• The band structure of an Si inverse diamond structure whose lattice point shape was vacant regular octahedrons, was calculated using plane wave expansion method. A complete photonic band gap was theoretically confirmed at around 0.4 THz. It is said that three-dimensional photonic crystals have no polarization anisotropy in photonic band gap (stop gap, stop band) of high symmetry points in normal incidence. However, it was experimentally confirmed that the polarization orientation of a reflected wave was different from that of an incident wave, [I$(X,Y)$], where $(X,Y)$ is the coordinate system fixed in the photonic crystal. It was studied on a plane (001) at around X point's photonic band gap (0.36 $-$ 0.44 THz) for incident wave direction [001] by rotating a sample in the plane (001), relatively. The polarization orientation of the reflected wave was parallel to that of the incident wave when that of the incident wave was I(1, 1) or I(1, $-$1). In contrast, the former was perpendicular to the latter when that of the incident wave was I(1, 0) or I(0, $-$1) at around 0.38 THz. As far as the photonic crystal in this work is concerned, method of resolution and synthesis of the incident polarization vector is not able to apply to the analyses of rotation of the measured reflected spectra in appearance.
  • A Si inverse diamond structure whose lattice point shape was vacant regular octahedrons had a complete photonic band gap at around 0.4 THz and X point's photonic band gap (0.36$-$0.44 THz) by plane wave expansion method. It is said that three-dimensional photonic crystals have no polarization anisotropy in photonic band gap (stop gap, stop band) of high symmetry points in normal incidence. Experimental results, however, confirmed that the polarization orientation of a reflected light was different from that of an incident light. The direction of the incident light was [001] ($\Gamma$-X direction). The polarization orientation of an electrical field was parallel to the surface (001) of the photonic crystal and was set in the orientation defined as $\theta$ degree. $\theta$ was 0$^\circ$ to 90$^\circ$ per 15$^\circ$. A sample was rotated in plane (001) instead of the incident light, relatively. The polarization orientation of the reflected light was parallel to that of the incident light for $\theta$ = 0$^\circ$ and 90$^\circ$, in contrast, the former was perpendicular to the latter for $\theta$ = 45$^\circ$ in the vicinity of 0.42 THz. For an intermediate $\theta$, the former was an intermediate orientation. As far as the photonic crystal in this work is concerned, these phenomena don't apparently apply to physical and optical basic rules.