• Strong gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters has become a powerful tool for probing the high-redshift Universe, magnifying distant and faint background galaxies. Reliable strong lensing (SL) models are crucial for determining the intrinsic properties of distant, magnified sources and for constructing their luminosity function. We present here the first SL analysis of MACS J0308.9+2645 and PLCK G171.9-40.7, two massive galaxy clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope in the framework of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS). We use the Light-Traces-Mass modeling technique to uncover sets of multiply imaged galaxies and constrain the mass distribution of the clusters. Our SL analysis reveals that both clusters have particularly large Einstein radii ($\theta_E>30"$ for a source redshift of $z_s=2$), providing fairly large areas with high magnifications, useful for high-redshift galaxy searches ($\sim2$ arcmin$^{2}$ with $\mu>5$ to $\sim1$ arcmin$^{2}$ with $\mu>10$, similar to a typical \textit{Hubble Frontier Fields} cluster). We also find that MACS J0308.9+2645 hosts a promising, apparently bright (J$\sim23.2-24.6$ AB), multiply imaged high-redshift candidate at $z\sim6.4$. These images are amongst the brightest high-redshift candidates found in RELICS. Our mass models, including magnification maps, are made publicly available for the community through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.
  • Massive foreground galaxy clusters magnify and distort the light of objects behind them, permitting a view into both the extremely distant and intrinsically faint galaxy populations. We present here the z ~ 6 - 8 candidate high-redshift galaxies from the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS), a Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope survey of 41 massive galaxy clusters spanning an area of ~200 arcmin^2. These clusters were selected to be excellent lenses and we find similar high-redshift sample sizes and magnitude distributions as CLASH. We discover 321 candidate galaxies with photometric redshifts between z ~ 6 to z ~ 8, including extremely bright objects with H-band magnitudes of m_AB ~ 23 mag. As a sample, the observed (lensed) magnitudes of these galaxies are among the brightest known at z> 6, comparable to much wider, blank-field surveys. RELICS demonstrates the efficiency of using strong gravitational lenses to produce high-redshift samples in the epoch of reionization. These brightly observed galaxies are excellent targets for follow-up study with current and future observatories, including the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • Strong gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters magnifies background galaxies, enhancing our ability to discover statistically significant samples of galaxies at z>6, in order to constrain the high-redshift galaxy luminosity functions. Here, we present the first five lens models out of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS) Hubble Treasury Program, based on new HST WFC3/IR and ACS imaging of the clusters RXC J0142.9+4438, Abell 2537, Abell 2163, RXC J2211.7-0349, and ACT-CLJ0102-49151. The derived lensing magnification is essential for estimating the intrinsic properties of high-redshift galaxy candidates, and properly accounting for the survey volume. We report on new spectroscopic redshifts of multiply imaged lensed galaxies behind these clusters, which are used as constraints, and detail our strategy to reduce systematic uncertainties due to lack of spectroscopic information. In addition, we quantify the uncertainty on the lensing magnification due to statistical and systematic errors related to the lens modeling process, and find that in all but one cluster, the magnification is constrained to better than 20% in at least 80% of the field of view, including statistical and systematic uncertainties. The five clusters presented in this paper span the range of masses and redshifts of the clusters in the RELICS program. We find that they exhibit similar strong lensing efficiencies to the clusters targeted by the Hubble Frontier Fields within the WFC3/IR field of view. Outputs of the lens models are made available to the community through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes
  • We present a strong-lensing analysis of four massive galaxy clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope in the framework of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS). We use a Light-Traces-Mass modeling technique to uncover sets of multiply imaged galaxies, and constrain the mass distribution and strong-lensing properties of the clusters. The mass models we present here are the first published for Abell S295 and MACS J0159.8-0849. For Abell 697 (the tenth-highest Sunyaev-Zel'dovich mass cluster in the Planck catalog) and MACS J0025.4-1222 (the "baby bullet" cluster), thanks to RELICS data we are able to improve upon previous models. Our analysis for MACS J0025.4-1222 and Abell S295 shows a bimodal mass distribution following the cluster galaxy concentrations, in support of the merger scenarios proposed in previous studies for these clusters. In addition, the updated model for MACS J0025.4-1222 suggests a substantially smaller critical area than previously estimated. For MACS J0159.8-0849 and Abell 697 we find a single peak and relatively regular morphology, suggesting these are fairly relaxed clusters. Despite being smaller and less prominent lenses on average, three of the four clusters we analyze here seem to have lensing strengths similar to the typical Hubble Frontier Fields cluster in terms of the cumulative area above a certain magnification value (e.g., A($\mu>5$) $\sim 1-3$ arcmin$^2$, A($\mu>10$) $\sim 0.5-1.5$ arcmin$^2$), which in part can be attributed to their merging configurations. We make our lens models publicly available through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes, including mass-density, deflection, shear and magnifications maps.
  • The galaxy cluster scaling relations are important for studying baryon physics, structure formation and cosmology. We use a complete sample of 38 richest maxBCG clusters to study the ICM-galaxy scaling relations based on X-ray and optical observations. The clusters are selected from the two largest bins of optical richness in the Planck stacking work with the maxBCG richness N200 > 78. We analyze their Chandra and XMM-Newton data to derive the X-ray properties of the ICM. While the expected cluster temperatures should be scattered around 5-10 keV from the optical richness, the observed range extends to temperatures as low as 1.5 keV. Meanwhile, they follow normal Lx-Tx and Lx-Yx relations, which suggests that they are normal X-ray clusters. Moreover, the observed average Yx is consistent with the expected Yx inferred from the Planck mean staking Ysz in the same two richest bins. However, the scatter of the Lx-N and Yx-N relations are also large and asymmetric with more outliers towards lower Lx or Yx. The mismatch between ICM-galaxy scaling relations can come from several factors, including miscentering, projection, contamination of low mass systems, mass bias and covariance bias. The mismatch is smaller when using a BCG-dominated subsample, with the outliers suffering from the projection problem. Our results suggest that results from blind stacking should be interpreted carefully. We also evaluate the fractions of relaxed and cool core (CC) clusters in our sample. Both are smaller than those from SZ or X-ray selected samples.
  • We present Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the Abell 3391/Abell 3395 intercluster filament. It has been suggested that the galaxy clusters Abell 3395, Abell 3391, and the galaxy group ESO-161 located between the two clusters, are in alignment along a large-scale intercluster filament. We find that the filament is aligned close to the plane of the sky, in contrast to previous results. We find a global projected filament temperature kT = $4.45_{-0.55}^{+0.89}$~keV, electron density $n_e=1.08^{+0.06}_{-0.05} \times 10^{-4}$~cm$^{-3}$, and $M_{\rm gas} = 2.7^{+0.2}_{-0.1} \times 10^{13}$~M$_\odot$. The thermodynamic properties of the filament are consistent with that of intracluster medium (ICM) of Abell 3395 and Abell 3391, suggesting that the filament emission is dominated by ICM gas that has been tidally disrupted during an early stage merger between these two clusters. We present temperature, density, entropy, and abundance profiles across the filament. We find that the galaxy group ESO-161 may be undergoing ram pressure stripping in the low density environment at or near the virial radius of both clusters due to its rapid motion through the filament.
  • The most distant galaxies known are at z~10-11, observed 400-500 Myr after the Big Bang. The few z~10-11 candidates discovered to date have been exceptionally small- barely resolved, if at all, by the Hubble Space Telescope. Here we present the discovery of SPT0615-JD, a fortuitous z~10 (z_phot=9.9+/-0.6) galaxy candidate stretched into an arc over ~2.5" by the effects of strong gravitational lensing. Discovered in the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS) Hubble Treasury program and companion S-RELICS Spitzer program, this candidate has a lensed H-band magnitude of 25.7+/-0.1 AB mag. With a magnification of \mu~4-7 estimated from our lens models, the de-lensed intrinsic magnitude is 27.6+/-0.3 AB mag, and the half-light radius is r_e<0.8 kpc, both consistent with other z>9 candidates. The inferred stellar mass (log [M* /M_Sun]=9.7^{+0.7}_{-0.5}) and star formation rate (\log [SFR/M_Sun yr^{-1}]=1.3^{+0.2}_{-0.3}) indicate that this candidate is a typical star-forming galaxy on the z>6 SFR-M* relation. We note that three independent lens models predict two counterimages, at least one of which should be of a similar magnitude to the arc, but these counterimages are not yet detected. Counterimages would not be expected if the arc were at lower redshift. However, the only spectral energy distributions capable of fitting the Hubble and Spitzer photometry well at lower redshifts require unphysical combinations of z~2 galaxy properties. The unprecedented lensed size of this z~10 candidate offers the potential for the James Webb Space Telescope to study the geometric and kinematic properties of a galaxy observed 500 Myr after the Big Bang.
  • We present results from a deep (200 ks) Chandra observation of the early-type galaxy NGC 4552 (M89) which is falling into the Virgo cluster. Previous shallower X-ray observations of this galaxy showed a remnant gas core, a tail to the South of the galaxy, and twin `horns' attached to the northern edge of the gas core [machacek05a]. In our deeper data, we detect a diffuse, low surface brightness extension to the previously known tail, and measure the temperature structure within the tail. We combine the deep Chandra data with archival XMM-Newton observations to put a strong upper limit on the diffuse emission of the tail out to a large distance (10$\times$the radius of the remnant core) from the galaxy center. In our two previous papers [roediger15a,roediger15b], we presented the results of hydrodynamical simulations of ram pressure stripping specifically for M89 falling into the Virgo cluster and investigated the effect of ICM viscosity. In this paper, we compare our deep data with our specifically tailored simulations and conclude that the observed morphology of the stripped tail in NGC 4552 is most similar to the inviscid models. We conclude that, to the extent the transport processes can be simply modeled as a hydrodynamic viscosity, the ICM viscosity is negligible. More generally, any micro-scale description of the transport processes in the high-$\beta$ plasma of the cluster ICM must be consistent with the efficient mixing observed in the stripped tail on macroscopic scales.
  • Several recent studies have reported different intrinsic correlations between the AGN mid-IR luminosity ($L_{MIR}$) and the rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity ($L_{X}$) for luminous quasars. To understand the origin of the difference in the observed $L_{X}-L_{MIR}$ relations, we study a sample of 3,247 spectroscopically confirmed type 1 AGNs collected from Bo\"{o}tes, XMM-COSMOS, XMM-XXL-North, and the SDSS quasars in the Swift/XRT footprint spanning over four orders of magnitude in luminosity. We carefully examine how different observational constraints impact the observed $L_{X}-L_{MIR}$ relations, including the inclusion of X-ray non-detected objects, possible X-ray absorption in type 1 AGNs, X-ray flux limits, and star formation contamination. We find that the primary factor driving the different $L_{X}-L_{MIR}$ relations reported in the literature is the X-ray flux limits for different studies. When taking these effects into account, we find that the X-ray luminosity and mid-IR luminosity (measured at rest-frame $6\mu m$, or $L_{6\mu m}$) of our sample of type 1 AGNs follow a bilinear relation in the log-log plane: $\log L_X =(0.84\pm0.03)\times\log L_{6\mu m}/10^{45}{\rm erg\;s^{-1}} + (44.60\pm0.01)$ for $L_{6\mu m} < 10^{44.79}{\rm erg\;s^{-1}} $, and $\log L_X = (0.40\pm0.03)\times\log L_{6\mu m}/10^{45}{\rm erg\;s^{-1}} +(44.51\pm0.01)$ for $L_{6\mu m} \geq 10^{44.79}{\rm erg\;s^{-1}} $. This suggests that the luminous type 1 quasars have a shallower $L_{X}-L_{MIR}$ correlation than the approximately linear relations found in local Seyfert galaxies. This result is consistent with previous studies reporting a luminosity-dependent $L_{X}-L_{MIR}$ relation, and implies that assuming a linear $L_{X}-L_{MIR}$ relation to infer the neutral gas column density for X-ray absorption might overestimate the column densities in luminous quasars.
  • X-ray observations show that galaxy clusters have a very large range of morphologies. The most disturbed systems which are good to study how clusters form and grow and to test physical models, may potentially complicate cosmological studies because the cluster mass determination becomes more challenging. Thus, we need to understand the cluster properties of our samples to reduce possible biases. This is complicated by the fact that different experiments may detect different cluster populations. For example, SZ selected cluster samples have been found to include a greater fraction of disturbed systems than X-ray selected samples. In this paper we determined eight morphological parameters for the Planck Early Sunyaev-Zeldovich (ESZ) objects observed with XMM-Newton. We found that two parameters, concentration and centroid-shift, are the best to distinguish between relaxed and disturbed systems. For each parameter we provide the values that allow one to select the most relaxed or most disturbed objects from a sample. We found that there is no mass dependence on the cluster dynamical state. By comparing our results with what was obtained with REXCESS clusters, we also confirm that indeed the ESZ clusters tend to be more disturbed, as found by previous studies.
  • We present the results of a deep Chandra observation of the X-ray bright, moderate cooling flow group NGC 5044 along with the observed correlations between the ionized, atomic, and molecular gas in this system. The Chandra observation shows that the central AGN has undergone two outbursts in the past 100 Myrs, based on the presence of two pairs of nearly bipolar X-ray cavities. The molecular gas and dust within the central 2kpc is aligned with the orientation of the inner pair of bipolar X-ray cavities, suggesting that the most recent AGN outburst had a dynamical impact on the molecular gas. NGC 5044 also hosts many X-ray filaments within the central 8kpc, but there are no obvious connections between the X-ray and H$\alpha$ filaments and the more extended X-ray cavities that were inflated during the prior AGN outburst. Using the linewidth of the blended Fe-L line complex as a diagnostic for multiphase gas, we find that the majority of the multiphase, thermally unstable gas in NGC 5044 is confined within the X-ray filaments. While the cooling time and entropy of the gas within the X-ray filaments are very similar, not all filaments show evidence of gas cooling or an association with Ha emission. We suggest that the various observed properties of the X-ray filaments are suggestive of an evolutionary sequence where thermally unstable gas begins to cool, becomes multiphased, develops Ha emitting plasma, and finally produces cold gas.
  • We derive and compare the fractions of cool-core clusters in the {\em Planck} Early Sunyaev-Zel'dovich sample of 164 clusters with $z \leq 0.35$ and in a flux-limited X-ray sample of 100 clusters with $z \leq 0.30$, using {\em Chandra} observations. We use four metrics to identify cool-core clusters: 1) the concentration parameter: the ratio of the integrated emissivity profile within 0.15 $r_{500}$ to that within $r_{500}$, and 2) the ratio of the integrated emissivity profile within 40 kpc to that within 400 kpc, 3) the cuspiness of the gas density profile: the negative of the logarithmic derivative of the gas density with respect to the radius, measured at 0.04 $r_{500}$, and 4) the central gas density, measured at 0.01 $r_{500}$. We find that the sample of X-ray selected clusters, as characterized by each of these metrics, contains a significantly larger fraction of cool-core clusters compared to the sample of SZ selected clusters (44$\pm$7\% vs. 28$\pm$4\% using the concentration parameter in the 0.15--1.0 $r_{500}$ range, 61$\pm$8\% vs. 36$\pm$5\% using the concentration parameter in the 40--400 kpc range, 64$\pm$8\% vs. 38$\pm$5\% using the cuspiness, and 53$\pm$7\% vs. 39$\pm$5\% using the central gas density). Qualitatively, cool-core clusters are more X-ray luminous at fixed mass. Hence, our X-ray flux-limited sample, compared to the approximately mass-limited SZ sample, is over-represented with cool-core clusters. We describe a simple quantitative model that uses the excess luminosity of cool-core clusters compared to non-cool-core clusters at fixed mass to successfully predict the observed fraction of cool-core clusters in X-ray selected samples.
  • Galaxy-scale bars are expected to provide an effective means for driving material towards the central region in spiral galaxies, and possibly feeding supermassive black holes (BHs). Here we present a statistically-complete study of the effect of bars on average BH accretion. From a well-selected sample of 50,794 spiral galaxies (with M* ~ 0.2-30 x 10^10 Msun) extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Galaxy Zoo 2 project, we separate those sources considered to contain galaxy-scale bars from those that do not. Using archival data taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we identify X-ray luminous (L_X >~ 10^41 erg/s) active galactic nuclei (AGN) and perform an X-ray stacking analysis on the remaining X-ray undetected sources. Through X-ray stacking, we derive a time-averaged look at accretion for galaxies at fixed stellar mass and star formation rate, finding that the average nuclear accretion rates of galaxies with bar structures are fully consistent with those lacking bars (Mdot_acc ~ 3 x 10^-5 Msun/yr). Hence, we robustly conclude that large-scale bars have little or no effect on the average growth of BHs in nearby (z < 0.15) galaxies over gigayear timescales.
  • The rich galaxy cluster Abell 2204 exhibits edges in its X-ray surface brightness at $\sim 65$ and $35 {\rm~ kpc}$ west and east of its center, respectively. The presence of these edges, which were interpreted as sloshing cold fronts, implies that the intracluster medium was recently disturbed. We analyze the properties of the intracluster medium using multiple Chandra observations of Abell 2204. We find a density ratio $n_{\rm in}/n_{\rm out} = 2.05\pm0.05$ and a temperature ratio $T_{\rm out}/T_{\rm in} = 1.91\pm0.27$ (projected, or $1.87\pm0.56$ deprojected) across the western edge, and correspondingly $n_{\rm in}/n_{\rm out} = 1.96\pm0.05$ and $T_{\rm out}/T_{\rm in} =1.45\pm0.15$ (projected, or $1.25\pm0.26$ deprojected) across the eastern edge. These values are typical of cold fronts in galaxy clusters. This, together with the spiral pattern observed in the cluster core, supports the sloshing scenario for Abell 2204. No Kelvin-Helmholtz eddies are observed along the cold front surfaces, indicating that they are effectively suppressed by some physical mechanism. We argue that the suppression is likely facilitated by the magnetic fields amplified in the sloshing motion, and deduce from the measured gas properties that the magnetic field strength should be greater than $24\pm6$ $\mu$G and $32\pm8$ $\mu$G along the west and east cold fronts, respectively.
  • We report Chandra X-ray observations and optical weak-lensing measurements from Subaru/Suprime-Cam images of the double galaxy cluster Abell 2465 (z=0.245). The X-ray brightness data are fit to a beta-model to obtain the radial gas density profiles of the northeast (NE) and southwest (SW) sub-components, which are seen to differ in structure. We determine core radii, central temperatures, the gas masses within $r_{500c}$, and the total masses for the broader NE and sharper SW components assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. The central entropy of the NE clump is about two times higher than the SW. Along with its structural properties, this suggests that it has undergone merging on its own. The weak-lensing analysis gives virial masses for each substructure, which compare well with earlier dynamical results. The derived outer mass contours of the SW sub-component from weak lensing are more irregular and extended than those of the NE. Although there is a weak enhancement and small offsets between X-ray gas and mass centers from weak lensing, the lack of large amounts of gas between the two sub-clusters indicates that Abell 2465 is in a pre-merger state. A dynamical model that is consistent with the observed cluster data, based on the FLASH program and the radial infall model, is constructed, where the subclusters currently separated by ~1.2Mpc are approaching each other at ~2000km/s and will meet in ~0.4Gyr.
  • On the largest scales, the Universe consists of voids and filaments making up the cosmic web. Galaxy clusters are located at the knots in this web, at the intersection of filaments. Clusters grow through accretion from these large-scale filaments and by mergers with other clusters and groups. In a growing number of galaxy clusters, elongated Mpc-size radio sources have been found, so-called radio relics. These relics are thought to trace relativistic electrons in the intracluster plasma accelerated by low-Mach number collisionless shocks generated by cluster-cluster merger events. A long-standing problem is how low-Mach number shocks can accelerate electrons so efficiently to explain the observed radio relics. Here we report on the discovery of a direct connection between a radio relic and a radio galaxy in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3411-3412. This discovery indicates that fossil relativistic electrons from active galactic nuclei are re-accelerated at cluster shocks. It also implies that radio galaxies play an important role in governing the non-thermal component of the intracluster medium in merging clusters.
  • We observed three radio relics in galaxy clusters and one radio relic candidate at 4.85 and 8.35 GHz in total emission and linearly polarized emission with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope and one radio relic candidate in X-rays with the Chandra telescope. The radio spectra of the integrated emission below 8.35 GHz can be well fitted by single power laws for all four relics. The flat spectra (spectral indices of 0.9 and 1.0) for the "Sausage" relic in cluster CIZA J2242+53 and the "Toothbrush" relic in cluster 1RXS 06+42 indicate that models describing the origin of relics have to include effects beyond the assumptions of diffuse shock acceleration. The spectra of the radio relics in ZwCl 0008+52 and in Abell 1612 are steep, as expected from weak shocks (Mach number $\approx 2.4$). We find polarization degrees of more than 50 % in the two prominent Mpc-sized radio relics, the Sausage and the Toothbrush. The high degree of polarization indicates that the magnetic field vectors are almost perfectly aligned along the relic structure. The polarization degrees correspond to Mach numbers of $>2.2$. Polarized emission is also detected in the radio relics in ZwCl 0008+52 and, for the first time, in Abell 1612. Abell 1612 shows a complex X-ray surface brightness distribution, indicating a recent major merger. No Faraday depolarization is detected between 4.85 GHz and 8.35 GHz, except for one component of the Toothbrush relic. Faraday depolarization between 1.38 GHz and 8.35 GHz varies with distance from the center of the host cluster 1RXS 06+42, which can be explained by a decrease in electron density and/or in strength of a turbulent magnetic field. Faraday rotation measures show large-scale gradients along the relics, which cannot be explained by variations in the Milky Way foreground. Large-scale regular fields appear to be present in intergalactic space around galaxy clusters.
  • The Fornax Cluster is the nearest galaxy cluster in the southern sky. NGC 1404 is a bright elliptical galaxy falling through the intracluster medium of the Fornax Cluster. The sharp leading edge of NGC 1404 forms a classical "cold front" that separates 0.6 keV dense interstellar medium and 1.5 keV diffuse intracluster medium. We measure the angular pressure variation along the cold front using a very deep (670\,ksec) {\sl Chandra} X-ray observation. We are taking the classical approach -- using stagnation pressure to determine a substructure's speed -- to the next level by not only deriving a general speed but also directionality which yields the complete velocity field as well as the distance of the substructure directly from the pressure distribution. We find a hydrodynamic model consistent with the pressure jump along NGC 1404's atmosphere measured in multiple directions. The best-fit model gives an inclination of 33$^{\circ}$ and a Mach number of 1.3 for the infall of NGC 1404, in agreement with complementary measurements of the motion of NGC 1404. Our study demonstrates the successful treatment of a highly ionized ICM as ideal fluid flow, in support of the hypothesis that magnetic pressure is not dynamically important over most of the virial region of galaxy clusters.
  • We present results of deep 153 ks Chandra observations of the hot, 11 keV, galaxy cluster associated with the radio galaxy 3C 438. By mapping the morphology of the hot gas and analyzing its surface brightness and temperature distributions, we demonstrate the presence of a merger bow shock. We identify the presence of two jumps in surface brightness and in density located at $\sim$400 kpc and $\sim$800 kpc from the cluster's core. At the position of the inner jump, we detect a factor of $2.3\pm 0.2$ density jump, while at the location of the outer jump, we detect a density drop of a factor of $3.5 \pm 0.7$. Combining this with the temperature distribution within the cluster, we establish that the pressure of the hot gas is continuous at the 400 kpc jump, while there is a factor of $6.2 \pm 2.8$ pressure discontinuity at 800 kpc jump. From the magnitude of the outer pressure discontinuity, using the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions, we determine that the sub-cluster is moving at $M = 2.3\pm 0.5$, or approximately $2600\pm 565$ km/s through the surrounding intracluster medium, creating the conditions for a bow shock. Based on these findings, we conclude that the pressure discontinuity is likely the result of an ongoing major merger between two massive clusters. Since few observations of bow shocks in clusters have been made, this detection can contribute to the study of the dynamics of cluster mergers, which offers insight on how the most massive clusters may have formed.
  • We analyzed deep $Chandra$ ACIS-I exposures of the cluster-scale X-ray halo surrounding the radio source 4C+37.11. This remarkable system hosts the closest resolved pair of super-massive black hole and an exceptionally luminous elliptical galaxy, the likely product of a series of past mergers. We characterize the halo with $r_{500} = 0.95$ Mpc, $M_{500} = (2.5 \pm 0.2) \times 10^{14} \ M_{\rm{\odot}}$, $ kT = 4.6\pm 0.2$ keV, and a gas mass of $M_{\rm g,500} = (2.2 \pm 0.1) \times 10^{13} M_\odot$. The gas mass fraction within $r_{500}$ is $f_{\rm g} = 0.09 \pm 0.01$. The entropy profile shows large non-gravitational heating in the central regions. We see several surface brightness jumps, associated with substantial temperature and density changes, but approximate pressure equilibrium, implying that these are sloshing structures driven by a recent merger. A residual intensity image shows core spiral structure closely matching that seen for the Perseus cluster, although at $z=0.055$ the spiral pattern is less distinct. We infer the most recent merger occurred $1-2$ Gyr ago and that the event that brought the two observed super-massive black holes to the system core is even older. Under that interpretation, this black hole binary pair has, unusually, remained at pc-scale separation for more than 2 Gyr.
  • We present results from recent Suzaku and Chandra X-ray, and MMT optical observations of the strongly merging "double cluster" A1750 out to its virial radius, both along and perpendicular to a putative large-scale structure filament. Some previous studies of individual clusters have found evidence for ICM entropy profiles that flatten at large cluster radii, as compared with the self-similar prediction based on purely gravitational models of hierarchical cluster formation, and gas fractions that rise above the mean cosmic value. Weakening accretion shocks and the presence of unresolved cool gas clumps, both of which are expected to correlate with large scale structure filaments, have been invoked to explain these results. In the outskirts of A1750, we find entropy profiles that are consistent with self-similar expectations, and gas fractions that are consistent with the mean cosmic value, both along and perpendicular to the putative large scale filament. Thus, we find no evidence for gas clumping in the outskirts of A1750, in either direction. This may indicate that gas clumping is less common in lower temperature (kT~4keV), less massive systems, consistent with some (but not all) previous studies of low mass clusters and groups. Cluster mass may therefore play a more important role in gas clumping than dynamical state. Finally, we find evidence for diffuse, cool (<1 keV) gas at large cluster radii (R200) along the filament, which is consistent with the expected properties of the denser, hotter phase of the WHIM.
  • We describe a double-arc-like X-ray structure lying ~15-30" (~0.8-1.7 kpc) south of the NGC 5195 nucleus visible in the merged exposures of long Chandra pointings of M51. The curvature and orientation of the arcs argues for a nuclear origin. The arcs are radially separated by ~15" (~1$ kpc), but are rotated relative to each other by ~30 deg. From an archival image, we find a slender Halpha-emitting region just outside the outer edge of the outer X-ray arc, suggesting that the X-ray-emitting gas plowed up and displaced the Halpha-emitting material from the galaxy core. Star formation may have commenced in that arc. Halpha emission is present at the inner arc, but appears more complex in structure. In contrast to an explosion expected to be azimuthally symmetric, the X-ray arcs suggest a focused outflow. We interpret the arcs as episodic outbursts from the central super-massive black hole (SMBH). We conclude that NGC 5195 represents the nearest galaxy exhibiting on-going, large-scale outflows of gas, in particular, two episodes of a focused outburst of the SMBH. The arcs represent a clear demonstration of feedback.
  • We study the unresolved X-ray emission in three Local Group dwarf elliptical galaxies (NGC 147, NGC 185 and NGC 205) using XMM-Newton observations, which most likely originates from a collection of weak X-ray sources, mainly cataclysmic variables and coronally active binaries. Precise knowledge of this stellar X-ray emission is crucial not only for understanding the relevant stellar astrophysics but also for disentangling and quantifying the thermal emission from diffuse hot gas in nearby galaxies.We find that the integrated X-ray emissivities of the individual dwarf ellipticals agree well with that of the Solar vicinity, supporting an often assumed but untested view that the X-ray emissivity of old stellar populations is quasi-universal in normal galactic environments, in which dynamical effects on the formation and destruction of binary systems are not important. The average X-ray emissivity of the dwarf ellipticals, including M32 studied in the literature, is measured to be $L_{0.5-2\ \rm {keV}}/M_{\ast} = (6.0 \pm 0.5 \pm 1.8) \times 10^{27} \ \rm{erg \ s^{-1} \ M_\odot^{-1}}$. We also compare this value to the integrated X-ray emissivities of Galactic globular clusters and old open clusters and discuss the role of dynamical effects in these dense stellar systems.
  • We studied the physical properties of the intracluster medium in the virialization region of a sample of 320 clusters ($0.056 <z< 1.24$, $kT>3$ keV) in the Chandra archive. With the emission measure profiles from this large sample, the typical gas density, gas slope and gas fraction can be constrained out to and beyond $R_{200}$. We observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond $R_{500}$ with $\beta \sim 0.68$ at $R_{500}$ and $\beta \sim 1$ at $R_{200}$ and beyond. By tracking the direction of the cosmic filaments approximately with the ICM eccentricity, we report that galaxy clusters deviate from spherical symmetry, with only small differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We also did not find evolution of the gas density with redshift, confirming its self-similar evolution. The value of the baryon fraction reaches the cosmic value at $R_{200}$: however, systematics due to non-thermal pressure support and clumpiness might enhance the measured gas fraction, leading to an actual deficit of the baryon budget with respect to the primordial value. This study has important implications for understanding the ICM physics in the outskirts.
  • The presence of hot gaseous coronae around present-day massive spiral galaxies is a fundamental prediction of galaxy formation models. However, our observational knowledge remains scarce, since to date only four gaseous coronae were detected around spirals with massive stellar bodies ($\gtrsim2\times10^{11} \ \rm{M_{\odot}}$). To explore the hot coronae around lower mass spiral galaxies, we utilized Chandra X-ray observations of a sample of eight normal spiral galaxies with stellar masses of $(0.7-2.0)\times10^{11} \ \rm{M_{\odot}}$. Although statistically significant diffuse X-ray emission is not detected beyond the optical radii ($\sim20$ kpc) of the galaxies, we derive $3\sigma$ limits on the characteristics of the coronae. These limits, complemented with previous detections of NGC 1961 and NGC 6753, are used to probe the Illustris Simulation. The observed $3\sigma$ upper limits on the X-ray luminosities and gas masses exceed or are at the upper end of the model predictions. For NGC 1961 and NGC 6753 the observed gas temperatures, metal abundances, and electron density profiles broadly agree with those predicted by Illustris. These results hint that the physics modules of Illustris are broadly consistent with the observed properties of hot coronae around spiral galaxies. However, a shortcoming of Illustris is that massive black holes, mostly residing in giant ellipticals, give rise to powerful radio-mode AGN feedback, which results in under luminous coronae for ellipticals.