• The resemblance between the methods used in quantum-many body physics and in machine learning has drawn considerable attention. In particular, tensor networks (TNs) and deep learning architectures bear striking similarities to the extent that TNs can be used for machine learning. Previous results used one-dimensional TNs in image recognition, showing limited scalability and flexibilities. In this work, we train two-dimensional hierarchical TNs to solve image recognition problems, using a training algorithm derived from the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz. This approach introduces mathematical connections among quantum many-body physics, quantum information theory, and machine learning. While keeping the TN unitary in the training phase, TN states are defined, which encode classes of images into quantum many-body states. We study the quantum features of the TN states, including quantum entanglement and fidelity. We find these quantities could be properties that characterize the image classes, as well as the machine learning tasks.
  • Searching for simple models that possess non-trivial controlling properties is one of the central tasks in the field of quantum technologies. In this work, we construct a quantum spin-$1/2$ chain of finite size, termed as controllable spin wire (CSW), in which we have $\hat{S}^{z} \hat{S}^{z}$ (Ising) interactions with a transverse field in the bulk, and $\hat{S}^{x} \hat{S}^{z}$ and $\hat{S}^{z} \hat{S}^{z}$ couplings with a canted field on the boundaries. The Hamiltonians on the boundaries, dubbed as tuning Hamiltonians (TH's), bear the same form as the effective Hamiltonians emerging in the so-called `quantum entanglement simulator' that is originally proposed for mimicking infinite models. We show that tuning the TH's (parametrized by $\alpha$) can trigger non-trivial controlling of the bulk properties, including the degeneracy of energy/entanglement spectra, and the response to the magnetic field $h_{bulk}$ in the bulk. A universal point dubbed as $\alpha^s$ emerges. For $\alpha > \alpha^s$, the ground-state diagram versus $h_{bulk}$ consists of three `phases', which are Ne\'eL and polarized phases, and an emergent pseudo-magnet phase, distinguished by entanglement and magnetization. For $\alpha < \alpha^s$, the phase diagram changes completely, with no step-like behaviors to distinguish phases. Due to its controlling properties and simplicity, the CSW could potentially serve in future the experiments for developing quantum devices.
  • Tensor network (TN), a young mathematical tool of high vitality and great potential, has been undergoing extremely rapid developments in the last two decades, gaining tremendous success in condensed matter physics, atomic physics, quantum information science, statistical physics, and so on. In this lecture notes, we focus on the contraction algorithms of TN as well as some of the applications to the simulations of quantum many-body systems. Starting from basic concepts and definitions, we first explain the relations between TN and physical problems, including the TN representations of classical partition functions, quantum many-body states (by matrix product state, tree TN, and projected entangled pair state), time evolution simulations, etc. These problems, which are challenging to solve, can be transformed to TN contraction problems. We present then several paradigm algorithms based on the ideas of the numerical renormalization group and/or boundary states, including density matrix renormalization group, time-evolving block decimation, coarse-graining/corner tensor renormalization group, and several distinguished variational algorithms. Finally, we revisit the TN approaches from the perspective of multi-linear algebra (also known as tensor algebra or tensor decompositions) and quantum simulation. Despite the apparent differences in the ideas and strategies of different TN algorithms, we aim at revealing the underlying relations and resemblances in order to present a systematic picture to understand the TN contraction approaches.
  • With the proliferation of small aerial vehicles, acquiring close up aerial imagery for high quality reconstruction of complex scenes is gaining importance. We present an adaptive view planning method to collect such images in an automated fashion. We start by sampling a small set of views to build a coarse proxy to the scene. We then present (i)~a method that builds a view manifold for view selection, and (ii) an algorithm to select a sparse set of views. The vehicle then visits these viewpoints to cover the scene, and the procedure is repeated until reconstruction quality converges or a desired level of quality is achieved. The view manifold provides an effective efficiency/quality compromise between using the entire 6 degree of freedom pose space and using a single view hemisphere to select the views. Our results show that, in contrast to existing "explore and exploit" methods which collect only two sets of views, reconstruction quality can be drastically improved by adding a third set. They also indicate that three rounds of data collection is sufficient even for very complex scenes. We compare our algorithm to existing methods in three challenging scenes. We require each algorithm to select the same number of views. Our algorithm generates views which produce the least reconstruction error.
  • The ability to confine light into tiny spatial dimensions is important for applications such as microscopy, sensing and nanoscale lasers. While plasmons offer an appealing avenue to confine light, Landau damping in metals imposes a trade-off between optical field confinement and losses. We show that a graphene-insulator-metal heterostructure can overcome that trade-off, and demonstrate plasmon confinement down to the ultimate limit of the lengthscale of one atom. This is achieved by far-field excitation of plasmon modes squeezed into an atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride dielectric h-BN spacer between graphene and metal rods. A theoretical model which takes into account the non-local optical response of both graphene and metal is used to describe the results. These ultra-confined plasmonic modes, addressed with far-field light excitation, enables a route to new regimes of ultra-strong light-matter interactions.
  • Estimating positions of world points from features observed in images is a key problem in 3D reconstruction, image mosaicking,simultaneous localization and mapping and structure from motion. We consider a special instance in which there is a dominant ground plane $\mathcal{G}$ viewed from a parallel viewing plane $\mathcal{S}$ above it. Such instances commonly arise, for example, in aerial photography. Consider a world point $g \in \mathcal{G}$ and its worst case reconstruction uncertainty $\varepsilon(g,\mathcal{S})$ obtained by merging \emph{all} possible views of $g$ chosen from $\mathcal{S}$. We first show that one can pick two views $s_p$ and $s_q$ such that the uncertainty $\varepsilon(g,\{s_p,s_q\})$ obtained using only these two views is almost as good as (i.e. within a small constant factor of) $\varepsilon(g,\mathcal{S})$. Next, we extend the result to the entire ground plane $\mathcal{G}$ and show that one can pick a small subset of $\mathcal{S'} \subseteq \mathcal{S}$ (which grows only linearly with the area of $\mathcal{G}$) and still obtain a constant factor approximation, for every point $g \in \mathcal{G}$, to the minimum worst case estimate obtained by merging all views in $\mathcal{S}$. Finally, we present a multi-resolution view selection method which extends our techniques to non-planar scenes. We show that the method can produce rich and accurate dense reconstructions with a small number of views. Our results provide a view selection mechanism with provable performance guarantees which can drastically increase the speed of scene reconstruction algorithms. In addition to theoretical results, we demonstrate their effectiveness in an application where aerial imagery is used for monitoring farms and orchards.
  • Due to the presence of strong correlations, theoretical or experimental investigations of quantum many-body systems belong to the most challenging tasks in modern physics. Stimulated by tensor networks, we propose a scheme of constructing the few-body models that can be easily accessed by theoretical or experimental means, to accurately capture the ground-state properties of infinite many-body systems in higher dimensions. The general idea is to embed a small bulk of the infinite model in an "entanglement bath" so that the many-body effects can be faithfully mimicked. The approach we propose is efficient, simple, flexible, sign-problem-free, and it directly accesses the thermodynamic limit. The numerical results of the spin models on honeycomb and simple cubic lattices show that the ground-state properties including quantum phase transitions and the critical behaviors are accurately captured by only $\mathcal{O}(10)$ physical and bath sites. Moreover, since the few-body Hamiltonian only contains local interactions among a handful of sites, our work provides new ways of studying the many-body phenomena in the infinite strongly-correlated systems by mimicking them in the few-body experiments using cold atoms/ions, or developing novel quantum devices by utilizing the many-body features.
  • Characterizing criticality in quantum many-body systems of dimension $\ge 2$ is one of the most important challenges of the contemporary physics. In principle, there is no generally valid theoretical method that could solve this problem. In this work, we propose an efficient approach to identify the criticality of quantum systems in higher dimensions. Departing from the analysis of the numerical renormalization group flows, we build a general equivalence between the higher-dimensional ground state and a one-dimensional (1D) quantum state defined in the imaginary time direction in terms of the so-called time matrix product state (tMPS). We show that the criticality of the targeted model can be faithfully identified by the tMPS, using the mature scaling schemes of correlation length and entanglement entropy in 1D quantum theories. We benchmark our proposal with the results obtained for the Heisenberg anti-ferromagnet on honeycomb lattice. We demonstrate critical scaling relation of the tMPS for the gapless case, and a trivial scaling for the gapped case with spatial anisotropy. The critical scaling behaviors are insensitive to the system size, suggesting the criticality can be identified in small systems. Our tMPS scheme for critical scaling shows clearly that the spin-1/2 kagom\'e Heisenberg antiferromagnet has a gapless ground state. More generally, the present study indicates that the 1D conformal field theories in imaginary time provide a very useful tool to characterize the criticality of higher dimensional quantum systems.
  • We study correlation functions in the one-dimensional $\mathcal{N}=2$ supersymmetric SYK model. The leading order 4-point correlation functions are computed by summing over ladder diagrams expanded in a suitable basis of conformal eigenfunctions. A novelty of the $\mathcal{N}=2$ model is that both symmetric and antisymmetric eigenfunctions are required. Although we use a component formalism, we verify that the operator spectrum and 4-point functions are consistent with $\mathcal{N}=2$ supersymmetry. We also confirm the maximally chaotic behavior of this model and comment briefly on its 6-point functions.
  • For safe and efficient planning and control in autonomous driving, we need a driving policy which can achieve desirable driving quality in long-term horizon with guaranteed safety and feasibility. Optimization-based approaches, such as Model Predictive Control (MPC), can provide such optimal policies, but their computational complexity is generally unacceptable for real-time implementation. To address this problem, we propose a fast integrated planning and control framework that combines learning- and optimization-based approaches in a two-layer hierarchical structure. The first layer, defined as the "policy layer", is established by a neural network which learns the long-term optimal driving policy generated by MPC. The second layer, called the "execution layer", is a short-term optimization-based controller that tracks the reference trajecotries given by the "policy layer" with guaranteed short-term safety and feasibility. Moreover, with efficient and highly-representative features, a small-size neural network is sufficient in the "policy layer" to handle many complicated driving scenarios. This renders online imitation learning with Dataset Aggregation (DAgger) so that the performance of the "policy layer" can be improved rapidly and continuously online. Several exampled driving scenarios are demonstrated to verify the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed framework.
  • We investigate the ground state and finite-temperature properties of the spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on an infinite octa-kagome lattice by utilizing state-of-the-art tensor network-based numerical methods. It is shown that the ground state has a vanishing local magnetization and possesses a $1/2$-magnetization plateau with up-down-up-up spin configuration. A quantum phase transition at the critical coupling ratio $J_{d}/J_{t}=0.6$ is found. When $0<J_{d}/J_{t}<0.6$, the system is in a valence bond state, where an obvious zero-magnetization plateau is observed, implying a gapful spin excitation; when $J_{d}/J_{t}>0.6$, the system exhibits a gapless excitation, in which the dimer-dimer correlation is found decaying in a power law, while the spin-spin and chiral-chiral correlation functions decay exponentially. At the isotropic point ($J_{d}/J_{t}=1$), we unveil that at low temperature ($T$) the specific heat depends linearly on $T$, and the susceptibility tends to a constant for $T\rightarrow 0$, giving rise to a Wilson ratio around unity, implying that the system under interest is a fermionic algebraic quantum spin liquid.
  • We consider a supersymmetric SYK-like model without quenched disorder that is built by coupling two kinds of fermionic N=1 tensor-valued superfields, "quarks" and "mesons". We prove that the model has a well-defined large-N limit in which the (s)quark 2-point functions are dominated by mesonic "melon" diagrams. We sum these diagrams to obtain the Schwinger-Dyson equations and show that in the IR, the solution agrees with that of the supersymmetric SYK model.
  • We consider the relation between SYK-like models and vector models by studying a toy model where a tensor field is coupled with a vector field. By integrating out the tensor field, the toy model reduces to the Gross-Neveu model in 1 dimension. On the other hand, a certain perturbation can be turned on and the toy model flows to an SYK-like model at low energy. A chaotic-nonchaotic phase transition occurs as the sign of the perturbation is altered. We further study similar models that possess chaos and enhanced reparameterization symmetries.
  • The relation between the bosonic higher spin ${\cal W}_\infty[\lambda]$ algebra, the affine Yangian of $\mathfrak{gl}_{1}$, and the SH$^c$ algebra is established in detail. For generic $\lambda$ we find explicit expressions for the low-lying ${\cal W}_\infty[\lambda]$ modes in terms of the affine Yangian generators, and deduce from this the precise identification between $\lambda$ and the parameters of the affine Yangian. Furthermore, for the free field cases corresponding to $\lambda=0$ and $\lambda=1$ we give closed-form expressions for the affine Yangian generators in terms of the free fields. Interestingly, the relation between the ${\cal W}_\infty$ modes and those of the affine Yangian is a non-local one, in general. We also establish the explicit dictionary between the affine Yangian and the SH$^c$ generators. Given that Yangian algebras are the hallmark of integrability, these identifications should pave the way towards uncovering the relation between the integrable and the higher spin symmetries.
  • In the effort to make 2D materials-based devices smaller, faster, and more efficient, it is important to control charge carrier at lengths approaching the nanometer scale. Traditional gating techniques based on capacitive coupling through a gate dielectric cannot generate strong and uniform electric fields at this scale due to divergence of the fields in dielectrics. This field divergence limits the gating strength, boundary sharpness, and pitch size of periodic structures, and restricts possible geometries of local gates (due to wire packaging), precluding certain device concepts, such as plasmonics and transformation optics based on metamaterials. Here we present a new gating concept based on a dielectric-free self-aligned electrolyte technique that allows spatially modulating charges with nanometer resolution. We employ a combination of a solid-polymer electrolyte gate and an ion-impenetrable e-beam-defined resist mask to locally create excess charges on top of the gated surface. Electrostatic simulations indicate high carrier density variations of $\Delta n =10^{14}\text{cm}^{-2}$ across a length of 10 nm at the mask boundaries on the surface of a 2D conductor, resulting in a sharp depletion region and a strong in-plane electric field of $6\times10^8 \text{Vm}^{-1}$ across the so-created junction. We apply this technique to the 2D material graphene to demonstrate the creation of tunable p-n junctions for optoelectronic applications. We also demonstrate the spatial versatility and self-aligned properties of this technique by introducing a novel graphene thermopile photodetector.
  • Determination and characterization of criticality in two-dimensional (2D) quantum many-body systems belong to the most important challenges and problems of quantum physics. In this paper we propose an efficient scheme to solve this problem by utilizing the infinite projected entangled pair state (iPEPS), and tensor network (TN) representations. We show that the criticality of a 2D state is faithfully reproduced by the ground state (dubbed as boundary state) of a one-dimensional effective Hamiltonian constructed from its iPEPS representation. We demonstrate that for a critical state the correlation length and the entanglement spectrum of the boundary state are essentially different from those of a gapped iPEPS. This provides a solid indicator that allows to identify the criticality of the 2D state. Our scheme is verified on the resonating valence bond (RVB) states on kagom\'e and square lattices, where the boundary state of the honeycomb RVB is found to be described by a $c=1$ conformal field theory. We apply our scheme also to the ground state of the spin-1/2 XXZ model on honeycomb lattice, illustrating the difficulties of standard variational TN approaches to study the critical ground states. Our scheme is of high versatility and flexibility, and can be further applied to investigate the quantum criticality in many other phenomena, such as finite-temperature and topological phase transitions.
  • Twisted sectors arise naturally in the bosonic higher spin CFTs at their free points, as well as in the associated symmetric orbifolds. We identify the coset representations of the twisted sector states using the description of W_\infty representations in terms of plane partitions. We confirm these proposals by a microscopic null-vector analysis, and by matching the excitation spectrum of these representations with the orbifold prediction.
  • It has recently been argued that the symmetric orbifold theory of T4 is dual to string theory on AdS3 x S3 x T4 at the tensionless point. At this point in moduli space, the theory possesses a very large symmetry algebra that includes, in particular, a $W_\infty$ algebra capturing the gauge fields of a dual higher spin theory. Using conformal perturbation theory, we study the behaviour of the symmetry generators of the symmetric orbifold theory under the deformation that corresponds to switching on the string tension. We show that the generators fall nicely into Regge trajectories, with the higher spin fields corresponding to the leading Regge trajectory. We also estimate the form of the Regge trajectories for large spin, and find evidence for the familiar logarithmic behaviour, thereby suggesting that the symmetric orbifold theory is dual to an AdS background with pure RR flux.
  • We construct Schroedinger-like solutions of the Vasiliev higher spin theory in D>3 dimension. Symmetries of such solutions and the linearised equation of motion for the scalar on such backgrounds are analysed. We further propose Galilean invariant bosonic and fermionic field theories that could be dual to the two parity invariant higher spin theories on the Schroedinger-like background respectively. The discussion is phrased mainly in D=4 dimension, while similar constructions follow straightforwardly in higher dimensions.
  • Graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising materials for broadband and ultrafast photodetection and optical modulation. These optoelectronic capabilities can augment complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices for high-speed and low-power optical interconnects. Here, we demonstrate an on-chip ultrafast photodetector based on a two-dimensional heterostructure consisting of high-quality graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. Coupled to the optical mode of a silicon waveguide, this 2D heterostructure-based photodetector exhibits a maximum responsivity of 0.36 A/W and high-speed operation with a 3 dB cut-off at 42 GHz. From photocurrent measurements as a function of the top-gate and source-drain voltages, we conclude that the photoresponse is consistent with hot electron mediated effects. At moderate peak powers above 50 mW, we observe a saturating photocurrent consistent with the mechanisms of electron-phonon supercollision cooling. This nonlinear photoresponse enables optical on-chip autocorrelation measurements with picosecond-scale timing resolution and exceptionally low peak powers.
  • The symmetric orbifold of K3 is believed to be the CFT dual of string theory on AdS3 x S3 x K3 at the tensionless point. For the case when the K3 is described by the orbifold T4/Z2, we identify a subsector of the symmetric orbifold theory that is dual to a higher spin theory on AdS3. We analyse how the BPS spectrum of string theory can be described from the higher spin perspective, and determine which single-particle BPS states are accounted for by the perturbative higher spin theory.
  • We propose a systematic scheme to reach the properties of two-dimensional (2D) statistical and quantum systems by studying the effective (1+1)-dimensional theory that is constructed from the tensor network representation. On on hand, we discover that the degeneracy of the 2D system can be determined by the purity of the boundary thermal state, which is the density operator of the effective theory at zero (effective) temperature. On the other hand, we find that the gapped (or critical) 2D system leads to a gapped (or critical) effective (1+1)-dimensional theory whose criticality can be accessed by the entanglement entropy $S$ of its ground state dubbed as boundary pure state. We also uncover that for the critical systems, $S$ obeys the same logarithmic law as that found in the critical 1D quantum chains, which reads $S = (\kappa c/6)\log_2 D + const.$, with $c$ the central charge and $\kappa$ a constant related to the scaling property of the correlation length $\xi$ as $\xi \sim D^{\kappa}$. Such a scaling law presents an efficient way to characterize the critical universality class of the original 2D systems. An important implication of our work is that many well-established theories for 1D quantum chains become available for studying 2D systems with the help of the proposed lower dimensional correspondence.
  • Nanoscale and power-efficient electro-optic (EO) modulators are essential components for optical interconnects that are beginning to replace electrical wiring for intra- and inter-chip communications. Silicon-based EO modulators show sufficient figures of merits regarding device footprint, speed, power consumption and modulation depth. However, the weak electro-optic effect of silicon still sets a technical bottleneck for these devices, motivating the development of modulators based on new materials. Graphene, a two-dimensional carbon allotrope, has emerged as an alternative active material for optoelectronic applications owing to its exceptional optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate a high-speed graphene electro-optic modulator based on a graphene-boron nitride (BN) heterostructure integrated with a silicon photonic crystal nanocavity. Strongly enhanced light-matter interaction of graphene in a submicron cavity enables efficient electrical tuning of the cavity reflection. We observe a modulation depth of 3.2 dB and a cut-off frequency of 1.2 GHz.
  • To meet the measurement demands on small-mass radiocarbon (carbon content at 10-6g level) which are becoming increasingly significant. Xi'an-AMS has made improvement to the existing method of sample loading and has upgraded the Cs sputter ion source from the original SO-110 model. In order to study the feasibility of small-mass samples in Xi'an-AMS and evaluate the radiocarbon sample preparation ability using existing routine systems of H2/Fe and Zn/Fe, the small-mass samples prepared by four different methods are tested. They are mass division method, mass dilution method, H2/Fe reduction method and Zn/Fe reduction method. The results show that carbon mass above 25ug can be prepared using the existing Zn/Fe system, but no less than 100ug is required using the existing H2/Fe system, which can be improved. This indicates Xi'an-AMS are now able to analyze small-mass radiocarbon samples.
  • We determine the asymptotic symmetry algebra (for fields of low spin) of the $M\times M$ matrix extended Vasiliev theories on AdS$_3$ and find that it agrees with the $\mathcal{W}$-algebra of their proposed coset duals. Previously it was noticed that for $M=2$ the supersymmetry increases from $\mathcal{N}=2$ to $\mathcal{N}=4$. We study more systematically this type of supersymmetry enhancements and find that, although the higher spin algebra has extended supersymmetry for all $M\geq 2$, the corresponding asymptotic symmetry algebra fails to be superconformal except for $M=2$, when it has large $\mathcal{N}=4$ superconformal symmetry. Moreover, we find that the Vasiliev theories based on $shs^E\! \left( \mathcal{N} \vert 2, \mathbb{R} \right)$ are special cases of the matrix extended higher spin theories, and hence have the same supersymmetry properties.