• The low-energy quasiparticles of Weyl semimetals are a condensed-matter realization of the Weyl fermions introduced in relativistic field theory. Chiral anomaly, the nonconservation of the chiral charge under parallel electric and magnetic fields, is arguably the most important phenomenon of Weyl semimetals and has been explained as an imbalance between the occupancies of the gapless, zeroth Landau levels with opposite chiralities. This widely accepted picture has served as the basis for subsequent studies. Here we report the breakdown of the chiral anomaly in Weyl semimetals in a strong magnetic field based on ab initio calculations. A sizable energy gap that depends sensitively on the direction of the magnetic field may open up due to the mixing of the zeroth Landau levels associated with the opposite-chirality Weyl points that are away from each other in the Brillouin zone. Our study provides a theoretical framework for understanding a wide range of phenomena closely related to the chiral anomaly in topological semimetals, such as magnetotransport, thermoelectric responses, and plasmons, to name a few.
  • Graphene and related two-dimensional materials are promising candidates for atomically thin, flexible, and transparent optoelectronics. In particular, the strong light-matter interaction in graphene has allowed for the development of state-of-the-art photodetectors, optical modulators, and plasmonic devices. In addition, electrically biased graphene on SiO2 substrates can be used as a low-efficiency emitter in the mid-infrared range. However, emission in the visible range has remained elusive. Here we report the observation of bright visible-light emission from electrically biased suspended graphenes. In these devices, heat transport is greatly minimised; thus hot electrons (~ 2800 K) become spatially localised at the centre of graphene layer, resulting in a 1000-fold enhancement in the thermal radiation efficiency. Moreover, strong optical interference between the suspended graphene and substrate can be utilized to tune the emission spectrum. We also demonstrate the scalability of this technique by realizing arrays of chemical-vapour-deposited graphene bright visible-light emitters. These results pave the way towards the realisation of commercially viable large-scale, atomically-thin, flexible and transparent light emitters and displays with low-operation voltage, and graphene-based, on-chip ultrafast optical communications.
  • We have investigated the electronic structure of charged bilayer and trilayer phoshporene using first-principles, density-functional-theory calculations. We find that the effective dielectric constant for an external electric field applied perpendicular to phosphorene layers increases with the charge density and is twice as large as in an undoped system if the electron density is around $5\times10^{13}$cm$^{-2}$. It is known that if few-layer phosphorene is placed under such an electric field, the electron band gap decreases and if the strength of the electric field is further increased, the band gap closes. We show that the electronic screening due to added charge carriers reduces the amount of this reduction in the band gap and increases the critical strength of the electric field for gap closure. If the electron density is around $4\times10^{13}$cm$^{-2}$, for example, this critical field for trilayer phosphorene is 40\% higher than that for a charge-neutral system. The results are directly relevant to experiments on few-layer phosphorene with top and bottom electrical gates and / or with chemical dopants.
  • It was previously believed that the Bloch electronic states of non-magnetic materials with inversion symmetry cannot have finite spin polarizations. However, since the seminal work by Zhang et al. [Nat. Phys. 10, 387-393 (2014)] on local spin polarizations of Bloch states in non-magnetic, centrosymmetric materials, the scope of spintronics has been significantly broadened. Here, we show, using a framework that is universally applicable independent of whether hidden spin polarizations are small (e.g., diamond, Si, Ge, and GaAs) or large (e.g., MoS2 and WSe2), that the corresponding quantity arising from orbital - instead of spin - degrees of freedom, the hidden orbital polarization, is (i) much more abundant in nature since it exists even without spin-orbit coupling and (ii) more fundamental since the interband matrix elements of the site-dependent orbital angular momentum operator determines the hidden spin polarization. We predict that the hidden spin polarization of transition metal dichalcogenides is reduced significantly upon compression. We suggest experimental signatures of hidden orbital polarization from photoemission spectroscopies and demonstrate that the current-induced hidden orbital polarization may play a far more important role than its spin counterpart in antiferromagnetic information technology by calculating the current-driven antiferromagnetism in compressed silicon.
  • Strong charge-spin coupling is found in a layered transition-metal trichalcogenide NiPS3, a van derWaals antiferromagnet, from our study of the electronic structure using several experimental and theoretical tools: spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy, and density-functional calculations. NiPS3 displays an anomalous shift in the optical spectral weight at the magnetic ordering temperature, reflecting a strong coupling between the electronic and magnetic structures. X-ray absorption, photoemission and optical spectra support a self-doped ground state in NiPS3. Our work demonstrates that layered transition-metal trichalcogenide magnets are a useful candidate for the study of correlated-electron physics in two-dimensional magnetic material.
  • Magnetism in two-dimensional materials is not only of fundamental scientific interest but also a promising candidate for numerous applications. However, studies so far, especially the experimental ones, have been mostly limited to the magnetism arising from defects, vacancies, edges or chemical dopants which are all extrinsic effects. Here, we report on the observation of intrinsic antiferromagnetic ordering in the two-dimensional limit. By monitoring the Raman peaks that arise from zone folding due to antiferromagnetic ordering at the transition temperature, we demonstrate that FePS3 exhibits an Ising-type antiferromagnetic ordering down to the monolayer limit, in good agreement with the Onsager solution for two-dimensional order-disorder transition. The transition temperature remains almost independent of the thickness from bulk to the monolayer limit with TN ~118 K, indicating that the weak interlayer interaction has little effect on the antiferromagnetic ordering.
  • Graphene, as a semimetal with the largest known thermal conductivity, is an ideal system to study the interplay between electronic and lattice contributions to thermal transport. While the total electrical and thermal conductivity have been extensively investigated, a detailed first-principles study of its electronic thermal conductivity is still missing. Here, we first characterize the electron-phonon intrinsic contribution to the electronic thermal resistivity of graphene as a function of doping using electronic and phonon dispersions and electron-phonon couplings calculated from first principles at the level of density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory (GW). Then, we include extrinsic electron-impurity scattering using low-temperature experimental estimates. Under these conditions, we find that the in-plane electronic thermal conductivity of doped graphene is ~300 W/mK at room temperature, independently of doping. This result is much larger than expected, and comparable to the total thermal conductivity of typical metals, contributing ~10 % to the total thermal conductivity of bulk graphene. Notably, in samples whose physical or domain sizes are of the order of few micrometers or smaller, the relative contribution coming from the electronic thermal conductivity is more important than in the bulk limit, since lattice thermal conductivity is much more sensitive to sample or grain size at these scales. Last, when electron-impurity scattering effects are included, we find that the electronic thermal conductivity is reduced by 30 to 70 %. We also find that the Wiedemann-Franz law is broadly satisfied at low and high temperatures, but with the largest deviations of 20-50 % around room temperature.
  • We present a theory based on first-principles calculations explaining (i) why the tunability of spin polarizations of photoelectrons from Bi$_2$Se$_3$ (111) depends on the band index and Bloch wavevector of the surface state and (ii) why such tunability is absent in the case of isosymmetric Au (111). The results provide not only an explanation for the recent, puzzling experimental observations but also a guide toward making highly-tunable spin-polarized electron sources from topological insulators.
  • A so-called artificial graphene is an artificial material whose low-energy carriers are described by the massless Dirac equation. Applying a periodic potential with triangular symmetry to a two-dimensional electron gas is one way to make such a material. According to recent experimental results, it is now possible to realize an artificial graphene in the lab and to even apply an additional lateral, one-dimensional periodic potential to it. We name the latter system an artificial graphene superlattice in order to distinguish it from a genuine graphene superlattice made from graphene. In this study, we investigate the electronic structure of artificial graphene superlattices, which exhibit the emergence of energy band gaps, merging and splitting of the Dirac points, etc. Then, from a similar investigation on genuine graphene superlattices, we show that many of these features originate from the coupling between Dirac fermions residing in two different valleys, the intervalley coupling. Furthermore, contrary to previous studies, we find that the effects of intervalley coupling on the electronic structure cannot be ignored no matter how long the spatial period of the superlattice is.
  • The ab initio $GW$ method is considered as the most accurate approach for calculating the band gaps of semiconductors and insulators. Yet its application to transition metal oxides (TMOs) has been hindered by the failure of traditional approximations developed for conventional semiconductors. In this work, we examine the effects of these approximations on the values of band gaps for ZnO, Cu$_2$O, and TiO$_2$. In particular, we explore the origin of the differences between the two widely used plasmon-pole models. Based on the comparison of our results with the experimental data and previously published calculations, we discuss which approximations are suitable for TMOs and why.
  • Electron-phonon coupling in graphene is extensively modeled and simulated from first principles. We find that using an accurate model for the polarizations of the acoustic phonon modes is crucial to obtain correct numerical results. The interactions between electrons and acoustic phonon modes, the gauge field and deformation potential, are calculated at the DFT level in the framework of linear response. The zero-momentum limit of acoustic phonons is interpreted as a strain pattern, allowing the calculation of the acoustic gauge field parameter in the GW approximation. The role of electronic screening on the electron-phonon matrix elements is investigated. We then solve the Boltzmann equation semi-analytically in graphene, including both acoustic and optical phonon scattering. We show that, in the Bloch-Gr\"uneisen and equipartition regimes, the electronic transport is mainly ruled by the unscreened acoustic gauge field, while the contribution due to the deformation potential is negligible and strongly screened. By comparing with experimental data, we show that the contribution of acoustic phonons to resistivity is doping- and substrate-independent. The DFT+GW approach underestimates this contribution to resistivity by about 30 %. Above 270K, the calculated resistivity underestimates the experimental one more severely, the underestimation being larger at lower doping. We show that, beside remote phonon scattering, a possible explanation for this disagreement is the electron-electron interaction that strongly renormalizes the coupling to intrinsic optical-phonon modes. Finally, after discussing the validity of the Matthiessen rule in graphene, we derive simplified analytical solutions of the Boltzmann equation to extract the coupling to acoustic phonons, related to the strain-induced gauge field, directly from experimental data.
  • Electron supercollimation, in which a wavepacket is guided to move undistorted along a selected direction, is a highly desirable property that has yet been realized experimentally. Disorder in general is expected to inhibit supercollimation. Here, we report a counter-intuitive phenomenon of electron supercollimation by disorder in graphene and related Dirac fermion materials. We show that one can use one-dimensional disorder potentials to control electron wavepacket transport. This is distinct from known systems where an electron wavepacket would be further spread by disorder and hindered in the potential fluctuating direction. The predicted phenomenon has significant implications in the understanding and applications of electron transport in Dirac fermion materials.
  • We present a first-principles study of the temperature- and density-dependent intrinsic electrical resistivity of graphene. We use density-functional theory and density-functional perturbation theory together with very accurate Wannier interpolations to compute all electronic and vibrational properties and electron-phonon coupling matrix elements; the phonon-limited resistivity is then calculated within a Boltzmann-transport approach. An effective tight-binding model, validated against first-principles results, is also used to study the role of electron-electron interactions at the level of many-body perturbation theory. The results found are in excellent agreement with recent experimental data on graphene samples at high carrier densities and elucidate the role of the different phonon modes in limiting electron mobility. Moreover, we find that the resistivity arising from scattering with transverse acoustic phonons is 2.5 times higher than that from longitudinal acoustic phonons. Last, high-energy, optical, and zone-boundary phonons contribute as much as acoustic phonons to the intrinsic electrical resistivity even at room temperature and become dominant at higher temperatures.
  • Recently discovered materials called three-dimensional topological insulators constitute examples of symmetry protected topological states in the absence of applied magnetic fields and cryogenic temperatures. A hallmark characteristic of these non-magnetic bulk insulators is the protected metallic electronic states confined to the material's surfaces. Electrons in these surface states are spin polarized with their spins governed by their direction of travel (linear momentum), resulting in a helical spin texture in momentum space. Spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) has been the only tool capable of directly observing this central feature with simultaneous energy, momentum, and spin sensitivity. By using an innovative photoelectron spectrometer with a high-flux laser-based light source, we discovered another surprising property of these surface electrons which behave like Dirac fermions. We found that the spin polarization of the resulting photoelectrons can be fully manipulated in all three dimensions through selection of the light polarization. These surprising effects are due to the spin-dependent interaction of the helical Dirac fermions with light, which originates from the strong spin-orbit coupling in the material. Our results illustrate unusual scenarios in which the spin polarization of photoelectrons is completely different from the spin state of electrons in the originating initial states. The results also provide the basis for a novel source of highly spin-polarized electrons with tunable polarization in three dimensions.
  • Accurate and efficient approaches to predict the optical properties of organic semiconducting compounds could accelerate the search for efficient organic photovoltaic materials. Nevertheless, predicting the optical properties of organic semiconductors has been plagued by the inaccuracy or computational cost of conventional first-principles calculations. In this work, we demonstrate that orbital-dependent density-functional theory based upon Koopmans' condition [Phys. Rev. B 82, 115121 (2010)] is apt at describing donor and acceptor levels for a wide variety of organic molecules, clusters, and oligomers within a few tenths of an electron-volt relative to experiment, which is comparable to the predictive performance of many-body perturbation theory methods at a fraction of the computational cost.
  • We show that the degree of spin polarization of photoelectrons from the surface states of topological insulators is 100% if fully-polarized light is used as in typical photoemission measurements, and hence can be significantly "higher" than that of the initial state. Further, the spin orientation of these photoelectrons in general can also be very different from that of the initial surface state and is controlled by the photon polarization; a rich set of predicted phenomena have recently been confirmed by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission experiments.
  • Ever since the novel quantum Hall effect in bilayer graphene was discovered, and explained by a Berry phase of 2pi [K. S. Novoselov et al., "Unconventional quantum Hall effect and Berry's phase of 2pi in bilayer graphene", Nature Phys. 2, 177 (2006)], it has been widely accepted that the low-energy electronic wavefunction in this system is described by a non-trivial Berry phase of 2pi, different from the zero phase of a conventional two-dimensional electron gas. Here, we show that (i) the relevant Berry phase for bilayer graphene is not different from that for a conventional two-dimensional electron gas (as expected, given that Berry phase is only meaningful modulo 2pi) and that (ii) what is actually observed in the quantum Hall measurements is not the absolute value of the Berry phase but the pseudospin winding number.
  • Quantum phases provide us with important information for understanding the fundamental properties of a system. However, the observation of quantum phases, such as Berry's phase and the sign of the matrix element of the Hamiltonian between two non-equivalent localized orbitals in a tight-binding formalism, has been challenged by the presence of other factors, e.g., dynamic phases and spin/valley degeneracy, and the absence of methodology. Here, we report a new way to directly access these quantum phases, through polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), using graphene as a prototypical two-dimensional material. We show that the momentum- and polarization-dependent spectral intensity provides direct measurements of (i) the phase of the band wavefunction and (ii) the sign of matrix elements for non-equivalent orbitals. Upon rotating light polarization by \pi/2, we found that graphene with a Berry's phase of n\pi (n=1 for single- and n=2 for double-layer graphene for Bloch wavefunction in the commonly used form) exhibits the rotation of ARPES intensity by \pi/n, and that ARPES signals reveal the signs of the matrix elements in both single- and double-layer graphene. The method provides a new technique to directly extract fundamental quantum electronic information on a variety of materials.
  • Functionals that strive to correct for such self-interaction errors, such as those obtained by imposing the Perdew-Zunger self-interaction correction or the generalized Koopmans' condition, become orbital dependent or orbital-density dependent, and provide a very promising avenue to go beyond density-functional theory, especially when studying electronic, optical and dielectric properties, charge-transfer excitations, and molecular dissociations. Unlike conventional density functionals, these functionals are not invariant under unitary transformations of occupied electronic states, which leave the total charge density intact, and this added complexity has greatly inhibited both their development and their practical applicability. Here, we first recast the minimization problem for non-unitary invariant energy functionals into the language of ensemble density-functional theory, decoupling the variational search into an inner loop of unitary transformations that minimize the energy at fixed orbital subspace, and an outer-loop evolution of the orbitals in the space orthogonal to the occupied manifold. Then, we show that the potential energy surface in the inner loop is far from convex parabolic in the early stages of the minimization and hence minimization schemes based on these assumptions are unstable, and present an approach to overcome such difficulty. The overall formulation allows for a stable, robust, and efficient variational minimization of non-unitary-invariant functionals, essential to study complex materials and molecules, and to investigate the bulk thermodynamic limit, where orbitals converge typically to localized Wannier functions. In particular, using maximally localized Wannier functions as an initial guess can greatly reduce the computational costs needed to reach the energy minimum while not affecting or improving the convergence efficiency.
  • The Landau-Fermi liquid picture for quasiparticles assumes that charge carriers are dressed by many-body interactions, forming one of the fundamental theories of solids. Whether this picture still holds for a semimetal like graphene at the neutrality point, i.e., when the chemical potential coincides with the Dirac point energy, is one of the long-standing puzzles in this field. Here we present such a study in quasi-freestanding graphene by using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We see the electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions go through substantial changes when the semimetallic regime is approached, including renormalizations due to strong electron-electron interactions with similarities to marginal Fermi liquid behavior. These findings set a new benchmark in our understanding of many-body physics in graphene and a variety of novel materials with Dirac fermions.
  • We discuss the novel electronic properties of graphene under an external periodic scalar or vector potential, and the analytical and numerical methods used to investigate them. When graphene is subjected to a one-dimensional periodic scalar potential, owing to the linear dispersion and the chiral (pseudospin) nature of the electronic states, the group velocity of its carriers is renormalized highly anisotropically in such a manner that the velocity is invariant along the periodic direction but is reduced the most along the perpendicular direction. Under a periodic scalar potential, new massless Dirac fermions are generated at the supercell Brillouin zone boundaries. Also, we show that if the strength of the applied scalar potential is sufficiently strong, new zero-energy modes may be generated. With the periodic scalar potential satisfying some special conditions, the energy dispersion near the Dirac point becomes quasi one-dimensional. On the other hand, for graphene under a one-dimensional periodic vector potential (resulting in a periodic magnetic field perpendicular to the graphene plane), the group velocity is reduced isotropically and monotonically with the strength of the potential.
  • We show that the low-energy electronic structure of graphene under a one-dimensional inhomogeneous magnetic field can be mapped into that of graphene under an electric field or vice versa. As a direct application of this transformation, we find that the carrier velocity in graphene is isotropically reduced under magnetic fields periodic along one direction with zero average flux. This counterintuitive renormalization has its origin in the pseudospin nature of graphene electronic states and is robust against disorder. In magnetic graphene superlattices with a finite average flux, the Landau level bandwidth at high fields exhibits an unconventional behavior of decreasing with increasing strength of the average magnetic field due to the linear energy dispersion of graphene. As another application of our transformation relation, we show that the transmission probabilities of an electron through a magnetic barrier in graphene can directly be obtained from those through an electrostatic barrier or vice versa.
  • EPW (Electron-Phonon coupling using Wannier functions) is a program written in FORTRAN90 for calculating the electron-phonon coupling in periodic systems using density-functional perturbation theory and maximally-localized Wannier functions. EPW can calculate electron-phonon interaction self-energies, electron-phonon spectral functions, and total as well as mode-resolved electron-phonon coupling strengths. The calculation of the electron-phonon coupling requires a very accurate sampling of electron-phonon scattering processes throughout the Brillouin zone, hence reliable calculations can be prohibitively time-consuming. EPW combines the Kohn-Sham electronic eigenstates and the vibrational eigenmodes provided by the Quantum-ESPRESSO package [1] with the maximally localized Wannier functions provided by the wannier90 package [2] in order to generate electron-phonon matrix elements on arbitrarily dense Brillouin zone grids using a generalized Fourier interpolation. This feature of EPW leads to fast and accurate calculations of the electron-phonon coupling, and enables the study of the electron-phonon coupling in large and complex systems.
  • Recent measurements have shown that a continuously tunable bandgap of up to 250 meV can be generated in biased bilayer graphene [Y. Zhang et al., Nature 459, 820 (2009)], opening up pathway for possible graphene-based nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices operating at room temperature. Here, we show that the optical response of this system is dominated by bound excitons. The main feature of the optical absorbance spectrum is determined by a single symmetric peak arising from excitons, a profile that is markedly different from that of an interband transition picture. Under laboratory conditions, the binding energy of the excitons may be tuned with the external bias going from zero to several tens of meV's. These novel strong excitonic behaviors result from a peculiar, effective ``one-dimensional'' joint density of states and a continuously-tunable bandgap in biased bilayer graphene. Moreover, we show that the electronic structure (level degeneracy, optical selection rules, etc.) of the bound excitons in a biased bilayer graphene is markedly different from that of a two-dimensional hydrogen atom because of the pseudospin physics.
  • Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a powerful experimental technique for directly probing electron dynamics in solids. The energy vs. momentum dispersion relations and the associated spectral broadenings measured by ARPES provide a wealth of information on quantum many-body interaction effects. In particular, ARPES allows studies of the Coulomb interaction among electrons (electron-electron interactions) and the interaction between electrons and lattice vibrations (electron-phonon interactions). Here, we report ab initio simulations of the ARPES spectra of graphene including both electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions on the same footing. Our calculations reproduce some of the key experimental observations related to many-body effects, including the indication of a mismatch between the upper and lower halves of the Dirac cone.