• We present a colloidal synthesis strategy for lead halide nanosheets with a thickness of far below 100 nm. Due to the layered structure and the synthesis parameters the crystals of PbI2 are initially composed of many polytypes. We propose a mechanism which gives insight into the chemical process of the PbI2 formation. Further, we found that the crystal structure changes with increasing reaction temperature or by performing the synthesis for longer time periods changing for the final 2H structure. In addition, we demonstrate a route to prepare nanosheets of lead bromide as well as lead chloride in a similar way. Lead halides can be used as a detector material for high-energy photons including gamma and X-rays.
  • Colloidally synthesized nanomaterials are among the promising candidates for future electronic devices due to their simplicity and the inexpensiveness of their production. Specifically, colloidal nanosheets are of great interest since they are conveniently producible through the colloidal approach while having the advantages of two-dimensionality. In order to employ these materials, according transistor behavior should be adjustable and of high performance. We show that the transistor performance of colloidal lead sulfide nanosheets is tunable by altering the surface passivation, the contact metal, or by exposing them to air. We found that adding halide ions to the synthesis leads to an improvement of the conductivity, the field-effect mobility, and the on/off ratio of these transistors by passivating their surface defects. Superior n-type behavior with a field-effect mobility of 248 cm^2V^-1s^-1 and an on/off ratio of 4x10^6 is achieved. The conductivity of these stripes can be changed from n-type to p-type by altering the contact metal and by adding oxygen to the working environment. As a possible solution for the post-Moore era, realizing new high quality semiconductors such as colloidal materials is crucial. In this respect, our results can provide new insights which helps to accelerate their optimization for potential applications.
  • In this review, we highlight the role of halogenated compounds in the colloidal synthesis of nanostructured semiconductors. Halogen-containing metallic salts used as precursors and halogenated hydrocarbons used as ligands allow stabilizing different shapes and crystal phases, and enable the formation of colloidal systems with different dimensionality. We summarize recent reports on the tremendous influence of these compounds on the physical properties of nanocrystals, like field-effect mobility and solar cell performance and outline main analytical methods for the nanocrystal surface control.
  • Poly (triazine imide) (PTI) is a material belonging to the group of carbon nitrides and has shown to have competitive properties compared to melon or g-C3N4, especially in photocatalysis. As most of the carbon nitrides PTI is usually synthesized by thermal or hydrothermal approaches. We present and discuss an alternative synthesis for PTI which exhibits a pH dependent solubility in aqueous solutions. This synthesis is based on the formation of radicals during electrolysis of an aqueous melamine solution, coupling of resulting melamine radicals and the final formation of PTI. We applied different characterization techniques to identify PTI as the product of this reaction and report the first liquid state NMR experiments on a triazine-based carbon nitride. We show that PTI has a relatively high specific surface area and a pH dependent adsorption of charged molecules. This tunable adsorption has a significant influence on the photocatalytic properties of PTI which we investigated in dye degradation experiments.
  • Single-electron transistors would represent an approach for less power consuming microelectronic devices if room-temperature operation and industry-compatible fabrication were possible. We present a concept based on stripes of small, self-assembled, colloidal, metal nanoparticles on a back-gate device architecture which leads to well-defined and well-controllable transistor characteristics. This Coulomb transistor has three main advantages: By employing the scalable Langmuir-Blodgett method we combine high-quality chemically synthesized metal nanoparticles with standard lithography techniques. The resulting transistors show on/off ratios above 90 %, reliable and sinusoidal Coulomb oscillations and room-temperature operation. Furthermore, this concept allows for versatile tuning of the device properties like Coulomb-energy gap, threshold voltage, as well as period, position and strength of the oscillations.
  • Ultrathin two-dimensional nanosheets raise a rapidly increasing interest due to their unique dimensionality-dependent properties. Most of the two-dimensional materials are obtained by exfoliation of layered bulk materials or are grown on substrates by vapor deposition methods. To produce free-standing nanosheets, solution-based colloidal methods are emerging as promising routes. In this work, we demonstrate ultrathin CdSe nanosheets with controllable size, shape and phase. The key of our approach is the use of halogenated alkanes as additives in a hot-injection synthesis. Increasing concentrations of bromoalkanes can tune the shape from sexangular to quadrangular to triangular and the phase from zinc blende to wurtzite. Geometry and crystal structure evolution of the nanosheets take place in the presence of halide ions, acting as cadmium complexing agents and as surface X-type ligands, according to mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Our experimental findings show that the degree of these changes depends on the molecular structure of the halogen alkanes and the type of halogen atom.
  • Employing the spin degree of freedom of charge carriers offers the possibility to extend the functionality of conventional electronic devices, while colloidal chemistry can be used to synthesize inexpensive and tuneable nanomaterials. In order to benefit from both concepts, Rashba spin-orbit interaction has been investigated in colloidal lead sulphide nanosheets by electrical measurements on the circular photo-galvanic effect. Lead sulphide nanosheets possess rock salt crystal structure, which is centrosymmetric. The symmetry can be broken by quantum confinement, asymmetric vertical interfaces and a gate electric field leading to Rashba-type band splitting in momentum space at the M points, which results in an unconventional selection mechanism for the excitation of the carriers. The effect, which is supported by simulations of the band structure using density functional theory, can be tuned by the gate electric field and by the thickness of the sheets. Spin-related electrical transport phenomena in colloidal materials open a promising pathway towards future inexpensive spintronic devices.
  • There is a strong interest to attach nanoparticles non-covalently to one-dimensional systems like boron nitride nanotubes to form composites. The combination of those materials might be used for catalysis, in solar cells, or for water splitting. Additionally, the fundamental aspect of charge transfer between the components can be studied in such systems. We report on the synthesis and characterization of nanocomposites based on semiconductor nanoparticles attached directly and non-covalently to boron nitride nanotubes. Boron nitride nanotubes were simply integrated into the colloidal synthesis of the corresponding nanoparticles. With PbSe, CdSe, and ZnO nanoparticles a wide range of semiconductor bandgaps from the near infrared to the ultra violet range was covered. A high surface coverage of the boron nitride nanotubes with these semiconducting nanoparticles was achieved, while it was found that a similar in-situ approach with metallic nanoparticles does not lead to proper attachment. In addition, possible models for the underlying attachment mechanisms of all investigated nanoparticles are presented. To emphasize the new possibilities that boron nitride nanotubes offer as a support material for semiconductor nanoparticles we investigated the fluorescence of BN-CdSe composites. In contrast to CdSe nanoparticles attached to carbon nanotubes, where the fluorescence is quenched, particles attached to boron nitride nanotubes remain fluorescent. With our versatile approaches we expand the library of BN-nanoparticle composites that present an interesting, electronically non-interacting complement to the widely applied carbon nanotube-nanoparticle composite materials.
  • Editorial for the Special Issue of "Zeitschrift fuer Physikalische Chemie" on "Hierarchical Colloidal Nanostructures"
  • Two-dimensional colloidal nanosheets represent very attractive optoelectronic materials. They combine good lateral conductivity with solution-processability and geometry-tunable electronic properties. In case of PbS nanosheets, so far the synthesis was driven by the addition of chloroalkanes as coligands. Here, we demonstrate how to synthesize two-dimensional lead sulfide nanostructures using other halogen alkanes and primary amines. Further, we show that at a reaction temperature of 170C a coligand is not even necessary, and the only ligand, oleic acid, controls the anisotropic growth of the two-dimensional structures and using thiourea as sulfide source, nanosheets with lateral dimensions of over 10 microns are possible.
  • Metallic nanoparticles offer possibilities to build basic electric devices with new functionality and improved performance. Due to the small volume and the resulting low self-capacitance, each single nanoparticle exhibits a high charging energy. Thus, a Coulomb-energy gap emerges during transport experiments that can be shifted by electric fields, allowing for charge transport whenever energy levels of neighboring particles match. Hence, the state of the device changes sequentially between conducting and non-conducting instead of just one transition from conducting to pinch-off as in semiconductors. To exploit this behavior for field-effect transistors, it is necessary to use uniform nanoparticles in ordered arrays separated by well-defined tunnel barriers. In this work, CoPt nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution are synthesized by colloidal chemistry. These particles are deposited via the scalable Langmuir-Blodgett technique as ordered, homogeneous monolayers onto Si/SiO2 substrates with pre-patterned gold electrodes. The resulting nanoparticle arrays are limited to stripes of adjustable lengths and widths. In such a defined channel with a limited number of conduction paths the current can be controlled precisely by a gate voltage. Clearly pronounced Coulomb oscillations are observed up to temperatures of 150 K. Using such systems as field-effect transistors yields unprecedented oscillating current modulations with on/off-ratios of around 70 %.
  • Controlling anisotropy in nanostructures is a challenging but rewarding task since confinement in one or more dimensions influences the physical and chemical properties of the items decisively. In particular, semiconducting nanostructures can be tailored to gain optimized properties to work as transistors or absorber material in solar cells. We demonstrate that the shape of colloidal lead sulfide nanostructures can be tuned from spheres to stripes to sheets by means of the precursor concentrations, the concentration of a chloroalkane co-ligand and the synthesis temperature. All final structures still possess at least one dimension in confinement. Electrical transport measurements complement the findings.
  • Highly sensitive and fast photodetector devices with CdSe quantum nanowires as active elements have been developed exploiting the advantages of electro- and wet-chemical routes. Bismuth nanoparticles electrochemically synthesized directly onto interdigitating platinum electrodes serve as catalysts in the following solution-liquid-solid synthesis of quantum nanowires directly on immersed substrates under mild conditions at low temperature. This fast and simple preparation process leads to a photodetector device with a film of nanowires of limited thickness bridging the electrode gaps, in which a high fraction of individual nanowires are electrically contacted and can be exposed to light at the same time. The high sensitivity of the photodetector device can be expressed by its on/off-ratio or its photosensitivity of more than 107 over a broad wavelength range up to about 700 nm. The specific detectivity and responsivity are determined to D* = 4*10^13 Jones and R = 0.32 A/W, respectively. The speed of the device reflects itself in a 3 dB frequency above 1 MHz corresponding to rise and fall times below 350 ns. The remarkable combination of a high sensitivity and a fast response is attributed to depletion regions inside the nanowires, tunnel-junction barriers between nanowires, as well as Schottky contacts at the electrodes, where all these features are strongly influenced by the number of photo generated charge carriers.
  • Solution-processable, two-dimensional semiconductors are promising optoelectronic materials which could find application in low-cost solar cells. Lead sulfide nanocrystals raised attention since the effective band gap can be adapted over a wide range by electronic confinement and observed multi-exciton generation promises higher efficiencies. We report on the influence of the contact metal work function on the properties of transistors based on individual two-dimensional lead sulfide nanosheets. Using palladium we observed mobilities of up to 31 cm2/Vs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that asymmetrically contacted nanosheets show photovoltaic effect and that the nanosheets' height has a decisive impact on the device performance. Nanosheets with a thickness 5.4 nm contacted with platinum and titanium show a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.94 % (EQE 75.70 %). The results underline the high hopes put on such materials.
  • Two-dimensional, solution-processable semiconductor materials are anticipated to be used in low-cost electronic applications, such as transistors and solar cells. Here, lead sulfide nanosheets with a lateral size of several microns are synthesized and it is shown how their height can be tuned by the variation of the ligand concentrations. As a consequence of the adjustability of the nanosheets' height between 2 to more than 20 nm charge carriers are in confinement, which has a decisive impact on their electronic properties. This is demonstrated by their use as conduction channel in a field-effect transistor. The experiments show that the performance in terms of current, On/Off ratio, and sub-threshold swing is tunable over a large range.
  • Colloidal lead sulfide is a versatile material with great opportunities to tune the bandgap by electronic confinement and to adapt the optical and electrical properties to the target application. We present a new and simple synthetic route to control size and shape of PbS nanoparticles. Increasing concentrations of explicitly added acetic acid are used to tune the shape of PbS nanoparticles from quasi-spherical particles via octahedrons to six-armed stars. The presence of acetate changes the intrinsic surface energies of the different crystal facets and enables the growth along the <100> direction. Furthermore, the presence of 1,2-dichloroethane alters the reaction kinetics, which results in smaller nanoparticles with a narrower size distribution.
  • Thin films prepared of semiconductor nanoparticles are promising for low-cost electronic applications such as transistors and solar cells. One hurdle for their breakthrough is their notoriously low conductivity. To address this, we precisely decorate CdSe nanoparticles with platinum domains of one to three nanometers in diameter by a facile and robust seeded growth method. We demonstrate the transition from semiconductor to metal dominated conduction in monolayered films. By adjusting the platinum content in such solution-processable hybrid, oligomeric nanoparticles the dark currents through deposited arrays become tunable while maintaining electronic confinement and photoconductivity. Comprehensive electrical measurements allow determining the reigning charge transport mechanisms.
  • Halogen compounds are capable of playing an important role in the manipulation of nanoparticle shapes and properties. In a new approach, we examined the shape evolution of CdSe nanorods to hexagonal pyramids in a hot-injection synthesis under the influence of halogenated additives in the form of organic chlorine, bromine and iodine compounds. Supported by DFT calculations, this shape evolution is explained as a result of X-type ligand coordination to sloped and flat Cd-rich facets and an equilibrium shape strongly influenced by halides. Synchrotron XPS measurements and TXRF results show that the shape evolution is accompanied by a modification in the chemical composition of the ligand sphere. Our experimental results suggest that the molecular structure of the halogenated compound is related to the degree of the effect on both rod growth and further shape evolution. This presents a new degree of freedom in nanoparticle shape control and highlights the role of additives in nanoparticle synthesis and their possible in situ formation of ligands.
  • We present a facile and safe ligand exchange method for readily synthesized CuInSe2 (CIS) and CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 (CIGS) nanocrystals (NCs) from oleylamine to 1-ethyl-5-thiotetrazole which preserves the colloidal stability of the chalcopyrite structure. 1-ethyl-5-thiotetrazole as thermally degradable ligand is adapted for the first time for trigonal pyramidal CIS NCs (18 nm), elongated CIS NCs (9 nm) and CIGS NCs (6 nm). The exchanged NC solutions are spin-coated onto Si/SiO2 substrates with predefined gold electrodes to yield ordered NC thin films. These films are thermally annealed at 260 C to completely remove 1-ethyl-5-thiotetrazol leaving virtually bare NC surfaces. We measure the current-voltage characteristics of the NC solids prior to ligand thermolysis in the dark and under illumination and after thermolysis of the ligand in the same manner. The conductivity of trigonal pyramidal CIS NCs increases by four orders of magnitude from 1.4*10E-9 S/cm in the dark to 1.4*10E-5 S/cm for ligand-free illuminated NC films. Elongated CIS NC films show an increase by three orders of magnitude and CIGS NC films exhibit improved conductivity by two orders of magnitude. The degree of conductivity enhancement thereby depends on the NC size accentuating the role of trap-states and internal grain boundaries in ligand-free NC solids for electrical transport. Our approach offers for the first time the possibility to address chalcopyrite materials' electrical properties in a virtually ligand-free state.
  • A review of nanostructured materials synthesized by colloidal chemistry for electronic applications
  • The supramolecular interaction between individual singlewall carbon nanotubes and a functional organic material based on tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) is investigated by means of electric transport measurements in field effect transistor configuration as well as by NIR absorption spectroscopy. The results clearly point to a charge transfer interaction in which the adsorbed molecule serves as electron acceptor for the nanotubes through its pyrene units. Exposure to iodine vapors enhances this effect. The comparison with pristine carbon nanotube field effect transistor devices demonstrates the possibility to exploit charge transfer interactions taking place in supramolecular assemblies in which a mediator unit is used to transduce and enhance an external signal.
  • Two-dimensional materials are considered for future quantum devices and are usually produced by extensive methods like molecular beam epitaxy. We report on the fabrication of field-effect transistors using individual ultra-thin lead sulfide nanostructures with lateral dimensions in the micrometer range and a height of a few nanometers as conductive channel produced by a comparatively fast, inexpensive, and scalable colloidal chemistry approach. Contacted with gold electrodes, such devices exhibit p-type behavior and temperature-dependent photoconductivity. Trap states play a crucial role in the conduction mechanism. The performance of the transistors is among the ones of the best devices based on colloidal nanostructures.
  • We demonstrate that by means of a local top-gate current oscillations can be observed in extended, monolayered films assembled from monodisperse metal nanocrystals -- realizing transistor function. The oscillations in this metal-based system are due to the occurrence of a Coulomb energy gap in the nanocrystals which is tunable via the nanocrystal size. The nanocrystal assembly by the Langmuir-Blodgett method yields homogeneous monolayered films over vast areas. The dielectric oxide layer protects the metal nanocrystal field-effect transistors from oxidation and leads to stable function for months. The transistor function can be reached due to the high monodispersity of the nanocrystals and the high super-crystallinity of the assembled films. Due to the fact that the film consists of only one monolayer of nanocrystals and all nanocrystals are simultaneously in the state of Coulomb blockade the energy levels can be influenced efficiently (limited screening).
  • The frictional properties of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are studied by sliding an atomic force microscopy tip across and along its principle axis. This direction-dependent frictional behavior is found to correlate strongly with the presence of structural defects, surface chemistry, and CNT chirality. This study shows that it is experimentally possible to tune the frictional/adhesion properties of a CNT by controlling the CNT structure and surface chemistry, as well as use friction force to predict its structural and chemical properties.
  • We report on the measurement of the effective radial modulus of multiwalled Boron Nitride nanotubes with external radii in the range 3.7 to 36 nm and number of layers in between 5 and 48. These Boron Nitride nanotubes are radially much stiffer than previously reported thinner and smaller Boron Nitride nanotubes. Here, we show the key role of the morphology of the nanotubes in determining their radial rigidity, in particular we find that the external and internal radii, R_ext and R_int, have a stronger influence on the radial modulus than the NT's thickness, t. We find that the effective radial modulus decreases nonlinearly with 1/R_ext until reaching, for a large number of layers and a large radius, the transverse elastic modulus of bulk hexagonal-Boron Nitride.