• Adaptive optimization algorithms, such as Adam and RMSprop, have shown better optimization performance than stochastic gradient descent (SGD) in some scenarios. However, recent studies show that they often lead to worse generalization performance than SGD, especially for training deep neural networks (DNNs). In this work, we identify the reasons that Adam generalizes worse than SGD, and develop a variant of Adam to eliminate the generalization gap. The proposed method, normalized direction-preserving Adam (ND-Adam), enables more precise control of the direction and step size for updating weight vectors, leading to significantly improved generalization performance. Following a similar rationale, we further improve the generalization performance in classification tasks by regularizing the softmax logits. By bridging the gap between SGD and Adam, we also hope to shed light on why certain optimization algorithms generalize better than others.
  • Nowadays large-scale distributed machine learning systems have been deployed to support various analytics and intelligence services in IT firms. To train a large dataset and derive the prediction/inference model, e.g., a deep neural network, multiple workers are run in parallel to train partitions of the input dataset, and update shared model parameters. In a shared cluster handling multiple training jobs, a fundamental issue is how to efficiently schedule jobs and set the number of concurrent workers to run for each job, such that server resources are maximally utilized and model training can be completed in time. Targeting a distributed machine learning system using the parameter server framework, we design an online algorithm for scheduling the arriving jobs and deciding the adjusted numbers of concurrent workers and parameter servers for each job over its course, to maximize overall utility of all jobs, contingent on their completion times. Our online algorithm design utilizes a primal-dual framework coupled with efficient dual subroutines, achieving good long-term performance guarantees with polynomial time complexity. Practical effectiveness of the online algorithm is evaluated using trace-driven simulation and testbed experiments, which demonstrate its outperformance as compared to commonly adopted scheduling algorithms in today's cloud systems.
  • We study online resource allocation in a cloud computing platform, through a posted pricing mechanism: The cloud provider publishes a unit price for each resource type, which may vary over time; upon arrival at the cloud system, a cloud user either takes the current prices, renting resources to execute its job, or refuses the prices without running its job there. We design pricing functions based on the current resource utilization ratios, in a wide array of demand-supply relationships and resource occupation durations, and prove worst-case competitive ratios of the pricing functions in terms of social welfare. In the basic case of a single-type, non-recycled resource (i.e., allocated resources are not later released for reuse), we prove that our pricing function design is optimal, in that any other pricing function can only lead to a worse competitive ratio. Insights obtained from the basic cases are then used to generalize the pricing functions to more realistic cloud systems with multiple types of resources, where a job occupies allocated resources for a number of time slots till completion, upon which time the resources are returned back to the cloud resource pool.
  • The emerging paradigm of network function virtualization advocates deploying virtualized network functions (VNF) on standard virtualization platforms for significant cost reduction and management flexibility. There have been system designs for managing dynamic deployment and scaling of VNF service chains within one cloud data center. Many real-world network services involve geo-distributed service chains, with prominent examples of mobile core networks and IMSs (IP Multimedia Subsystems). Virtualizing these service chains requires efficient coordination of VNF deployment across different geo-distributed data centers over time, calling for new management system design. This paper designs a dynamic scaling system for geo-distributed VNF service chains, using the case of an IMS. IMSs are widely used subsystems for delivering multimedia services among mobile users in a 3G/4G network, whose virtualization has been broadly advocated in the industry for reducing cost, improving network usage efficiency and enabling dynamic network topology reconfiguration for performance optimization. Our scaling system design caters to key control-plane and data-plane service chains in an IMS, combining proactive and reactive approaches for timely, cost-effective scaling of the service chains. We evaluate our system design using real-world experiments on both emulated platforms and geo-distributed clouds.
  • The growing demand in mobile Internet access calls for high capacity and energy efficient cellular access with better cell coverage. The in-band relaying solution, proposed in LTE-Advanced, improves coverage without requiring additional spectrum for backhauling, making its deployment more economical and practical. However, in-band relay without careful management incurs low spectrum utilization and reduces the system capacity. We propose auction-based solutions that aim at dynamic spectrum resource sharing, maximizing the utilization of precious spectrum resources. We first present a truthful auction that ensures a theoretical performance guarantee in terms of social welfare. Then in an extended system model that focuses on addressing the heterogeneity of resource blocks, we design a more practical auction mechanism. We implement our proposed auctions under large scale real-world settings. Simulation results verify the efficacy of proposed auctions, showing improvements in both cell coverage and spectrum efficiency.
  • Network Function Virtualization (NFV) is an emerging paradigm that turns hardware-dependent implementation of network functions (i.e., middleboxes) into software modules running on virtualized platforms, for significant cost reduction and ease of management. Such virtual network functions (VNFs) commonly constitute service chains, to provide network services that traffic flows need to go through. Efficient deployment of VNFs for network service provisioning is key to realize the NFV goals. Existing efforts on VNF placement mostly deal with offline or one-time placement, ignoring the fundamental, dynamic deployment and scaling need of VNFs to handle practical time-varying traffic volumes. This work investigates dynamic placement of VNF service chains across geo-distributed datacenters to serve flows between dispersed source and destination pairs, for operational cost minimization of the service chain provider over the entire system span. An efficient online algorithm is proposed, which consists of two main components: (1) A regularization-based approach from online learning literature to convert the offline optimal deployment problem into a sequence of one-shot regularized problems, each to be efficiently solved in one time slot; (2) An online dependent rounding scheme to derive feasible integer solutions from the optimal fractional solutions of the one-shot problems, and to guarantee a good competitive ratio of the online algorithm over the entire time span. We verify our online algorithm with solid theoretical analysis and trace-driven simulations under realistic settings.
  • On-demand resource provisioning in cloud computing provides tailor-made resource packages (typically in the form of VMs) to meet users' demands. Public clouds nowadays provide more and more elaborated types of VMs, but have yet to offer the most flexible dynamic VM assembly, which is partly due to the lack of a mature mechanism for pricing tailor-made VMs on the spot. This work proposes an efficient randomized auction mechanism based on a novel application of smoothed analysis and randomized reduction, for dynamic VM provisioning and pricing in geo-distributed cloud data centers. This auction, to the best of our knowledge, is the first one in literature that achieves (i) truthfulness in expectation, (ii) polynomial running time in expectation, and (iii) $(1-\epsilon)$-optimal social welfare in expectation for resource allocation, where $\epsilon$ can be arbitrarily close to 0. Our mechanism consists of three modules: (1) an exact algorithm to solve the NP-hard social welfare maximization problem, which runs in polynomial time in expectation, (2) a perturbation-based randomized resource allocation scheme which produces a VM provisioning solution that is $(1-\epsilon)$-optimal, and (3) an auction mechanism that applies the perturbation-based scheme for dynamic VM provisioning and prices the customized VMs using a randomized VCG payment, with a guarantee in truthfulness in expectation. We validate the efficacy of the mechanism through careful theoretical analysis and trace-driven simulations.
  • Social networks have been popular platforms for information propagation. An important use case is viral marketing: given a promotion budget, an advertiser can choose some influential users as the seed set and provide them free or discounted sample products; in this way, the advertiser hopes to increase the popularity of the product in the users' friend circles by the world-of-mouth effect, and thus maximizes the number of users that information of the production can reach. There has been a body of literature studying the influence maximization problem. Nevertheless, the existing studies mostly investigate the problem on a one-off basis, assuming fixed known influence probabilities among users, or the knowledge of the exact social network topology. In practice, the social network topology and the influence probabilities are typically unknown to the advertiser, which can be varying over time, i.e., in cases of newly established, strengthened or weakened social ties. In this paper, we focus on a dynamic non-stationary social network and design a randomized algorithm, RSB, based on multi-armed bandit optimization, to maximize influence propagation over time. The algorithm produces a sequence of online decisions and calibrates its explore-exploit strategy utilizing outcomes of previous decisions. It is rigorously proven to achieve an upper-bounded regret in reward and applicable to large-scale social networks. Practical effectiveness of the algorithm is evaluated using both synthetic and real-world datasets, which demonstrates that our algorithm outperforms previous stationary methods under non-stationary conditions.
  • Network Function Virtualization (NFV) is a promising technology that promises to significantly reduce the operational costs of network services by deploying virtualized network functions (VNFs) to commodity servers in place of dedicated hardware middleboxes. The VNFs are typically running on virtual machine instances in a cloud infrastructure, where the virtualization technology enables dynamic provisioning of VNF instances, to process the fluctuating traffic that needs to go through the network functions in a network service. In this paper, we target dynamic provisioning of enterprise network services - expressed as one or multiple service chains - in cloud datacenters, and design efficient online algorithms without requiring any information on future traffic rates. The key is to decide the number of instances of each VNF type to provision at each time, taking into consideration the server resource capacities and traffic rates between adjacent VNFs in a service chain. In the case of a single service chain, we discover an elegant structure of the problem and design an efficient randomized algorithm achieving a e/(e-1) competitive ratio. For multiple concurrent service chains, an online heuristic algorithm is proposed, which is O(1)-competitive. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithms using solid theoretical analysis and trace-driven simulations.
  • IaaS clouds invest substantial capital in operating their data centers. Reducing the cost of resource provisioning, is their forever pursuing goal. Computing resource trading among multiple IaaS clouds provide a potential for IaaS clouds to utilize cheaper resources to fulfill their jobs, by exploiting the diversities of different clouds' workloads and operational costs. In this paper, we focus on studying the IaaS clouds' cost reduction through computing resource trading among multiple IaaS clouds. We formulate the global cost minimization problem among multiple IaaS clouds under cooperative scenario where each individual cloud's workload and cost information is known. Taking into consideration jobs with disparate lengths, a non-preemptive approximation algorithm for leftover job migration and new job scheduling is designed. Given to the selfishness of individual clouds, we further design a randomized double auction mechanism to elicit clouds' truthful bidding for buying or selling virtual machines. We evaluate our algorithms using trace-driven simulations.
  • By sharing resources among different cloud providers, the paradigm of federated clouds exploits temporal availability of resources and geographical diversity of operational costs for efficient job service. While interoperability issues across different cloud platforms in a cloud federation have been extensively studied, fundamental questions on cloud economics remain: When and how should a cloud trade resources (e.g., virtual machines) with others, such that its net profit is maximized over the long run, while a close-to-optimal social welfare in the entire federation can also be guaranteed? To answer this question, a number of important, inter-related decisions, including job scheduling, server provisioning and resource pricing, should be dynamically and jointly made, while the long-term profit optimality is pursued. In this work, we design efficient algorithms for inter-cloud virtual machine (VM) trading and scheduling in a cloud federation. For VM transactions among clouds, we design a double-auction based mechanism that is strategyproof, individual rational, ex-post budget balanced, and efficient to execute over time. Closely combined with the auction mechanism is a dynamic VM trading and scheduling algorithm, which carefully decides the true valuations of VMs in the auction, optimally schedules stochastic job arrivals with different SLAs onto the VMs, and judiciously turns on and off servers based on the current electricity prices. Through rigorous analysis, we show that each individual cloud, by carrying out the dynamic algorithm in the online double auction, can achieve a time-averaged profit arbitrarily close to the offline optimum. Asymptotic optimality in social welfare is also achieved under homogeneous cloud settings. We carry out trace-driven simulations to examine the effectiveness of our algorithms and the achievable social welfare under heterogeneous cloud settings.
  • As an important application in the busy world today, mobile video conferencing facilitates virtual face-to-face communication with friends, families and colleagues, via their mobile devices on the move. However, how to provision high-quality, multi-party video conferencing experiences over mobile devices is still an open challenge. The fundamental reason behind is the lack of computation and communication capacities on the mobile devices, to scale to large conferencing sessions. In this paper, we present vSkyConf, a cloud-assisted mobile video conferencing system to fundamentally improve the quality and scale of multi-party mobile video conferencing. By novelly employing a surrogate virtual machine in the cloud for each mobile user, we allow fully scalable communication among the conference participants via their surrogates, rather than directly. The surrogates exchange conferencing streams among each other, transcode the streams to the most appropriate bit rates, and buffer the streams for the most efficient delivery to the mobile recipients. A fully decentralized, optimal algorithm is designed to decide the best paths of streams and the most suitable surrogates for video transcoding along the paths, such that the limited bandwidth is fully utilized to deliver streams of the highest possible quality to the mobile recipients. We also carefully tailor a buffering mechanism on each surrogate to cooperate with optimal stream distribution. We have implemented vSkyConf based on Amazon EC2 and verified the excellent performance of our design, as compared to the widely adopted unicast solutions.