective radius, and stellar mass surface density over a stellar mass range covering six orders of magnitude. We find that over the sampled stellar mass range several distinct mechanisms of galaxy mass assembly can be identified: i) dwarf galaxies assemble mass inside the half-mass radius up to $\log{\cal M}_{\star}$ ~8.0, ii) isometric mass assembly in the range $8.0 < \log{\cal M}_{\star}/M_\odot < 10.5$, and iii) massive galaxies assemble stellar mass predominantly in their halos at $\log{\cal M}_{\star}$ ~10.5 and above.
  • We present an analysis of 39 nuclei and their early-type hosts in the Virgo Cluster using ten broadband filters: F300W, F475W, F850LP, F160W, $u^*griz$, and $K_s$. We describe the Virgo Redux program, which provides high-resolution UV and NIR imaging. Combining this data with optical and NIR imaging from the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey and the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey, we estimate masses, metallicities and ages using simple stellar population (SSP) models. For 19 nuclei, we compare to SSP parameters derived from Keck and Gemini spectra and find reasonable agreement between the photometric and spectroscopic metallicity: the RMS scatter is 0.3 dex. We reproduce the nucleus-galaxy mass fraction of $0.33^{+0.09}_{-0.07}$ percent for galaxy stellar masses $10^{8.4}-10^{10.3} M_\odot$ with a typical precision of $\sim$35% for the nuclei masses. Based on available model predictions, there is no single preferred formation scenario for nuclei, suggesting that nuclei are formed stochastically through a mix of processes. Nuclei metallicities are statistically identical to those of their hosts, appearing $0.07 \pm 0.3$ dex more metal-rich on average -- although, omitting galaxies with unusual origins, nuclei are $0.20\pm0.28$ dex more metal-rich. Nuclei appear to be $0.56 \pm 0.12$ dex more metal rich than ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) at fixed mass. We find no clear age difference between nuclei and their galaxies, with nuclei displaying a broad range of ages. Interestingly, we find that the most massive nuclei may be flatter and more closely aligned with the semi-major axes of their hosts, suggesting that they formed through predominantly dissipative processes.
  • We present an analysis of high-quality photometry for globular clusters (GCs) in the Virgo cluster core region, based on data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) pilot field, and in the Milky Way (MW) based on VLT/X-Shooter spectrophotometry. We find significant discrepancies in color-color diagrams between sub-samples from different environments, confirming that the environment has a strong influence on the integrated colors of GCs. GC color distributions along a single color are not sufficient to capture the differences we observe in color-color space. While the average photometric colors become bluer with increasing radial distance to the cD galaxy M87, we also find a relation between the environment and the slope and intercept of the color-color relations. A denser environment seems to produce a larger dynamic range in certain color indices. We argue that these results are not due solely to differential extinction, IMF variations, calibration uncertainties, or overall age/metallicity variations. We therefore suggest that the relation between the environment and GC colors is, at least in part, due to chemical abundance variations, which affect stellar spectra and stellar evolution tracks. Our results demonstrate that stellar population diagnostics derived from model predictions which are calibrated on one particular sample of GCs may not be appropriate for all extragalactic GCs. These results advocate a more complex model of the assembly history of GC systems in massive galaxies that goes beyond the simple bimodality found in previous decades.
  • We have used deep, wide-field optical imaging to study the faint outskirts of the luminous spiral galaxy M101 (NGC 5457), as well as its surrounding environment. Over six square degrees, our imaging has a limiting surface brightness of mu_B ~ 29.5 mag/arcsec^2, and has revealed the stellar structure of M101's disk out to nearly 25 arcminutes (50 kpc), three times our measured R25 isophotal size of the optical disk. At these radii, the well-known asymmetry of the inner disk slews 180 degrees, resulting in an asymmetric plume of light at large radius which follows the very extended HI disk to the northeast of M101. This plume has very blue colors (B-V ~ 0.2), suggesting it is the somewhat more evolved (few hundred Myr to ~ 1 Gyr) counterpart of the young far ultraviolet emitting population traced by GALEX imaging. We also detect another, redder spur of extended light to the east of the disk, and both structures are reminiscent of features produced during fly-by galaxy interactions. However, we see no evidence of very extended tidal tails around M101 or any of its companions which might be expected from a recent encounter with a massive companion. We consider the properties of M101's outer disk in light of possible past interactions with the nearby companion galaxies NGC 5477 and NGC 5474. The detection of optical starlight at such large radii gives us the ability to study star formation histories and stellar populations in outer disks over a longer timescales than those traced by the UV or Halpha emitting populations. Our data suggest ongoing buildup of the M101's outer disk due to encounters in the group environment triggering extended star formation and tidal heating of existing disk populations.